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Full Text Citations For Award of

The Distinguished Service Cross
 U.S. Army Recipients  - Korea 

  D - H  

To All Who Shall See These Presents Greeting:

This is to Certify that
The President of the United States of America
Takes Pride in Presenting


THE 
DISTINGUISHED SERVICE CROSS
to

DALY, DONALD F.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Donald F. Daly (0-2028677), First Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with an Infantry Company of the 15th Infantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division. First Lieutenant Daly distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Haktang-ni, Korea, on 1 December 1952. On that date, Lieutenant Daly led a patrol into enemy territory under orders to capture a prisoner of war. When approximately 3,500 yards forward of the main line of resistance, they patrol made contact with an estimated company of hostile troops, hidden in rice paddies. Under his leadership the initial enemy onslaught was repelled, but Lieutenant Daly was wounded by a grenade during the second enemy attack. While still under attack, he crawled to his communications man and recoilless rifle gunner, both wounded and lying in exposed positions, and dragged them to cover. After radioing for mortar and artillery support, he rendered first aid to all of the wounded whom he could reach while persisting in his efforts to silence an enemy machine-gun with carbine fire. Calling for mortar and artillery support, he directed it in such an effective manner that three enemy machine-guns were destroyed. Even under the intense hostile artillery and mortar fire to which the area was subjected, he kept complete control of the patrol. Despite his wounds, he personally directed the evacuation of the wounded before withdrawing the patrol and remained in the area until every man had been accounted for.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 522 (May 31, 1953)
Home Town: Fairfield, Connecticut

DALY, JOHN H.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to John H. Daly (0-20284), Lieutenant Colonel (Field Artillery), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Headquarters Battery, 555th Field Artillery Battalion, 25th Infantry Division. Lieutenant Colonel Daly distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces near Pongam-ni, Korea, on 10 August 1950. On that date, his battery was in support of an infantry regiment in a defensive position when numerically superior enemy forces infiltrated and attacked the artillery positions with heavy tanks and automatic weapons fire. Organizing the defense and fire of his own unit, Colonel Daly proceeded to the infantry battalion command post to lend assistance. The infantry commander was wounded and Colonel Daly, although wounded in the leg, immediately assumed command of the infantry battalion, leading them so skillfully that the enemy was repulsed with heavy losses. That night colonel Daly led the infantry battalion in a counterattack and, without regard for his own personal safety, repeatedly exposed himself in leading the attack. During this action he was wounded twice but refused to be evacuated until the counterattack was successful.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 76 (September 20, 1950)
Home Town: Monterey, California

DANIEL, SAMUEL E.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Samuel E. Daniel (0-1919423), Second Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as Platoon Leader in an Infantry Company of the 17th Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division. Second Lieutenant Daniel distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Sokkogae, Korea, on the afternoon of 8 July 1953. On that date, Lieutenant Daniel was the leader of a platoon that was pinned down by machine-gun fire while counter-attacking a vital outpost. With complete disregard for his own safety, Lieutenant Daniel assaulted the enemy gun position alone, killed the crew and silenced the weapon. Again braving the intense barrage, he proceeded forward, using his carbine and grenades with great effectiveness, and destroyed a hostile bunker. Although wounded in the action, Lieutenant Daniel led the advance of his platoon until it was forced to withdraw to the cover of trenches by a lack ammunition. Noticing a wounded man lying in an exposed position, Lieutenant Daniel courageously ignored the heavy small-arms and grenade fire, crawled to within a few yards of enemy emplacements and dragged the injured infantryman to safety. Although unable to walk, Lieutenant Daniel then directed his comrades in establishing defensive positions and refused to be evacuated until other more seriously wounded men had been withdrawn.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 1050 (December 1, 1953)
Home Town: Knox, Tennessee

*DANKOWSKI, STANLEY RAYMOND (MIA)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Stanley Raymond Dankowski (0-1925162), First Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company K, 3d Battalion, 65th Infantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division. First Lieutenant Dankowski distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces near Honu-Chon, Korea, on 6 July 1953. Early on the morning of 6 July 1953, Lieutenant Dankowski was leading an assault platoon participating in an attack on an enemy-held hill. As the platoon began its advance up the second slope of the hill, it was subjected to a heavy concentration of fire from enemy automatic rifles. Lieutenant Dankowski moved up and down the skirmish line, encouraging his men, urging them forward, and instilling them with an aggressive spirit that carried them successfully through this phase of the attack. Mid-way up the third and final slope of the hill, the platoon was again met by a barrage from enemy machine guns and supporting automatic rifles. Ordering his men to cover his advance, Lieutenant Dankowski without regard to his personal peril, moved directly into the enemy fire, climbed to the roof of a large bunker from which fire was coming and hurled hand grenades into the aperture. His courageous action neutralized the position and enabled his men to advance. When last seen, Lieutenant Dankowski had been critically wounded by artillery fire while firing on other enemy positions with his carbine. The extraordinary heroism exhibited by Lieutenant Dankowski on this occasion reflects great credit on himself and is in keeping with the finest traditions of the military service.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 830 (September 9, 1953)
Home Town: Essex, New Jersey

*DANNUCCI, ANTHONY, JR.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Anthony Dannucci, Jr. (0-1540859), Captain (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as Commanding Officer of Company G, 2d Battalion, 19th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division. Captain Dannucci distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces near Sangho-ri, Korea, on 6 February 1951. On that date, Company G was given the mission of recapturing a hill which the enemy had secured during a nigh attack. Taking a position with the most forward element of the attacking unit, Captain Dannucci displaying great courage, led his men in a valiant assault on an enemy sector, forcing them to abandon their positions. During this action one platoon of his company attacking a different sector was pinned down by intense enemy fire. Captain Dannucci immediately went to the position of this platoon and, shouting words of encouragement to his men, ordered them to fix bayonets. He then led them in a daring assault on the enemy, killing many and forcing the remainder to flee in disorder. In the final stage of this assault he was killed by a burst of automatic fire. The gallant and intrepid action of Captain Dannucci inspired his men to complete their mission despite overwhelming odds and was in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 194 (April 7, 1951)
Home Town: Bronx, New York

*DARE, ROBERT E.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Robert E. Dare (RA6794378), Sergeant First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as an Assistant Squad Leader in a platoon of Company K, 3d Battalion, 34th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division. Sergeant First Class Dare distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces at Taejon, Korea, on 20 July 1950. On that date, Sergeant First Class Dare's platoon was leading the company advance along the airport road when it was disperse into rice paddies and pinned down by cross-fire from six hostile tanks and an estimated enemy battalion. Sergeant Dare, with utter disregard for his safety, exposed himself to the intense fire to take command of the platoon. Displaying outstanding leadership and courage, he personally directed the fire of his machine-gun squad, reorganized the platoon, and ordered its withdrawal to a defensive position. During this action he was critically wounded, but continued to command the platoon. Refusing aid, he ordered his men to leave him behind and withdraw to a secure position. His initiative, aggressiveness, and gallantry during this engagement cost him his life but saved many of his comrades.
Department of the Army: General Orders No. 16 (March 20, 1951)
Home Town: Marin, California

DAUGHERTY, ROBERT M.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Robert M. Daugherty (0-1794789), Captain (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as the S-1 Officer with Headquarters, 2d Battalion, 23d Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division. Captain Daugherty distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Chorwon, Korea, on 17 July 1952. Late on that night a friendly company occupying positions on a tactically important hill was subjected to an intense hostile artillery and mortar bombardment followed by a smashing assault by an estimated enemy battalion. Captain Daugherty voluntarily left his rear area position and proceeded to the scene of the battle. Finding that the friendly troops had been forced from the crest of the hill by the enemy assault, he directed the evacuation of casualties and then reorganized the remnants of the friendly company and led them in a charge up the fire-swept slope. Wounded in the head by enemy fire, he ignored the pain and continued to lead his men forward until they became pinned down near the top of the hill. There, when an estimated three hundred of the foe charged forward in an attempt to engulf the small band of friendly infantrymen, he called for artillery fire directly in front of his position and successfully broke up the attack. Pushed down the hill by a second hostile wave, he again reorganized his men and, sending a small force up the right flank of the hill, led his own troops straight up the slope through a murderous hostile bombardment into the teeth of the enemy fire. Wounded a second time in the shoulders and back by flying shell fragments, he nevertheless continued to lead the friendly advance. Inspired by his example, his men charged forward until they were stopped just short of the crest of the hill by the vast numerical superiority of the foe. Bleeding heavily and almost unconscious, Captain Daugherty nevertheless remained in his exposed position directing friendly artillery and mortar fire until a relief force arrived and he was ordered to the rear for evacuation.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 711 (November 18, 1952)
Home Town: Arlington, Virginia

*DAVIS, COURTENAY CHIRM, JR.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Courtney Chirm Davis, Jr. (0-59384), Second Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as a Platoon Leader with Company B, 1st Battalion, 5th Cavalry Regiment (Infantry), 1st Cavalry Division. Second Lieutenant Davis distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces near Waegwan, Korea, on 13 September 1950. On 12 September 1950 the enemy, in overwhelmingly superior numbers, attacked a hill occupied by Company B and forced them to withdraw. On the following day, Company B initiated a counterattack to regain the lost ground, and Lieutenant Davis was assigned the mission of leading his platoon in the attack. Devoid of cover or concealment, he fearlessly led his men up the hill toward the heavily armed, well- entrenched enemy. As they struggled upward, they were subjected to intense machine-gun and small-arms fire. Shouting words of encouragement to his platoon, Lieutenant Davis courageously exposed himself to the withering fire, spurring his men to greater effort. As the attack continued against almost insurmountable odds, he was seriously wounded. Refusing to leave his men, he half-hobbled, half-crawled toward the objective, valiantly directing the assault until he was mortally wounded by a burst of enemy machine-gun fire. Inspired by the dauntless actions of their leader, the men of Lieutenant Davis' platoon charged the enemy emplacement with such fury that the hostile troops became disorganized and fled in disorder.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 267, (May 4, 1951)
Home Town: Laramie, Wyoming

*DAVIS, LOUIS H.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Louis H. Davis (0-1330524), First Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as a Platoon Leader with Company K, 3d Battalion, 9th Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division. First Lieutenant Davis distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Kung-dong, Korea, on the night of 6 October 1951. On that night, Lieutenant Davis led his platoon against a fanatical force occupying heavily fortified hill positions on a strategic slope. As the friendly troops advanced, they were subjected to a devastating volume of enemy small-arms and automatic weapons fire. The men sought what cover they could on the bare hillside in an effort to escape the heavy fire. Realizing that his men faced annihilation in their open positions, Lieutenant Davis exposed himself to the intense fire in order to seek out the concealed enemy emplacements. He then directed the fire of his men, constantly moving among them across the fire-swept terrain, shouting words of encouragement. The counterfire of the friendly troops commanded by Lieutenant Davis proved so effective that it enabled other friendly units to advance against the hostile positions and to drive the enemy troops from the objective with heavy casualties. Although he was mortally wounded in this action, Lieutenant Davis, with strength ebbing fast, remained with his men and continued to direct their fire until he succumbed.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 50 (January 25, 1952)
Home Town: Victoria, Texas

DAVIS, LOWELL M.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Lowell M. Davis, First Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Infantry Company. First Lieutenant Davis distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Kach il-Li, Korea, on the afternoon of 27 October 1952. On that date, Lieutenant Davis was in command of an outpost approximately two miles forward of the main line of resistance which was assaulted after receiving a heavy concentration of hostile artillery and mortar fire. Constantly exposed to enemy fire, Lieutenant Davis moved among his men, coordinating the defense of the position and encouraging them, until the enemy assault was stemmed. He then reorganized his unit and established control in the sector. Later that night, the enemy launched a 2d Battalion- sized assault, storming the outpost through their own barrage. While moving among his men, Lieutenant Davis was rendered unconscious by concussion from a shell burst. When he regained consciousness, he found his men engaged in bitter hand-to- hand combat with the enemy. Unhesitatingly, Lieutenant Davis ran to a machine-gun position and, finding the crew wounded, delivered accurate fire into the ranks of the advancing enemy. He further disorganized their advance by hurling accurately-placed hand grenades. When the United Nations element was ordered to withdraw, Lieutenant Davis covered the withdrawal with machine-gun fire. After the last man had left the position, he removed the gun from its mount and carried it with him, providing covering fire as he moved back.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 842 (September 13, 1953)

*DAVIS, MARVIN L.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Marvin L. Davis (RA16310338), Corporal, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with a machine gun section of Company H, 2d Battalion, 7th Cavalry Regiment (Infantry), 1st Cavalry Division. Corporal Davis distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Waegwan, Korea, on 3 September 1950. On that date, Company F, Seventh Cavalry Regiment, with an attached machine-gun section from Company H, was defensively deployed on Hill 300 near Waegwan when elements of a hostile division launched a mass attack against the hill, preceded by an intense artillery and mortar barrage. When it became apparent that the hill could not be held against the numerically superior enemy force, the company was ordered to withdraw. Corporal Davis a machine-gunner attached to the company, and two comrades volunteered to remain behind and cover the withdrawal. He remained at his gun delivering accurate, withering fire into the ranks of the advancing enemy until his position was overrun, then began throwing hand grenades and engaging the enemy in hand-to-hand combat. When the company launched a counterattack later in the day and regained the hill, Corporal Davis was found dead beside his machine-gun, and the surrounding area was littered with enemy dead. The extraordinary heroism and selfless devotion to duty displayed by Corporal Davis enabled his company to execute a successful withdrawal with minimum casualties.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 460 (June 25, 1951)
Home Town: Floyd, Indiana

*DEEMER, GEORGE R.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to George R. Deemer (US56077131), Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company F, 2d Battalion, 38th Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division. Sergeant Deemer distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces at Imokchong, Korea, on 10 October 1951. On that date, Sergeant Deemer's platoon was halted in its advance against Hill 800 on "Heartbreak Ridge" by heavy hostile mortar and automatic-weapons fire when Sergeant Deemer, with his 57-mm. recoilless rifle and a companion loader voluntarily took his place in the skirmish line of the assault squad. Firing his weapon from the shoulder, he maintained his place in the advancing line, destroyed several enemy emplacements, and inflicted numerous casualties. After the platoon attained its objective, he set up his weapon a the crest of the ridge and, although exposed to hostile fire form both flanks, delivered accurate fire into the counterattacking enemy until his ammunition was exhausted. Organizing two machine-gun crews, he personally directed their fire on the enemy with excellent results and, when ammunition ran low, led his squad back for more, making three trips under fire to the supply point. While returning to the line with ammunition the third time, he was mortally wounded by enemy mortar fire.
Department of the Army: General Orders No. 64 (June 30, 1952)
Home Town: Maricopa, Arizona

*DEHERRERA, WILLIE B.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Willie B. DeHerrera (US17227071), Private First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company I, 3d Battalion, 31st Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division. Private First Class DeHerrera distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces at Nae-ri, Korea, on 26 October 1951. On that date, Private DeHerrera was the point man of the leading squad of a platoon during an assault on a heavily fortified and well-concealed enemy position. With little regard for his safety, he preceded the platoon up the hill against the enemy position while the enemy was throwing down grenades and sweeping the area with small-arms fire. Although apparently wounded twice, he continued to advance by crawling toward the enemy, firing his weapon until he was killed within a few feet of the enemy position.
Department of the Army: General Orders No. 75 (August 6, 1952)
Home Town: Conejos, Colorado

*DEPALMA, FRED P.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Fred P. DePalma (0-59828), Captain (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as Commanding Officer of Company G, 2d Battalion, 7th Cavalry Regiment (Infantry), 1st Cavalry Division. Captain DePalma distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces near Waegwan, Korea, on 19 September 1950. While attacking a heavily defended enemy position blocking the American drive northward along the Taegu-Waegwan road, Captain DePalma's company came under and was pinned down by intense enemy tank, mortar and small-arms fire. In the ensuing action Captain DePalma, with complete disregard for his own safety, moved form position to position in the intense enemy fire to rally his troops and issue instructions for continuing the attack. When ambushed by two enemy snipers at very close range, he returned their fire and killed them both. Stimulated by is selfless courage and inspirational leadership, his men left their places of concealment and launched a full-scale attack on the enemy, inflicting heavy casualties and destroying large quantities of ammunition and equipment. Though wounded during the attack, he refused to be evacuated and continued to lead his men forward until the objective had been taken. When his company was directed to withdraw from their newly-won position, he voluntarily elected to remain behind to cover his unit's withdrawal and insure that all the wounded were evacuated. In attempting to rejoin the company, Captain DePalma was ambushed by an enemy patrol and in the fighting that followed he single-handedly killed six of the enemy before he was killed. Captain DePalma's selfless courage and conspicuous devotion to duty in the face of enemy fire was responsible for opening a main supply route on the United Nations drive to the north.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 182 (March 30, 1951)
Home Town: Westchester, New York

*DIANDA, ALFRED P.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Alfred P. Dianda (0-963871), Second Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with the Company D, 1st Battalion, 19th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division. Second Lieutenant Dianda distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces near Taejon, Korea, on 16 July 1950. On this date during a withdrawal from the Kum River Line, Lieutenant Dianda's unit was halted by an enemy roadblock consisting of well-emplaced automatic weapons and small-arms fire. The enemy emplacements were situated above a narrow, winding mountain road and covered all approaches with heavy fire. The initial enemy fire was heavy and accurate, and caused many casualties. Lieutenant Dianda mounted a tank and, in his exposed position directed fire against the enemy, destroying many of the gun emplacements. Following this assault a second roadblock was encountered. Lieutenant Dianda mounted an abandoned truck, personally manned a .50 caliber machine-gun, and silenced the hostile weapons. Later Lieutenant Dianda, through his initiative, leadership, courage, and ability reorganized three hundred survivors of the battalion while under fire and led them through mountainous enemy territory for a distance of twenty miles to safety. His resourcefulness saved the lives of many soldiers and established order out of chaos.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 77 (September 23, 1950)
Home Town: Marquette, Michigan

DIAZ, VICTOR F.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Victor F. Diaz (0-1341081), First Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company C, 1st Battalion, 19th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division. First Lieutenant Diaz distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Chaechi-hyon, Korea, on 3 June 1951. On that date, Company C was assigned the mission of attacking and securing hill positions from a well-entrenched hostile force. As the men proceeded toward their objective, they were subjected to a devastating crossfire from hidden enemy machine-gun emplacements which effectively pinned them down. Immediately rushing to the front of the company through the heavy volume of fire, Captain Diaz urged his men forward, setting an example by rushing at the nearest hostile machine-gun emplacement and killing its three occupants with his pistol. Inspired by his courageous actions, the men renewed their assault and routed the enemy from the hill after a bitter struggle. Skillfully deploying his men in defensive positions, Captain Diaz encouraged them and directed their fire as the enemy launched a fierce counterattack. After being repulsed with numerous casualties, the hostile force regrouped and, preceded by a mortar barrage, attacked again. With their ammunition running low, the friendly troops received an order to fall back to more formidable positions. Although painfully wounded by an exploding mortar shell, Captain Diaz remained in his position, covering the withdrawal of his men by firing his carbine at the on-rushing enemy. Not until he was the only man left on the hill and the enemy threatened to encircle his position did he withdraw.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 763 (October 12, 1951)
Home Town: New York, New York

DICK, JOSEPH D.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Joseph D. Dick (RA11187458), Master Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company B, 1st Battalion, 7th Infantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division. Master Sergeant Dick distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces near Chungjang-ni, Korea, on 14 February 1951. Master Sergeant Dick's platoon, defending Hill 151, had been attacked by numerically superior hostile forces during the night when the platoon leader was seriously wounded. Sergeant Dick, who had left the platoon command post to take up a position on the line in order to more effectively direct the automatic weapon fire on the attackers, crawled through deadly hostile fire and carried his platoon leader to a place of safety. The wounded platoon commander ordered a withdrawal but Sergeant Dick nevertheless returned to the line, reorganized the battered platoon and continued the defense of the position. When an enemy soldier threw a hand grenade into the midst of the staunch defenders, Sergeant Dick quickly picked it up, threw it back at the thrower, killing him and two other enemy soldiers. Leading an inspired counterattack he fired continually into the enemy horde until his ammunition was exhausted, then picked up the weapon of a Chinese Communist he had killed and continued to lead the platoon. Again running out of ammunition he took over the automatic weapon of a wounded man, continued the fierce assault, and succeeded in securing Hill 151. During his daring exploits he was wounded but refused medical attention until he had assured the defense of the position. Sergeant Dick's heroic action, indomitable courage and sustained devotion to duty reflect great credit upon himself and uphold the finest traditions of the military service.
Department of the Army: General Orders No. 85 (September 25, 1951)
Home Town: Androscoggin, Maine

*DICKINSON, GEORGE H.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to George H. Dickinson (0-995407), First Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with an Infantry Company of the 7th Infantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division. First Lieutenant Dickinson distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Koyang-dae, Korea, on 25 July 1952. On that night, Lieutenant Dickinson organized a volunteer squad to reinforce a friendly outpost which had been attacked the previous day. While the group was deploying, a superior enemy force assaulted the position from all sides. Lieutenant Dickinson, with unflinching determination and dauntless courage, exposed himself to a barrage of fire from enemy automatic weapons and grenades to move among his men directing their fire. As the enemy closed in, he stood fast in the face of exploding grenades and a rain of bullets. When is carbine jammed, and the supply of grenades was exhausted, he jumped out of the trench and charged the enemy troops with his bayonet, engaging them in hand-to-hand combat. Fighting gallantly in spite of body wounds from grenades, Lieutenant Dickinson continued to push forward until he was mortally wounded. When he was last seen by his men, he was on his knees struggling desperately to rise and continue his courageous stand. Lieutenant Dickinson's spectacular display of courage and devotion to duty so inspired his men that a spirited counterattack forced the enemy to withdraw. On retaking the hill, the friendly forces found Lieutenant Dickinson's body with three of the enemy dead in front of him.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 221 (February 16, 1953)
Home Town: Beltrami, Minnesota

*DICKSON, FRANKLIN P.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Franklin P. Dickson (RA16335965), Private First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company B, 1st Battalion, 15th Infantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division. Private First Class Dickson distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Sobangsan, Korea, on 23 June 1951. Company B, assigned the mission of attacking and securing Hill 717 from a firmly entrenched hostile force, was moving forward up the slope when it was suddenly pinned down by intense and accurate fire from an enemy automatic-weapons position. Private Dickson, realizing that his comrades faced possible annihilation unless aggressive action was taken, unhesitatingly left his, position of comparative safety and charged forward through the devastating enemy fire toward the hostile emplacement. After successfully killing the enemy machine-gun crew and capturing their weapon, he immediately turned it on the enemy positions and commenced firing. Completely demoralized by Private Dickson's heroic actions, the hostile troops broke in the face of his devastating fire and fled from their positions, allowing the friendly forces to seize the objective. During the night, the enemy launched a fiercely determined counterattack to regain the lost ground and Private Dickson, courageously defending his position, was killed in the bitter fighting that ensued.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 649 (August 18, 1951)
Home Town: Dekalb, Indiana

DILIETO, JOHN M.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to John M. Dilieto, Private First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company E, 2d Battalion, 35th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division. Private First Class Dilieto distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Seoul, Korea, on 20 May 1951. On that date, Private Dilieto's platoon launched an assault against a well-entrenched and determined enemy force on Hill 420. Moving his machine-gun through heavy small-arms and automatic-weapons fire, he constantly raked the enemy with a steady stream of fire, forcing them to cover. After a series of forward displacements, his machine-gun developed a stoppage, thus enabling the enemy to take the initiative and halt the attack with a devastating barrage of machine-gun fire and grenades. Discarding the machine gun, he advanced with only his carbine and, despite the heavy volume of enemy fire, destroyed the main enemy strongpoint. Pressing on to the crest of the hill, he attacked another emplacement, but his weapon failed to function. Using his carbine as a club, he leaped into the foxhole and killed its occupants. His bold action enabled his comrades to renew the assault and drive the remaining enemy from the objective.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 633 (August 12, 1951)

DILLEY, GERALD L.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Gerald L. Dilley (RA17263329), Corporal, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company B, 1st Battalion, 19th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division. Corporal Dilley distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces near Hyenbang-ni, Korea, on 30 June 1951. On that date, Corporal Dilley's company was attacking a massive and rugged terrain feature firmly held by an estimated reinforced enemy company in well-prepared, sandbagged and camouflaged positions. As the attack progressed, his squad leader was wounded and evacuated. Corporal Dilley, although painfully wounded, assumed command of the squad and continued to direct the attack. After neutralizing two enemy positions, an enemy grenade landed so close to him that he was knocked one hundred feet down the nearly vertical hill. Ignoring the bruises and the pain from his wound, he quickly climbed back to his squad and continued to lead them in their advance. The last objectives of his squad were two emplacements consisting of two machine-guns in one and two submachine-guns in the other, which were holding up the advance of the entire company. Working his way forward under extremely heavy machine-gun fire and a shower of grenades, he reconnoitered the best route to attack these positions. While on this mission he was again wounded by machine-gun fire; but upon returning to his squad, organized them for the final assault. Leading them aggressively forward, he singled out one of the machine-gun emplacements, moved into it and with his bayonet and rifle butt killed the crew of four as his squad engaged the enemy in hand-to-hand combat. As these positions were cleared, enemy resistance on the hill crumbled and the company moved forward. While Corporal Dilley reorganized his men in a defensive position on the summit of the mountainous area, the company commander detected his wounds and ordered him to the rear for medical attention.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 310 (May 15, 1951)
Home Town: Garden, Nebraska

*DINKEL, JACK L.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Jack L. Dinkel (0-0062270), First Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with an Infantry Company of the 15th Infantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division. First Lieutenant Dinkel distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Sobang-san, Korea, on the evening of 23 June 1951. On that date, Lieutenant Dinkel placed the men of his company in defensive positions on a newly captured hill in anticipation of an enemy counterattack. In the early morning hours of 24 June 1951, the large hostile force facing the friendly troops began to launch sporadic attacks. Each was supported by intense small-arms and mortar fire and an extremely heavy barrage of grenades, but each was repulsed by the friendly troops under the inspiring leadership of Lieutenant Dinkel, who constantly moved among his men, completely exposed to the heavy fire, directing the defense and offering words of encouragement. Incensed by the defiance exhibited by the small group of defenders, the enemy gathered their entire strength and hurled wave after wave at the perimeter. Realizing that his men could not hold in the face of such tremendous odds, Lieutenant Dinkel ordered a withdrawal. Their ammunition almost completely expended, the friendly troops began to fall back but Lieutenant Dinkel remained in his position to hurl the remainder of his grenades at the on-rushing enemy. The hostile troops concentrated their fire on the lone officer and he was painfully wounded by exploding grenades. Despite his wounds, Lieutenant Dinkel began to pour a deadly accurate stream of rifle fire into the enemy ranks and, at the same time, he shouted to his men to complete their withdrawal while he held the hostile troops back. Firing rapidly, he halted the charging enemy but, just as the friendly troops reached safety, the hostile force saturated the slope with a tremendous mortar barrage and Lieutenant Dinkel was killed in his position.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 227 (May 1, 1952)
Home Town: Eau Claire, Wisconsin

DIXON, KENNETH B.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Kenneth B. Dixon (RA14328022), Private First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with an Infantry Company of the 279th Infantry Regiment, 45th Infantry Division. Private First Class Dixon distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Mundung-ni, Korea, on 7 February 1953. Private Dixon, an automatic rifleman, was in the lead element of an allied combat patrol which had penetrated into enemy-held territory and was subjected to intense hostile fire from a numerically-superior force. During the action, private Dixon observed a small enemy party approaching the patrol's right flank and, exposing himself to the heavy concentration of fire, met the oncoming enemy with deadly and accurate blasts from his weapon. When he had driven the group back, Private Dixon turned his weapon on an enemy machine gun which had pinned the patrol down and was endangering the lives of his comrades. Although seriously wounded during his courageous stand, Private Dixon did not cease firing until the machine gun crew had been annihilated. Wounded several more times, Private Dixon refused evacuation until the patrol had broken contact with the enemy and began to withdraw. The extraordinary heroism exhibited by Private Dixon on this occasion reflects great credit on himself and is in keeping with the finest traditions of the military service.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 625 (July 2, 1953)
Home Town: Craven, North Carolina

DODD, JAMES K.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to James K. Dodd, First Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company E, 2d Battalion, 7th Infantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division. First Lieutenant Dodd distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Yongan-Ni, North Korea, on 13 December 1950. When the 3d Platoon, Company L, was attacked by a numerically superior Chinese Community force causing the platoon to withdraw due to heavy casualties, Lieutenant Dodd proceeded immediately to the disorganized platoon. Finding the platoon leader severely wounded and all non-commissioned officers wounded or killed, he quickly reorganized the platoon, reinforced it with men from the adjacent platoon, and arranged the evacuation of the wounded. Repeatedly exposing himself to heavy enemy fire at short range, and with utter disregard for his personal safety, Lieutenant Dodd then led the counter-attack of the platoon against a well dug-in enemy across open terrain and through severe hostile cross-fire. The men, inspired by this remarkable display of courage on the part of Lieutenant Dodd, charged the hill with minimal casualties. Lieutenant Dodd personally led the assault against two enemy machine-gun and three mortar positions. As a result of Lieutenant Dodd's courageous action the numerically superior enemy force was forced to retreat in disorder and confusion. His prompt recognition of the serious situation and his instinctive and immediate action to save his men and destroy the enemy are in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service.
Headquarters, X Corps: General Orders No. 70 (December 20, 1950)

DOLAN, WILLIAM J.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to William J. Dolan (0-1688721), First Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving Platoon Leader of the 1st Platoon of Company E, 2d Battalion, 187th Airborne Regimental Combat Team, 11th Airborne Division. First Lieutenant Dolan distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces near Wonju, Korea, on 14 February 1951. When Communist forces seized hill 255 four miles northwest of Wonju and. Seriously threatened the communications center in that city, Company E was ordered to retake the hill and surrounding high ground in a coordinated attack with other elements of the 2d Battalion. Lieutenant Dolan was ordered to attack with his platoon on the right of Company E. The platoon reached the military crest of the hill, but was forced to fall back in the face of withering machine-gun fire. In this initial attack Lieutenant Dolan was wounded in the thigh by grenade fragments but refused to leave his platoon for medical aid. Three subsequent attempts were made to reach the crest of the hill, but each time the platoon was forced back. With casualties steadily mounting in his platoon, Lieutenant Dolan decided his only chance for success was to storm the enemy position. Reorganizing his platoon, he instructed each man of his plan, and on his signal the platoon made an assault up the hill and into the very midst of the enemy. In the savage hand-to-hand fighting which ensued, Lieutenant Dolan personally killed over thirty of the enemy with his carbine, hand grenades, and rifle butt. Inspired by the actions of the 1st platoon, another element of the attacking force reached the hill crest from the flank and engaged in the fray. After the objective had been secured, a total of 451 enemy dead were counted, the majority of which were credited to Lieutenant Dolan's platoon.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 151 (March 20, 1951)
Home Town: Mackinac, Michigan

DOLVIN, WELBORN GRIFFIN
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Welborn Griffin Dolvin, Lieutenant Colonel (Armor), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as Commanding Officer of the 89th Tank Battalion (Task Force DOLVIN), 25th Infantry Division. Lieutenant Colonel Dolvin distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Changgo-ri, Korea, during the period 25 through 27 May 1951. On 25 May 1951, Colonel Dolvin led his task force several miles behind enemy lines with the mission of seizing a key terrain feature and holding the objective until additional friendly forces could link-up with the task force. Fighting their way past several strongly defended antitank positions and enemy roadblocks, the task force reached its objective before nightfall on 25 May 1951 and organized a tight defensive perimeter. During the next two days, Colonel Dolvin constantly exposed himself to enemy fire in personally directing the hit-and-run tactics of his unit, thereby successfully disrupting the enemy's defenses. Under the audacious and brilliant leadership of Colonel Dolvin, the task force Succeeded in capturing many prisoners, killing a large number of the enemy, and destroying a vast amount of enemy weapons and ammunition.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 597 (July 29, 1951)
Born: February 8, 1916 at Siloam, Georgia

DONAHUE, DANIEL J.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Daniel J. Donahue, Corporal, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company B, 1st Battalion, 15th Infantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division. Corporal Donahue distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Sobangsan, Korea, on 23 June 1951. On that date, Company B had launched an assault against a well-fortified and fanatically determined hostile force on Hill 717. As the company advanced, it was met by a heavy volume of machine-gun fire which forced the men of the company to seek cover. Realizing that his comrades faced possible annihilation in their exposed positions, Corporal Donahue acted immediately. Ascertaining the locations of the principal enemy emplacements, Corporal Donahue left his position of comparative safety and, moving across the fire-swept terrain, single-handedly assaulted the nearest one. Firing his automatic rifle with devastating effect, he succeeded in neutralizing the enemy position and immediately advanced on the next emplacement, destroying it also. The destruction of these two positions enabled the friendly forces to renew their assault and to secure the objective, after inflicting numerous casualties among the enemy forces. The extraordinary heroism and selfless devotion to duty displayed by Corporal Donahue throughout his action reflect great credit on himself and are in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 722 (September 25, 1951)

DOOLEY, JAMES W.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to James W. Dooley, Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company E, 2d Battalion, 65th Infantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division. Sergeant Dooley distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Sagimak, Korea, on 9 June 1953. On that date, Sergeant Dooley was a member of an assault party which closed in hand-to-hand combat with a hostile force defending a strategic hill. During the action, Sergeant Dooley continually exposed himself to heavy fire at the entrances to caves sheltering enemy troops to hurl grenades which inflicted numerous casualties and neutralized enemy fire. When six hostile soldiers charged from their bunker into the United Nations ranks, Sergeant Dooley exposed himself and killed all members of the group with automatic rifle fire. Informed that a comrade had been wounded on the upper slope of the hill, Sergeant Dooley climbed the steep slope under the enemy barrage. As he arrived at the wounded man's side, an enemy grenade landed close to the wounded man. Disregarding all thoughts of personal safety, Sergeant Dooley threw himself on top of his wounded comrade to protect him from grenade fragments. In so doing, Sergeant Dooley sustained painful wounds on the arms and hands. Then, with the aid of covering fire from other members of the patrol, Sergeant Dooley, under direct enemy observation, carried the wounded man back down the hill to safety.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 767 (August 19, 1953)

DOTSON, DANIEL W.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Daniel W. Dotson, Second Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company C, 1st Battalion, 15th Infantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division. Second Lieutenant Dotson distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Uijongbu, Korea, on 24 March 1951. On that date, Lieutenant Dotson's platoon moved with Company C in an assault against a well-entrenched and camouflaged enemy force which was fiercely defending its positions on Hill 337. With his platoon spearheading the attack, he observed one of his squads pinned down by a heavy mortar barrage and intense small-arms fire. He quickly reorganized them and maneuvered them to within fifty feet of an enemy emplacement. He then led them forward in a bayonet assault and, with utter disregard for his personal safety, jumped into the enemy dug-out, bayoneted one of the enemy soldiers, and killed the reaming two with a burst of fire from his carbine. Shortly thereafter, he charged another emplacement and moved close enough to throw grenades that killed four of the enemy. Throughout the ensuring action, he fearlessly and aggressively destroyed many enemy strong points to secure its objective.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 631 (August 11, 1951)

*DREYER, HOWARD LEWIS
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Howard Lewis Dreyer (RA17267501), Private First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as an automatic rifleman with Company B, 1st Battalion, 187th Airborne Regimental Combat Team, 11th Airborne Division. Private First Class Dreyer distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Soho-ri, Korea, on 1 June 1951. On that date, Company B was occupying defensive positions on Hill 425 when, at approximately 0300 hours, an estimated company of Chinese Communist troops attacked the left flank of the friendly unit in a frenzied attempt to overrun the position. During this attack the gunner manning a light machine-gun was killed instantly, leaving Private Dreyer with the only automatic weapon in operation. Realizing the immediate need for automatic fire, Private Dreyer exposed himself to the enemy and delivered a devastating volume of fire into the hostile ranks, temporarily halting their attack and giving his comrades time to put the light machine- gun in operation. When the order was given for the company to withdraw, Private Dreyer volunteered to remain behind and provide covering fire for his comrades. Again exposing himself to the enemy, he raked them with fire from his automatic weapon until all personnel and equipment were moved to an alternate position. Then, on receiving the order to withdraw, he walked backwards and continued to fire at the enemy until he rejoined his comrades. At 0730 hours, Private Dreyer and three comrades volunteered to counterattack the enemy positions in an attempt to regain the terrain. As he neared the hostile positions, Private Dreyer began throwing white phosphorous grenades, which provided a covering smoke screen, then moved into close contact with the enemy and fired his automatic rifle directly into their positions. He killed approximately twenty enemy soldiers and assisted in routing the remainder from their positions. As Private Dreyer reached the top of the hill, he inspired his comrades to greater effort by standing upright and calling for them to advance. During the final phase of the counterattack he was killed.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 525 (July 8, 1951)
Home Town: Beltrami, Minnesota

*DUBINSKY, STEPHEN
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Stephen Dubinsky (0-1339149), First Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company A, 1st Battalion, 8th Cavalry Regiment (Infantry), 1st Cavalry Division. First Lieutenant Dubinsky distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces at Yong-dong, Korea, on 24 July 1950. On this date Lieutenant Dubinsky, with his platoon, was in a defensive position in an isolated platoon sector. During the hours of darkness numerically superior enemy forces infiltrated to within fifty yards of the platoon's position and attacked at dawn, supported by mortar and automatic-weapons fire. Lieutenant Dubinsky repeatedly exposed himself to heavy enemy fire in directing and coordinating the defense of his platoon's position. When the position became untenable, he ordered his unit to withdraw, remaining behind to cover the withdrawal. By this time his position was completely surrounded and, without regard for his own personal safety, he called for mortar fire on his position. The well- directed fire struck the position, routing the enemy and saved the platoon's position. After the third volley First Lieutenant Dubinsky was not heard from again.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 76 (September 20, 1950)
Home Town: Huntingdon, Pennsylvania

DUDLEY, ARTHUR C.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Arthur C. Dudley (RA34405368), Sergeant First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company B, 1st Battalion, 19th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division. Sergeant First Class Dudley distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces while his company was occupying a defensive position near the Naktong River near Ch'angnyong, Korea, during the period 2 through 7 August 1950. Sergeant First Class Dudley's company had suffered sever casualties and was at half strength from the result of continuous fighting over a period of weeks. Men were exhausted and were subjected to harassing fire, particularly from enemy snipers and automatic weapons. Sergeant Dudley, an expert rifleman, continually exposed himself by moving from one position to another, in order to locate and fire on the enemy, and his unerring accuracy with the M-1 rifle, often at unbelievable ranges, soon became the pride of his organization. Although often observed and fired upon by both automatic weapons and snipers, Sergeant Dudley calmly continued to expose himself and during a period of approximately five days destroyed over fifty enemy riflemen and machine-gunners. On 7 August 1950, Sergeant Dudley left his foxhole under fire in order to clear a jammed machine-gun, which was proving difficult for the gunner. Later that day he was wounded, but before being evacuated, expressed concern that he be permitted to return as soon as possible in order to continue his deadly destruction of the enemy.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 110 (October 11, 1950)
Home Town: Escambia, Florida

*DUNN, JOHN H.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to John H. Dunn (0-1297335), First Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company A, 1st Battalion, 9th Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division. First Lieutenant Dunn distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Kobangsa-ni, Korea, on 30 August 1951. On that date, Company A was attacking a hostile force occupying well-fortified hill positions. The company had fought its way to within a few feet of its objective when a deadly crossfire from the enemy positions pinned the friendly troops down. In the initial burst of fire from the hostile automatic weapons, the company commander was killed and Lieutenant Dunn immediately assumed command and attempted to press the attack. The devastating volume of enemy small-arms and automatic-weapons fire, however, made it necessary for Lieutenant Dunn to place the company in defensive positions. Disregarding his personal safety, he moved among his men, shouting words of encouragement and pointing out advantageous positions from which they could return the hostile fire. While moving across the exposed terrain in an effort to instill courage in his men, Lieutenant Dunn was killed by a burst of fire from an enemy machine-gun, but his example of fearlessness so inspired his men that they successfully held their positions against overwhelming odds, until the order to withdraw was given.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 900 (November 15, 1951)
Home Town: Hudson, New Jersey

DUNWOODY, HAROLD H.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Harold H. Dunwoody, Major (Armor), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as Commanding Officer of the 3d Battalion, 17th Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division. Major Dunwoody distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Chupari, Korea, during the period 31 August 1951 through 3 September 1951. During this period the 3d Battalion of the 17th Infantry Regiment under the command of Colonel Dunwoody seized enemy-held Hills 820 and 851, key objectives of the 7th Infantry Division, against repeated enemy attacks. Early in the morning of 2 September 1951, Hill 851 was subjected to unusually heavy artillery fire followed by an intense enemy attack. Elements of the 3d Battalion defending Hill 851 gallantly resisted the attack but were forced to move to the rear to reform. Realizing that communication facilities were seriously disrupted and that the enemy had taken a heavy toll, Colonel Dunwoody personally reorganized and encouraged the battalion, frequently exposing himself to hazardous enemy fire in traveling from place to place. To maintain maximum observation and coordination with all elements of his battalion, he established himself in a forward exposed position on Hill 820 and remained there to direct his troops despite numerous fanatical charges by heavily outnumbering enemy forces. On one occasion, attacking enemy troops advanced to fifteen yards of Colonel Dunwoody's observation post, threatening to overrun the forward defenders of Hill 820. Displaying superior intrepidity and coolness under fire, he personally participated in repulsing the attack with grenades and rifle fire, inflicting heavy losses to the enemy, while continuing to direct his men with exceptional insight and military skill.
General Headquarters Far East Command: General Orders No. 88 (March 23, 1955)

DURKEE, RICHARD W.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Richard W. Durkee (0-1325809), First Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company L, 3d Battalion, 65th Infantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division. First Lieutenant Durkee distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Uijongbu, Korea, on 23 March 1951. On that date, while attacking well defended enemy positions on Hill 221, the 1st Platoon of Company L was subjected to intense small arms fire and pinned down. After ordering the remainder of the platoon to furnish covering fire, Lieutenant Drupe led the 1st squad in an assault on the enemy entrenchment's. When his ammunition was expended, Lieutenant Durkee single-handedly assaulted an enemy position and killed the occupant with his bayonet. Unable to remove his bayonet from the body of the dead soldier, he went unarmed to another hostile position, seized an enemy soldier's rifle by the bayonet, wrested the weapon from his hands and clubbed him to death. Although his hand was seriously lacerated during this action, Lieutenant Durkee continued to lead the assault against the enemy and his men, inspired by the fearlessness of their leader, overwhelmed the hostile troops and secured the objective. Lieutenant Durkee's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 522 (July 7, 1951)
Home Town: Washington, D.C.

*DUSEK, RONALD D.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Ronald D. Dusek (RA16281678), Private First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company B, 1st Battalion, 19th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division. Private First Class Dusek distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces on the Kum River north of Taejon, Korea, on 16 July 1950. Private First Class was serving as a medical aid man when the company was in a defensive position on the Kum River line. The enemy attacked and succeeded in penetrating the right flank of the company's position, occupying some vacant foxholes and setting up four automatic-weapons with additional riflemen, which swept the company's position with deadly, accurate fire. Seeing that the company was being decimated, Private First Class Dusek manned a light machine-gun which was not being operated and delivered effective fire, keeping the enemy from advancing. Running out of ammunition, he took his pistol and several grenades and advanced on the enemy, driving them from the foxholes. He kept advancing, firing his pistol and throwing grenades, until he was killed by a burst of machine-gun fire.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 50 (September 3, 1950)
Home Town: Cook County, Illinois

E


EANES, MOIR EARL
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Moir Earl Eanes (0-2203088), Captain (Infantry), [then Second Lieutenant], U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company C, 1st Battalion, 24th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division. Captain Eanes distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces near Chipo-ri, Korea, on 2 June 1951. Captain Eanes dauntlessly led the 3d Platoon, Company C, 24th Infantry Regiment in an attack on the left flank of the Company's objective, Hill 543. After the platoon worked its way up the forward slopes of the hill, it came upon stubborn enemy resistance comprised of numerous well concealed automatic weapons emplaced in the rocky crags. Although several of the men of the platoon were wounded in the initial attack, Captain Eanes quickly rallied the men and renewed the assault. As spearhead of the assault, he personally eliminated two enemy bunkers and led his platoon toward the crest of the hill. Upon reaching the top of the crest, he was wounded by an enemy grenade. Despite his wounds, he refused evacuation, consolidated the gains, and led his men to the final objective. A rain of grenades and hail of enemy bullets again deterred their progress, and although Captain Eanes was seriously wounded, he did not accept evacuation until the platoon was turned over to the platoon sergeant. Captain Eanes' conspicuous gallantry, forceful leadership, and dedicated devotion to duty reflect the highest credit upon himself and the military service.
Department of the Army: General Orders No. 8 (February 25, 1963)
Home Town: Henry, Virginia

EARNEST, ALLEN C.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Allen C. Earnest (38451870), Corporal, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company B, 73d Heavy Tank Battalion, 7th Infantry Division. Corporal Earnest distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces at Suwon, Korea, on 21 September 1950. On that date, Corporal Earnest was assigned duty as loader for the leading tank in Task Force HANNUM. The task force was proceeding south with the mission of securing an air base. At approximately 2300, while passing through Suwon, the task force was brought under heavy tank, small-arms, automatic weapons, and anti-tank fire, and the leading tank was knocked out by a direct hit from an enemy T-34 tank. The tank gunner was killed outright, the driver and assistant driver were both wounded and unconscious, the tank commander (company commander) was so severely wounded that he could not be moved, and Corporal Earnest had both feet blown off. Despite the excruciating pain of his incapacitating wounds and with complete disregard for his personal safety, Corporal Earnest attempted to render first aid to his mortally wounded company commander. Corporal Earnest then pulled himself from the tank turret and dragged himself across the rear deck. Through a veritable hail of machine-gun bullets, Corporal Earnest dragged himself along the ground to warn following tanks of the situation and to seek aid for his fallen comrades. The information Corporal Earnest was able to give saved the following tanks and resulted in the destruction of the enemy tank which was holding up the advance. When medical aid arrived, Corporal Earnest refused to be evacuated until his company commander and other members of his tank crew had been treated.
Headquarters, X Corps: General Orders No. 38 (November 20, 1950)
Home Town: Lincoln, Arkansas

EDWARDS, JAMES W.
Synopsis:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to James W. Edwards, , U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Headquarters Company, 23rd Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division, in action against enemy aggressor forces in the Republic of Korea.
History of the 2d Infantry Division in Korea (1950-1951)

*EILER, RICHARD O.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Richard O. Eiler (0-58140), First Lieutenant (Corps of Engineers), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as a Platoon Leader of Company D, 8th Engineer Combat Battalion, 1st Cavalry Division. First Lieutenant Eiler distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces at Kasan, Korea, on 5 September 1950. Defending the right flank of the company perimeter, Lieutenant Eiler's platoon was subjected to vicious hostile fire from two machine-guns which reduced its strength to twelve men, several of whom were wounded. In order to save his depleted unit from potential annihilation, Lieutenant Eiler crawled fifty yards up a slope, threw two grenades into an emplacement, and silenced one harassing gun. Returning to his platoon, he ordered its withdrawal in the face of a renewed and determined enemy attack, and proceeded to provide covering fire for his men. While assisting the wounded men over a high wall obstructing the withdrawal, he was seriously wounded, but ordered his men to continue on to safety without him. Selecting a position which provided an excellent field of observation, he delivered a withering fire into the hostile ranks until his position was overrun and he was mortally wounded.
Department of the Army, General Orders No. 85 (September 25, 1951)
Home Town: Pima, Arizona

*ELLISON, COLEMAN C.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Coleman C. Ellison (RA14326811), Private, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company B, 1st Battalion, 27th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division. Private Ellison distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces at Chon-ni, Korea, on 2 August 1950. While advancing with his company across a bridge west of Chung Chon-ni, Private Ellison spotted a group of the enemy in a gully attempting to flank the column. Realizing the danger, Private Ellison, not a squad leader, on his own initiative collected and led a squad, attacked, and destroyed this group. After advancing a short distance, the column was ambushed and received devastatingly accurate machine-gun, mortar, and 20-mm. fire from the front and flanks. An estimated one hundred enemy were in position on the right flank on top of a rolling cliff and their heavy fire was inflicting many casualties. Private Ellison ran to the base of the cliff and started climbing. This daring action inspired the platoon to follow, scale the cliff, and assault the hostile position. Reaching the top of the cliff, the platoon was pinned down by heavy enemy fire. Seeing this desperate situation, Private Ellison sprang up and dashed to the enemy's flank, where he laid down accurate enfilade fire on the position. Expending his ammunition, he continued to advance, throwing grenades that destroyed the machine-guns holding up the platoon's advance. Out of grenades, he ran to the platoon's position and, seizing an automatic rifle from a wounded comrade, returned to crest of the hill, firing as he ran. The tenacious fearlessness of this frontal assault in the face of overwhelming odds and the devastating accuracy of his fire completely disrupted the enemy. In this action he killed eighteen and routed the force, thereby enabling his platoon to take the hill and relieve the trapped column on the road below.
Department of the Army: General Orders No. 4 (February 7, 1951)
Home Town: Pickens, South Carolina

ELTHON, ELDON J.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Eldon J. Elthon, Sergeant First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Infantry Company. Sergeant First Class Elthon distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Pau-gol, Korea, on the morning of 18 July 1953. On that date, Sergeant Elthon was a member of a platoon which was advancing to reinforce a besieged United Nations outpost. When his platoon leader was wounded, Sergeant Elthon immediately assumed command and directed the advance of the unit until it was halted by the combined fire of approximately fifteen enemy troops entrenched in a bunker. Unable to call in artillery because of lack of communications and unwilling to risk the lives of his men by bringing them into the direct line of fire, Sergeant Elthon advanced on the enemy position alone. Completely ignoring the intense small-arms and mortar barrage, Sergeant Elthon crawled to the top of the bunker and threw hand grenades into the aperture. Sergeant Elthon then braved the bombardment and crawled back to his men to supervise the evacuation of the wounded and re-deploy his platoon. Again re-crossing the exposed area, he continued to throw hand grenades in the bunker. Sergeant Elthon's fearless actions were responsible for the death of several enemy. In addition, he forced the remainder of the enemy troops to leave the bunker and surrender, enabling his platoon to continue in its vital mission. The extraordinary heroism exhibited by Sergeant Elthon on this occasion reflects great credit on himself and is in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 980 (October 31, 1953)

EMERSON, JOHN E., JR.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to John E. Emerson, Jr., Captain (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as Commanding Officer of Company C, 1st Battalion, 23d Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division. Captain Emerson distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces near Kujan-dong, Korea, 26 November 1950. Captain Emerson, assigned the mission of attacking an enemy-held hill, led his men in seven daring charges against the enemy positions, inflicting heavy casualties on the hostile troops. As he was reforming his men for another charge, an estimated two enemy companies attacked the flanks of his unit. While repulsing this attack, Captain Emerson received orders to withdraw. Finding that the withdrawal route had been cut off by a third enemy company, he personally led his men in a bayonet assault on the hostile troops and broke through to a defensive position occupied by another company of the regiment and a platoon of tanks. When this position came under attack, Captain Emerson mounted one of the tanks and as enemy bullets ricocheted off the turret, fired the tank machine-gun with deadly accuracy until the supply of ammunition was exhausted. The resolute leadership and indomitable courage of Captain Emerson were instrumental in thwarting the attempts of the enemy to break through the defensive perimeter and encircle the friendly troops.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 330 (May 23, 1951)

ENSLEY, SHERMAN W.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Sherman W. Ensley, First Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving Commanding a Mortar Platoon of Company H, 2d Battalion, 38th Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division. First Lieutenant Ensley distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Kummul-gol, Korea, on 18 May 1951. On that date, the Mortar Platoon of Company H, commanded by Lieutenant Ensley, was surrounded by a numerically superior hostile force and cut off from the remainder of the battalion. Determined not to surrender nor to permit his weapons to fall into the hands of the enemy, he rallied his men and, heedless of the murderous hostile fire, led them in a daring breakthrough of the enemy encirclement. Upon rejoining his company, he found that he was the last remaining officer in the company and that much of the company equipment and several vehicles had been left in the previously-held positions. Quickly reorganizing the company, he led his men to the old positions, recovered the equipment and vehicles and several wounded men that had been left in the abandoned positions. Although constantly under intense enemy fire, Lieutenant Ensley successfully led his men back to the company assembly area and rejoined the battalion in its gallant stand which resulted in the infliction of staggering losses on the enemy and the subsequent dispersal of the hostile forces.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 475 (June 2, 1951)

*ERICKSON, ALBERT C.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Albert C. Erickson (ER17249047), Corporal, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company C, 1st Battalion, 7th Infantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division. Corporal Erickson distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Chungung-ni, Korea, on 14 February 1951. On that date, the 1st Battalion was attacked by an enemy force of numerical superiority and a squad that was serving as an outpost was subjected to an intense volley of fire which wounded all except one member. As the squad began withdrawing from its exposed, vulnerable position, it was harassed by enemy fire which threatened to sever its route. Corporal Erickson, from his position in the battalion perimeter saw the plight of the withdrawing squad and, with complete disregard for assault fire from an enemy group advancing on is position, shifted his line of fire to cover the movement of the beleaguered squad. This covering fire enabled the squad to withdraw to safety but in the course of the action, Corporal Erickson was hit by enemy fire and mortally wounded.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 318 (May 17, 1951)
Home Town: Otter Trail, Minnesota

ESPINOZA, VICTOR H.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Victor H. Espinoza, Corporal, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company A, 1st Battalion, 23d Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division. Corporal Espinoza distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces at Chorwon, Korea, on 1 August 1952. While spearheading an attack to secure "Old Baldy," Corporal Espinoza's unit was pinned down by withering artillery, mortar, and small-arms fire from strongly fortified positions. Fully aware of the odds against him, Sergeant Espinoza stormed forward in a daring assault and, firing his rifle and throwing grenades, silenced a machine-gun and its crew. Continuing up the fire-swept slope, he neutralized a mortar, wiped out two bunkers, and killed its defenders. After expending his ammunition, he employed enemy grenades, hurling them into the hostile trenches and inflicting additional casualties. Observing a tunnel on the crest of the hill which could not be destroyed by grenades, he obtained explosives, entered the tunnel, set the charge, and destroyed the tunnel and the troops it sheltered. His fearless display of valor inspired all who observed him and enabled the unit to continue the assault and to secure the strongpoint.
Department of the Army: General Orders No. 37 (April 29, 1953)

*ESTEP, EUGENE
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Eugene Estep (RA15378435), Private First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company H, 3d. Battalion, 187th Airborne Regimental Combat Team, 11th Airborne Division. Private First Class Estep distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Parun-ni, Korea on 25 March 1951. On that date, the machine-gun section of Company H, of which Private Estep was a member, was attached to Company G of the regiment to give supporting fire in repulsing a strong and determined enemy counterattack. When the section moved into position, the enemy immediately placed heavy, accurate fire on the machine-gun positions and launched several "banzai" attacks against the section in an effort to knock out all automatic weapons. During the charges, both the gunner and assistant gunner in Private Estep's squad were seriously wounded. Private Estep, an ammunition bearer, immediately manned the gun, single-handedly moved it to a new location, and opened fire from a flanking position which caught the enemy completely by surprise and inflicted heavy casualties on the attacking force, turning their attack into a complete rout. Heedless of his exposed position he remained in position firing until he was mortally wounded by enemy rifle fire. After the attack was repulsed and the position of the company secured, thirty enemy dead and twenty wounded were counted near Private Estep's position as a result of his deadly machine-gun fire.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 290 (May 8, 1951)
Home Town: Bracken, Kentucky

*ESTRADA, WILLIE N.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Willie N. Estrada (US54028427), Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving a Tank Commander with 245th Medium Tank Battalion, 45th Infantry Division. Sergeant Estrada distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Bongowol, Korea, on the night of 21 September 1952. On that night a probe by enemy units threatened the security of supporting tank positions on the left flank of a tactically important hill. Sergeant Estrada immediately maneuvered his tank into position and directed accurate machine-gun fire on the attacking foe. In the battle which followed, Sergeant Estrada was painfully wounded, but nevertheless continued to fire his weapon with deadly effectiveness. Swarming forward and surrounding the friendly position, the enemy peppered the tank with grenades, set demolition charges under the tracks, and fired down the gun tubes in an attempt to destroy the vehicle. As dawn approached the following morning the fire subsided, but a short time later the enemy once more converged on the tank. Again the crew directed accurate fire on the enemy before moving toward the base of the hill to rejoin friendly infantry units. While proceeding down the hazardous slope, the tank was hit by rocket fire, which disabled the vehicle and seriously wounded Sergeant Estrada. When one of the crew opened a hatch, the enemy hurled grenades through the opening. Although his arm and shoulder had been shattered and he had received several chest wounds, Sergeant Estrada picked up the missiles as they fell into the tank and threw them out of the vehicle. With rare courage, he continued to stave off his attackers until he succumbed to his wounds.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 687 (November 10, 1952)
Born: at Alamogordo, New Mexico
Home Town: Alamogordo, New Mexico

*ETIE, HERBERT J.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Herbert J. Etie (RA25927670), Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as Platoon Sergeant in an Infantry Company of the 32d Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division. Sergeant Etie distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Chg'u-dong, Korea, on 27 August 1951. On that date, Sergeant Etie was ordered to deploy his platoon along a strategic ridge to defend it against the fanatically determined hostile troops. Then men had just been positioned when the friendly perimeter was attacked by a numerically superior enemy force closely supported by heavy mortar and artillery fire. Because of the pressure of the overwhelming numbers of the enemy, the platoon began to become disorganized. Observing this, Sergeant Etie moved from man to man across the fire-swept terrain, encouraging them and directing their fire. When the enemy was on the point of overrunning the friendly positions, he gave the order for his men to fall back and he moved to the exposed ridge with an automatic-rifle in order to cover their withdrawal. Firing with deadly accuracy, Sergeant Etie inflicted numerous casualties among the enemy troops, effectively delaying them until his comrades had completed their withdrawal. Finally, with his ammunition expended, his position was overrun by hostile troops and he was mortally wounded. His courageous actions were responsible for saving the lives of many of his comrades.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 1001 (December 18, 1951)
Home Town: Harris, Texas

F

FALCONER, JOHN C.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to John C. Falconer, Corporal, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company F, 2d Battalion, 23d Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division. Corporal Falconer distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces near Changpong-ni, Korea, on 20 May 1951. Corporal Falconer was a squad leader in a platoon that had the mission of attacking high terrain held by a well-entrenched enemy force. As the platoon was about to launch its attack, three rounds of artillery fire burst in its midst, disrupting the confidence and morale of the men. Corporal Falconer, after artillery and air strikes had been delivered on the enemy positions, charged forward through withering hostile fire and tossed a grenade into an enemy machine-gun position, neutralizing it. This daring action so inspired members of the platoon that they followed him in his aggressive advance and, using grenades and rifle fire, inflicted heavy casualties on the hostile troops and secured the objective. Later, when the enemy counterattacked in overwhelming numbers, he obtained an automatic weapon and from an exposed position single-handedly covered the evacuation of the wounded and the withdrawal of his platoon. When an enemy group attempted to overrun his position, he raked them with fire, killing five and forcing the remainder to flee.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 1001 (December 18, 1951)

FALK, CHARLES A.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Charles A. Falk (RA19338089), Sergeant First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as an observer for an 81-mm. mortar platoon attached to Company K, 3d Battalion, 5th Regimental Combat Team, 1st Cavalry Division. Sergeant First Class Falk distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces near Kasan, Korea, on 28 November 1950. When a large enemy force assaulted the company's positions, he immediately called for mortar fire from the platoon and began adjusting the fire on the waves of attacking forces. While directing the fire on the enemy, he was seriously wounded in the back by enemy mortar fire. Completely disregarding his wounds and the increasing intensity of enemy activity, he steadfastly refused to leave his position although he was repeatedly urged to withdraw to the aid station for medical attention. Although Sergeant Falk later ceased to call for adjustment of fire and was subsequently listed as missing in action, his gallant and intrepid action in remaining in position and adjusting fire despite his wounds enabled the mortar platoon to deliver devastating fire on the waves of assaulting enemy troops.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 330 (May 23, 1951).
Home Town: Los Angeles, California

*FANCHER, MAXIE
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Maxie Fancher (ER14378523), Private First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company G, 2d Battalion, 5th Regimental Combat Team, 1st Cavalry Division. Private First Class Fancher distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Sohui-ryong, Korea, on 28 January 1953. On that date, Private Fancher was a member of a platoon that was overrun by the enemy. When enemy troops set up a machine-gun close to his position and opened fire on his comrades, Private Fancher, completely disregarding his own personal safety, unhesitatingly charged the machine-gun crew. He destroyed the crew and turned the weapon on the other enemy troops, inflicting heavy casualties. An enemy soldier fired at Private Fancher from the rear, killing him instantly.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 379 (April 11, 1953)
Home Town: Jefferson, Alabama

*FARABAUGH, CHARLES KOHL
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Charles Kohl Farabaugh (0-62695), First Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Headquarters Company, 1st Battalion, 17th Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division. First Lieutenant Farabaugh distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Haduch'on, Korea, on 17 July 1952. On that date, Lieutenant Farabaugh led a combat patrol deep into enemy-held territory for the purpose of locating and probing hostile troops. The patrol was surprised by a numerically superior enemy force and a fierce fire-fight ensued. During the battle, Lieutenant Farabaugh observed an element of the enemy force moving slowly to the left of the patrol's position in a flanking maneuver. After carefully estimating the situation, Lieutenant Farabaugh ordered the patrol to withdraw. He then moved from his protective cover through the intense enemy fire to a position from which he could cover the threatened flank. With complete disregard for his own safety, Lieutenant Farabaugh laid down such a withering hail of fire that the hostile forces were repelled. While he was covering the withdrawal of his patrol through the cleared sector, lieutenant Farabaugh was mortally wounded.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 502 (May 22, 1953)
Born: February 2, 1929 at Minneapolis, Minnesota
Home Town: Missoula, Montana

*FARRELL, JOSEPH E.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Joseph E. Farrell (ER33586170), Private First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company M, 3d Battalion, 17th Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division. Private First Class Farrell distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Chup'a-ri, Korea, on 3 September 1951. On that date, Company H was subjected to a surprise attack by a numerically superior and fanatically determined hostile force. Without regard for his personal safety, Private Farrell took an exposed position on the fire-swept terrain in order to contact the friendly forces in the area by radio and advise them of the situation. He remained at his post, completely ignoring the volume of enemy fire being concentrated on his position, until he was wounded and the radio destroyed. Because of the vast number of the enemy, the order for the friendly troops to take up more tenable positions was given. Private Farrell voluntarily remained behind as a rear guard to cover the withdrawal of his comrades and succeeded in inflicting numerous casualties among the enemy troops until he was killed by a burst of hostile fire. His fearless actions enabled his comrades to withdraw successfully and undoubtedly saved many of their lives.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 905 (November 16, 1951)
Home Town: Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

FELGER, ALAN C.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Alan C. Felger, Second Lieutenant (Field Artillery), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with a Field Artillery Battalion. Second Lieutenant Felger distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Sokkagae, Korea, on 23 March 1953. On that date, Lieutenant Felger was on a position which was assaulted by a numerically-superior enemy force. Displaying superior qualities of leadership and courage, Lieutenant Felger directed effective artillery fire on the advancing enemy. When his position became completely surrounded, Lieutenant Felger, though realizing the possible consequences of his action, called in variable time fire on his own position. For a five-hour period, Lieutenant Felger continued to direct fire on the position, moving among the men shouting words of encouragement and, ultimately, urging them into a counter-attack that was successful in repulsing the hostile assault.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 587 (June 21, 1953)

*FELHOELTER, HERMAN GILBERT (MIA)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Herman Gilbert Felhoelter (0-549715), Captain (Chaplain), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while attached to Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 19th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division. Captain (Chaplain) Felhoelter distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces on the Kum River, north of Taejon, Korea, on 16 July 1950. When seriously wounded men of the 19th Infantry could not be evacuated in the face of an overwhelming night attack by superior enemy forces who had cut off the main route of withdrawal, Chaplain Felhoelter, without regard for his own personal safety, voluntarily remained behind to give his wounded comrades spiritual comfort and aid. When last seen, Chaplain Felhoelter was still administering to the wounded.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 8 (July 24, 1950).
Home Town: Jefferson, Washington

*FERRIS, FRED G.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Fred G. Ferris (0-1317284), Captain (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as Commanding Officer of Company B, 1st Battalion, 7th Infantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division. Captain Ferris distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Chinch-on, Korea, on 3 and 4 July 1951. On the evening of 3 July 1951, Captain Ferris' company, given the mission of attacking and securing an enemy-held hill, launched a determined assault against the hostile positions. As the friendly troops reached the slope of the objective, a devastating volume of enemy fire pinned them down. Exposing himself to the intense fire, Captain Ferris, with complete disregard for his personal safety, moved among his men, reorganizing them in a skirmish line. Then, shouting words of encouragement to them he led the friendly troops in a fierce assault that drove the hostile troops from their positions and secured the objective. In the early morning hours of 4 July 1951, the defensive perimeter set up by Captain Ferris was attacked by the fanatically determined enemy. Again he exposed himself to the hostile fire in order to direct artillery fife against the on-rushing enemy troops. To stop the hostile force, Captain Ferris directed an artillery barrage to within a short distance of his own position. In the ensuing action the enemy assault was crushed by the heavy volume of artillery fire but Captain Ferris was killed by shrapnel from an artillery shell which fell near his command post. The extraordinary heroism and completely selfless devotion to duty displayed by Captain Ferris were directly responsible for repulsing the enemy attack.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 880 (November 12, 1951)
Home Town: Cuyahoga, Ohio

FINLEY, JOHN W.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to John W. Finley (RA07001030), Master Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company D, 1st Battalion, 21st Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division. Master Sergeant Finley distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces Chonji, Korea, on 10 July 1950. On this date, Sergeant Finley's Platoon was under extremely heavy attack by superior enemy forces supported by heavy artillery, tank and automatic weapons fire. Personnel of the Platoon began to withdraw and, seeing this, Sergeant Finley, in order to encourage his men to stay in their positions, secured a machine-gun from its mount, stood up, and without regard for his own safety, advanced alone on the enemy inflicting heavy casualties until the machine gun was knocked from his hands by a bullet. He then secured a rifle and continued effective fire on the enemy. By his aggressive leadership he encouraged the members of his platoon to hold their positions.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 27 (August 17, 1950)
Home Town: Jefferson, Alabama

*FINN, CLIFFORD C.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Clifford C. Finn (RA21904275), Private First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as a driver with Company B, 19th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division. Private First Class Finn distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces near Anju, Korea, on 4 November 1950. On that date, enemy forces in overwhelming numbers attacked positions held by Private First Class Finn's unit through wooded, hilly terrain. The enemy attack involved flanking and infiltrating movements, and was executed with speed and vigor in an attempt to encircle the positions. Private Finn, a driver, instantly manned the machine-gun mounted on his vehicle and delivered deadly accurate bursts of fire into the ranks of the advancing enemy, which for a few moments halted their advance in his sector. At this time, Private Finn started the vehicle, and despite the hail of small-arms fire delivered against him, drove it forward toward the enemy. He again manned his machine-gun and continued his deadly destruction of the enemy troops until mortally wounded, but in so doing, killed at least twenty-five enemy soldiers, and materially assisted in the defense of the company command post.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 78, (February 17, 1951)
Home Town: Cattaraugus, New York

FISHER, HENRY G.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Henry G. Fisher, Colonel (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as Commanding Officer of the 35th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division. Colonel Fisher distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the Republic of Korea on 24 September 1950. On the date, prior to an attack on Chinju by the 35th Infantry Regiment, one of the battalion commanders became ill and was evacuated. At this critical point, Colonel Fisher, without regard for his own safety and in the face of great personal danger, chose to accompany the battalion in an attack against the enemy over fifteen miles of very rugged, mountainous terrain. The execution of his skillful plan of attack coupled with the effect of his presence with the battalion, enabled that organization to attack and maneuver itself into a position from which it later surprised and completely overwhelmed the enemy force defending the city of Chinju. After advising and assisting the battalion commander in the advance unit, Colonel Fisher returned to his command post to join the other battalions of the combat team which he had been concurrently controlling. He then joined the lead battalion, which was attacking the city from another direction, where he exposed himself to constant enemy sniper fire in order to make a survey of a damaged bridge which was delaying the attack. Colonel Fisher's notable tactical ability and his personal example of courage while exposed to enemy fire served as a inspiration to the members of his command and provided an immeasurable contribution to the success of the Regimental Combat Team.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 136 (October 26, 1950)

FITZGERALD, CHARLES A.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Charles A. Fitzgerald, First Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company I, 3d Battalion, 7th Infantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division. First Lieutenant Fitzgerald distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Tongmang-ni, Korea, on 25 April 1951. On that date, Company I's positions were attacked and overrun by an overwhelmingly large enemy force. Realizing the seriousness of the situation, Lieutenant Fitzgerald voluntarily exposed himself to the heavy volume of enemy fire in order to shout encouragement to the small group of men around him. Quickly organizing the men into rifle squads, he deployed them in a skirmish line and then personally led them in a counterattack against the hostile elements, successfully recapturing the vital equipment which had been left behind when the positions were overrun. Throughout this entire action, he remained in an exposed position, effectively directing the fire of his men. When the company was finally ordered to withdraw to new defensive positions, Lieutenant Fitzgerald personally assured himself that the wounded and dead were evacuated.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 617 (August 5, 1951)

*FLANAGAN, EDWARD G.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Edward G. Flanagan (0-2021208), Second Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with 1st Battalion, 27th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division. Second Lieutenant Flanagan distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Satae-ri, Korea, on the morning of 13 October 1952. On that morning, Lieutenant Flanagan was leading a patrol in a raid on heavily fortified enemy positions on a tactically important hill. In the early stages of the assault, the friendly infantrymen were subjected to an intense volume of hostile small-arms, automatic weapons, and mortar fire. Painfully wounded in the abdomen, Lieutenant Flanagan refused to return to friendly lines. Instead, he continued to advance at the head of his men, leading them through a hail of fire to their objective. Then, while demolition crews placed explosive charges near the hostile fortifications, he charged forward alone in order to distract the enemy. Large numbers of hostile troops left their positions and swarmed towards him, but he single-handedly fought them back, killing at least five of the foe in a pitched, close-range battle. He continued to repulse the enemy until a hostile mortar round landed near his position, killing him instantly. Lieutenant Flanagan's extraordinary heroism and noble self-sacrifice enabled the patrol to accomplish hits mission.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 758 (December 9, 1952)
Home Town: Passaic, New Jersey

*FLEISCHMANN, RICHARD L.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Richard L. Fleischmann (RA19315957), Private First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as a Medical Aidman with the 23d Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division. Private First Class Fleischmann distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces near Changnyong, Korea, on 6 September 1950. On the afternoon of 6 September 1950, Private First Class Fleischmann was assigned as aidman to the machine-gun platoon of Company H, 23rd Infantry Regiment. One section of the platoon came under extremely heavy machine-gun and mortar fire and the section leader was wounded. In spite of concentrated enemy fire on the immediate area, Private Fleischmann ran forward to the gun position, removed the section leader to safety, and rendered medical treatment. A few moments later, the gunner of this weapon was also wounded, and once again he ran into point-blank machine-gun fire and removed this wounded man to safety. Although wounded on the second trip to the machine- gun position, he then took over the machine-gun and held off the enemy so that the remainder of the section could reorganize and move to a better position. He remained in position firing the machine-gun until he was killed.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 320 (May 17, 1951)
Home Town: Anaconda, Montana

FLERCHINGER, HUBERT P.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Hubert P. Flerchinger, Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company B, 1st Battalion, 7th Cavalry Regiment (Infantry), 1st Cavalry Division. Sergeant Flerchinger distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces near Wanjong-dong, Korea, on 10 and 11 September 1950. While his unit was defending a hill position it came under, and was pinned down by, intense enemy mortar, machine gun and small arms fire. In the ensuing action Sergeant Flerchinger moved about in the heavy enemy fire to successfully direct the defense of his platoon for more than six hours at which time the numerically superior enemy forced them to withdraw. Withdrawing to the base of the hill Sergeant Flerchinger immediately reorganized his forces and personally led them in a fierce counterattack which regained the summit despite bitter enemy resistance. While reestablishing a defense line in this position his unit was fired upon by a nest of enemy snipers which caused several casualties. Armed with only two hand grenades, Sergeant Flerchinger crawled forward to their position in an effort to destroy it. Finding ten enemy soldiers occupying the fox-hole, he engaged them, killing two and wounding three with his hand grenades and forcing four to flee. Grappling with the last remaining enemy in hand to hand combat, Sergeant Flerchinger lifted his opponent above his head, holding him in this position until he was shot by another soldier. Although severely mauled in the action Sergeant Flerchinger refused to be evacuated and remaining with his men effectively directed the successful defense of his regained position. Sergeant Flerchinger's fearless courage, inspiring aggressiveness, and superb leadership was responsible for inflicting heavy casualties upon the enemy and turned a possible defeat into victory. His extraordinary heroism reflects great credit on himself and the military service.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 41 (January 25, 1951)

*FLORES, MANUEL H., JR.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Manuel H. Flores, Jr. (RA19300786), Corporal, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as a flame-thrower operator with Company H, 3d Battalion, 23d Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division. Corporal Flores distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Chin-ag-ne, Korea, on 19 September 1951. On that date, a friendly force, arranged in a defensive perimeter in an area just taken from the enemy, was counterattacked by a numerically superior force of hostile troops. Corporal Flores observed several of his comrades become casualties from the intense enemy fire. Unhesitatingly he put his weapon aside and moved across the exposed terrain to aid them. After tending to the stricken men and assisting in their evacuation, Corporal Flores picked up a rifle and engaged the enemy. His unit fought furiously but, because of the overwhelming numbers of the enemy, it was ordered to withdraw to more tenable positions. Upon being informed of this, Corporal Flores voluntarily assumed command of a squad and led it to a site directly in the path of the on-rushing foe to fight a rear-guard covering action. From this point, his small group swept the enemy with a devastating fire, pinning them down momentarily and thus permitting the remainder of his unit to complete its withdrawal. Corporal Flores then ordered his squad to move to safety and, resisting all of his comrades' pleas to withdraw himself, he steadfastly remained at his post, delivering deadly accurate fire until his position was overrun and he was mortally wounded. As a result of his self-sacrifice, the friendly force was able to reestablish a defense line which saved it from possible annihilation.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 1020 (December 26, 1951)
Home Town: Los Angeles, California

FLOWERS, DONALD V.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Donald V. Flowers (RA15280847), Private First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company G, 2d Battalion, 19th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division. Private First Class Flowers distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces near Taejon, Korea, on 20 July 1950. On that date, Private First Class Flowers was in combat position with his platoon when it came under heavy enemy fire from small arms, automatic weapons, mortars and artillery. Men of the unit were pinned down by the intense fire, when an automatic rifleman was killed and his assistant wounded in attempting to return the fire. Private Flowers without regard for his own safety seized the weapon placing himself in an exposed position in order to obtain a field of fire and killed several enemy riflemen, remaining in position, he reloaded the automatic weapon and silenced an enemy machinegun, which was traversing the platoon area with heavy fire. Private Flowers continued his courageous performance until out of ammunition and ordered to withdraw. The extraordinary heroism employed by Private First Class Flowers on this occasion protected the lives of men in his adjacent units and reflected sterling credit on himself and the military service.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 77 (September 23, 1950)
Home Town: Fairfield, Ohio

FONTAINE, RICHARD R.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Richard R. Fontaine, Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as a Squad Leader with a platoon of Company K, 3d Battalion, 21st Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division. Sergeant Fontaine distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces near Pohang-dong, Korea, on 2 September 1950. Sergeant Fontaine led his squad in a company attack against a strongly fortified enemy hill position from which the enemy had an unobstructed view of the terrain over which the company advanced. Concurrent with the assault, the enemy opened heavy fire, wounding and killing many. Despite these discouraging reverses, Sergeant Fontaine sprang forward, urging the remainder of his men to continue pressing the attack. Disregarding his own painful and partially disabling wounds cause by the flying shrapnel, he steadfastly refused medical aid or evacuation, electing to remain with his unit. His progress hampered by an injured leg, he was some distance to the rear of his platoon when it was pinned down by heavy hostile automatic and artillery cross-fire. Ignoring his wounds and weakened condition from loss of blood, Sergeant Fontaine seized a light machine-gun and struggled forward to knock out two enemy machine-guns and their three-man crews. When a third machine-gun opened fire on his platoon, Sergeant Fontaine, disregarding a veritable hail of enemy bullets, dragged himself and his light weapon to a completely exposed position and successfully annihilated both the gun and its crew. Even then he refused evacuation and placed himself in a position where he could effectively cover his men until they completed entrenchment. He killed approximately nine of the enemy, and through his courageous leadership, superb personal bravery, and selfless devotion to the welfare of others, was principally responsible for maintaining the line and inspired his comrades to efforts which later resulted in seizure of the mountain stronghold.
General Headquarters Far East Command: General Orders No. 24 (February 5, 1951)

*FORRESTER, EMMETTE E.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Emmette E. Forrester (RA18102246), Corporal, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company F, 2d Battalion, 35th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division. Corporal Forrester distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces near Chirwan-ni, Korea, on 15 September 1950. While occupying a defensive position overlooking the Nam River, Company F was attacked by a numerically superior enemy force. Under cover of intense small-arms and automatic-weapons fire, the enemy approached within grenade distance of the company positions and succeeded in knocking out two friendly machine-gun emplacements. When it became apparent that the company would not be able to hold its position against the overwhelming enemy attack, the order was given for the company to withdraw. Corporal Forrester and a comrade volunteered to remain in position and cover the withdrawal. With complete disregard for his personal safety, he remained exposed to the deadly hail of enemy fire and courageously held the enemy at bay until he was killed.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 186 (April 4, 1951)
Home Town: Bexar, Texas

FOSTER, PAUL G.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Paul G. Foster, Corporal, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company F, 2d Battalion, 180th Infantry Regiment, 45th Infantry Division. Corporal Foster distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces at Sidamak, Korea, on 26 June 1952. On that date, Company F was attacking Hill 266 through a heavy barrage of small-arms, grenade, and mortar fire from well-entrenched enemy troops. The 2d platoon had pushed forward within thirty yards of the crest of the hill when it was halted by deadly fire from a reinforced machine-gun position on the left. Without hesitation, Corporal Foster ran within twenty feet of the gun position and attacked it with grenades. He continued his aggressive action for approximately fifteen minutes and finally silenced the gun. When a second gun opened fire on the right, he immediately raced across the open ground, vigorously pressed his grenade attack against the hostile emplacement, and hurled enemy grenades hack into their position in rapid succession. Although urged by his comrades to withdraw, he continued his bold attack for three hours, inflicting casualties on the enemy and silencing the gun. During this action, he was knocked unconscious by the explosion of a grenade which had become lodged on his bandoleer. His inspirational conduct and determined actions contributed materially to the successful accomplishment of his unit's mission.
Department of the Army: General Orders No. 30 (March 26, 1953)

FRALISH, JOHN C.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to John C. Fralish, Major (Field Artillery), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Headquarters, 503d Field Artillery Battalion, 2d Infantry Division. Major Fralish distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces at Ch'ongnyongch'am, Korea, on 30 November 1950 and 1 December 1950. When his battalion was cut off several miles behind enemy lines, surrounded and attacked from all sides by vastly superior numbers of enemy troops, Major Fralish took command of and led a successful attack to break out of the trap and thwart the enemy's plan to destroy the entire command. When the battalion's motorized column was halted by fanatical attacks at dusk, he voluntarily executed a detailed ground reconnaissance of enemy strength and locations, during which he was under intense enemy fire and suffered wounds three different times. Despite the heavy volume of mortar, machine-gun and small-arms fire from the surrounding hills, Major Fralish succeeded in emplacing a 155-mm. howitzer and took the enemy positions under direct fire, personally bore sighting the howitzer for each round, until enemy fire disabled the weapon and killed the cannoneer. He then ordered the antiaircraft self-propelled automatic weapons with the column to be brought forward and directed their fire on the targets he had located by reconnaissance. After neutralizing many of the enemy weapons and repelling several direct assaults on the head of the column, he gave orders to maintain fire on enemy positions and started organizing a convoy to move out at the opportune time. Ignoring the constant hail of mortar fire and bullets, Major Fralish moved confidently from place to place within the perimeter, pushing the self-propelled weapons forward, pointing out targets to be taken under fire, directing the clearing of burning and disable vehicles from the road, recruiting drivers to replace those who had been killed or wounded, directing the loading of those who were wounded onto the vehicles, and giving orders and instructions on every hand. Major Fralish continued to display such leadership, confidence, and valor that the men around him were imbued with his indomitable spirit until the disorganized group became in invincible fighting force. Thus inspired, hundreds of men rallied around him and placed a devastating volume of fire on the enemy positions as he directed. Finally the convoy fought a running fight for eight miles and broke clear of the enemy trap. Major Fralish's inspired leadership, combined with his absolute disregard for his own safety, and his extreme coolness under intense enemy fire were directly responsible for the success of the battalion in its mission.
Department of the Army: General Orders No. 51 (November 29, 1956)

FRANKLIN, JOSEPH ROSS
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Joseph Ross Franklin (0-0062893), First Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as Platoon Leader with an Infantry Company of the 7th Infantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division. First Lieutenant Franklin distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Sangwan-ni, Korea, on 6 July 1952. Late on that night, Lieutenant Franklin's platoon, occupying an outpost position on a tactically important ridge, was subjected to an intense artillery and mortar bombardment immediately followed by a smashing hostile attack. With complete disregard for his personal safety, Lieutenant Franklin moved from position to position through heavy fire, encouraging his men and directing their efforts as they fought to hold back the charging enemy waves. Learning that the perimeter had been breached and that a number of the enemy were in the outpost, he led a bayonet charge against the hostile troops. When the automatic rifle used by one of his men refused to function, he gave his carbine to the automatic rifleman, continuing to engage in the struggle with his pistol and grenades. As he led his men against the enemy, a hostile grenade hit him in the shoulder. Before the missile exploded, he pushed two comrades to the ground, enabling them to escape injury or death. When the first two friendly counterattacks failed to dislodge the foe, Lieutenant Franklin organized and led a third charge. Aggressively continuing to advance, even after the ammunition for his pistol had been expended, he killed three of the enemy with accurately hurled grenades. Under his leadership, his men succeeded in driving the hostile troops from the outpost and retained control of the tactically important position.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 141 (January 24, 1953)
Home Town: Denver, Colorado

FREEMAN, HERBERT W.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Herbert W. Freeman (RA16320649), Private First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company A, 1st Battalion, 9th Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division. Private First Class Freeman distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Agok, Korea, during the period from 1 through 7 September 1950. In the early morning hours of 1 September 1950, the enemy attacked with overwhelming forces the thinly held lines of the 9th Infantry Regiment. They overran the positions and were attempting to cut the Division's main supply route. Private Freeman was ordered by his company commander to take his squad and clean out an enemy force which had infiltrated to the rear of the positions held by Company A. Under his aggressive leadership the enemy force was attacked and fifteen enemy killed. A wounded American soldier being held by the enemy was also rescued. Private Freeman, realizing that the enemy might overrun the supply line, personally destroyed all the ammunition, supplies, and vehicles so completely that they would be of no use to the enemy. Upon his return to the company position he booby-trapped all paths leading to the company. On the night of 1 September 1950, Private Freeman was ordered to take care of four wounded men and to bring up the rear of the company as they withdrew to a better defensive position. During the night, Private Freeman and his squad of about fifteen men and four wounded men were cut off from the main body and forced to take cover in a rice paddy. For the next five days and nights he led his squad and the wounded through enemy-held territory, often under heavy fire. He always went ahead and scouted out the areas to assure the safety of the men with him and to avoid enemy positions. He continually administered to the needs of the wounded, provided food and water for all the men, and finally brought them all to the safety of their own lines. On the morning of 7 September 1950, he volunteered to join a patrol to search for some of the missing men of the company. The patrol was stopped by heavy enemy small-arms and machine-gun fire. Alone, he attacked the machine-gun position destroying the crew and the gun and was severely wounded in this action.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 187 (December 5, 1950)
Home Town: Leelanau, Michigan

FREEMAN, PAUL L.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Paul L. Freeman (0-17704), Colonel (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as Commanding Officer of the 23d Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division. Colonel Freeman distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of the Twin Tunnels area south of Chipyong-ni, Korea, during the period from 31 January 1951 through 15 February 1951. On 31 January 1951, Colonel Freeman was ordered to move his regimental combat team to the vicinity of the Twin Tunnels area south of Chipyong-ni and prevent the enemy from occupying the area. Colonel Freeman, with two battalions, entered the Twin Tunnels area without effecting contact with the enemy in the late afternoon of 31 January 1951. Realizing that the enemy forces were not yet emplaced, he deployed his troops in a tight defensive perimeter for the night. At 0450 hours on 1 February 1951, the enemy struck, pressing the attack with such fury that the regimental lines were penetrated in two places. The fighting was intense and the issue hung in the balance throughout the day; however, under the skillful leadership and personal example Colonel Freeman, the task force finally succeeded in routing the enemy at bayonet point, shattering two regiments of the 125th Chinese Communist Division. When the hostile force had been dispersed, 2,855 enemy dead were counted in front of the regimental positions. Reorganizing the combat team, Colonel Freeman led his command forward and occupied positions surrounding the town of Chipyong-ni, a critical point in the United Nations defense line. On the night of 13 February 1951, the enemy struck those positions with overwhelming fury, employing five divisions in the assault. For forty-eight hours the enemy pressed the attack, striking at all sides of the friendly perimeter and placing intense mortar end artillery fire on the positions. Skillfully directing the defense and personally exposing himself to the intense hostile fire to restore breaks in the line, Colonel Freeman so inspired his troops that they successfully routed the fanatically superior hostile force and counted over 5,000 enemy casualties surrounding their positions at the conclusion of the engagement. Although wounded in the final phase of the engagement, he reorganized the combat team and deployed it in defense of the secured area.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 379 (June 1, 1951)
Home Town: Roanoke, Virginia

FRITTS, BILLY E.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Billy E. Fritts (0-39276), Major (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with an Infantry Battalion of the 17th Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division. Major Fritts distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Sokkogae, Korea, on the afternoon of 11 July 1953. On that date, Major Fritts voluntarily elected to remain with a battalion which was relieving his unit in defense of an outpost. Recognizing the need for accurate artillery fire on the attacking enemy, Major Fritts proceeded through an intense barrage to an exposed observation post. While he was calling in effective fire on the hostile forces, his bunker was subjected to heavy shelling by a large caliber enemy gun. It was apparent that destruction of the bunker was inevitable, but Major Fritts, although knocked from his feet several times, continued to direct deadly fire into the ranks of the attacking force. A direct hit finally destroyed the bunker and Major Fritts was killed instantly. Through his courageous and completely selfless actions, Major Fritts had inflicted heavy casualties on the enemy and contributed materially to the successful evacuation of the position and the saving of many lives.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 910 (October 5, 1953)
Home Town: Cumberland, North Carolina

G

GAINOK, ELMER J.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Elmer J. Gainok, Second Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as a weapons platoon leader with Company K, 3d Battalion, 21st Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division. Second Lieutenant Gainok distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces at Chonji, Korea, on 11 July 1950. On that date, Lieutenant Gainok had personnel of the platoon deployed as riflemen in a defensive position when he noted one of the front line platoons had been penetrated by superior enemy forces. He regrouped his platoon and launched a counter attack. The platoon had advanced approximately fifty yards when it was halted by extremely heavy machine-gun fire from the flank. Without regard for his personal safety, Lieutenant Gainok charged the enemy positions with hand grenades and his rifle. His expert use of grenades and the accurate fire from his rifle killed or wounded many of the enemy and caused the rest to flee, abandoning their weapons. He then placed his platoon in the gap left by the overrun platoon thereby consolidating the company's lines. By his aggressive leadership he consolidated the company's lines and saved the position from being overrun.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 29 (August 19, 1950)

*GAINS, CHARLES
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Charles Gains (RA13257511), Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company E, 2d Battalion, 27th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division. Sergeant Gains distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces at Hwanggan, Korea, on 25 July 1950. Sergeant Gains, with complete disregard for his own personal safety, seeing that the automatic rifleman of his assaulting squad was wounded, immediately grabbed the automatic rifle and continued to attack. Although Sergeant Gains was wounded, he continued to attack, firing as he moved forward until he became so weak he fell to his knees. Sergeant Gains, mortally wounded, remained in position firing when the platoon received orders to withdraw and covered their withdrawal. His heroic action and calmness under heavy enemy fire inflicted heavy casualties on the enemy and permitted the platoon to execute an orderly withdrawal. Sergeant Gains failed to return to friendly lines.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 19, (January 12, 1951)
Home Town: Harrison, West Virginia

GALLARDO, ROBERT
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Robert Gallardo (0-2262267), Second Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as a Platoon Leader with Company E, 2d Battalion, 9th Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division. Second Lieutenant Gallardo distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Ku-Jang-Dong, Korea, on the night of 25 - 26 November 1950. On that night, Company E bore the brunt of an attack by a large and determined hostile force. Although wounded early in this attack, Lieutenant Gallardo remained constantly with his platoon, encouraging his men and repeatedly exposing himself to the devastating enemy fire in order to go to the aid of the wounded. In the early morning hours, the enemy launched a fanatical mass attack that forced Lieutenant Gallardo's platoon to withdraw part way down the slope. Immediately, he reorganized his men and led them in a counterattack, regaining the lost ground. In this action the company commander was seriously wounded and Lieutenant Gallardo, after personally evacuating him, took command of the company. Upon receiving orders to withdraw to better defensive positions, he recovered an abandoned truck and supervised the evacuation of all wounded personnel. Only after he was assured that the entire company had successfully moved to the new positions, did he allow himself to be evacuated for medical treatment. The selfless devotion to duty and extraordinary heroism displayed by Lieutenant Gallardo in this action reflect great credit upon himself and are in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 631 (August 11, 1951)
Born: October 29, 1921 at Tampa, Florida
Home Town: New York, New York

GALLIMORE, DAN L.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Dan L. Gallimore, Private First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as an automatic rifleman of an Infantry Company. Private First Class Gallimore distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Songnae-dong, Korea, on 11 June 1953. On that morning Private Gallimore was part of a company which was reinforcing an outpost under intense hostile attack. With total disregard or his personal safety, Private Gallimore proceeded through the intense barrage to the enemy-occupied forward positions and placed effective fire on the hostile troops. When a shell burst shattered his rifle, Private Gallimore unhesitatingly secured another weapon and continued to perform his mission until the enemy force overran the United Nations position. Noticing several hostile troops in a nearby bunker, Private Gallimore advanced, threw several grenades into the aperture, and annihilated the occupants. Upon returning to his former post, he saw a group of enemy troops advancing on two aid men who were caring for the wounded. Completely ignoring the great odds, Private Gallimore charged forward, firing his weapon with great accuracy, and dispatched the foe. He then remained in the area until the enemy had been completely routed.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 66 (February 21, 1954)

*GALLUP, WILLIAM E.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to William E. Gallup (RA37862735), Sergeant First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company D, 1st Battalion, 27th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division. Sergeant First Class Gallup distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces near Haman, Korea, on 3 September 1950. As section leader of a heavy machine-gun section, Sergeant Gallup discovered one of his machine-guns threatened by an enemy force which had infiltrated through friendly lines. Sergeant Gallup, armed with only a pistol and hand grenades, went forward alone under intense enemy small-arms and automatic weapons fire with complete disregard for his own personal safety and killed an estimated six enemy soldiers, harassing and neutralizing the enemy until mortar fire could be adjusted on the hill. In this action, Sergeant Gallup gallantly sacrificed his life, but not until his ferocious single-handed assault on the enemy had resulted in his company being able to hold a vital position.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 388 (June 2, 1951)
Home Town: Wright, Missouri

GARCIA, ELISEO
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Eliseo Garcia (RA18253274), Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company L, 3d Battalion, 23d Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division. Sergeant Garcia distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Changnyong, Korea, on 16 September 1950. The platoon of which Sergeant Garcia was a member, while participating in a drive to the Naktong River, came under vicious fire from two hostile machine-guns which caused the men to falter and pinned them down. Sergeant Garcia leaped to his feet, pushed across the fire-swept area to the emplacement on the left flank, successfully silenced the gun, and killed the crew with his grenades. Ignoring a painful wound sustained in this same action, he again rushed through withering fire to the emplacement on the right flank of his platoon and neutralized the second gun and its crew with grenades. As a result of his heroic action, eight of the enemy were killed, the defense of the opposition was broken, and his inspired comrades continued the advance with such intensity that the objective was expeditiously taken with a minimum of casualties to his unit.
Department of the Army: General Orders No. 85 (September 25, 1951)
Home Town: Bernalillo, New Mexico

*GARDNER, LAWRENCE N.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Lawrence N. Gardner (RA11143331), Corporal, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company G, 3d Battalion, 187th Airborne Regimental Combat Team, 11th Airborne Division. Corporal Gardner distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Parun-ni, Korea, on 28 March 1951. On that date, Company G was assigned the mission of capturing Hill 507, a hostile strong point. As the company approached the summit of the hill, the stubbornly resisting enemy began tossing hand grenades among the friendly troops. Seeing the grenades fall among his comrades, Corporal Gardner, with complete disregard for his personal safety, and with heroic determination to save the lives of his gravely endangered comrades, began hurling them back into the enemy positions. He succeeded in recovering two of the grenades and throwing them at the enemy and was attempting to throw a third grenade toward an enemy entrenchment when it exploded in his hand, killing him instantly.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 527 (July 9, 1951)
Home Town: Franklin, Vermont

*GARRIGUS, CHARLES
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Charles Garrigus (RA35968746), Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Headquarters Company, 1st Battalion, 32d Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division. Sergeant Garrigus distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces near the Chosin Reservoir in North Korea, during the period 27 November 1950 through 1 December 1950. On the night of 27 November 1950, the battalion, in the defensive positions on the eastern shore of the Chosin Reservoir, was subjected to numerous attacks and probing actions by a numerically superior and ruthless foe. Ordered to withdraw the following morning, the troops traveled approximately one mile over open road and across a bridge. Sergeant Garrigus, assistant motor sergeant, observing two loaded ammunition and ration trucks abandoned on the roadway, decided to return for them. After driving his vehicle to friendly lines, he dashed across approximately three hundred yards of open, snow-covered ice and, bringing one truck across, immediately returned for the other. Bullet-riddled by hostile fire, the second truck stalled as it entered the friendly perimeter but, through Sergeant Garrigus' quick thinking and intrepid actions, the critical supplies were withdrawn from the very grasp of the enemy. During the ensuing two days the unit withstood successive assaults and, on 1 December 1950, the enemy made two attempts to break through a friendly roadblock to position a captured machine-gun which was being employed against a convoy of wounded personnel. Sergeant Garrigus rallied a group of soldiers and, in a daring charge regained the machine-gun, one automatic rifle, and several other machine-guns with ammunition and immediately turned them on the enemy, killing approximately sixty and wounding many others. Subsequently, at a bypass where a bridge had been blown out, Sergeant Garrigus, under intense enemy fire, drove several trucks across and out of a deep mud hole in the bed of the steam. Later, while driving the lead truck in a final attempt to break through an enemy roadblock, Sergeant Garrigus was mortally wounded by hostile fire.
General Headquarters Far East Command: General Orders No. 201 (August 7, 1951)
Home Town: Gibson, Indiana

GARTEN, MELVIN
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Melvin Garten, Captain (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company K, 3d Battalion, 31st Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division. Captain Garten distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces near Surang-ni, Korea, on 30 October 1952. On that date, observing that assault elements of Companies F and G were pinned down by withering fire on a dominant hill feature, Captain Garten voluntarily proceeded alone up the rugged slope and, reaching the besieged troops, found that key personnel had been wounded and the unit was without command. Dominating the critical situation through sheer force of his heroic example, he rallied approximately eight men, assigned four light machine guns, distributed grenades and, employing the principle of fire and maneuver, stormed enemy trenches and bunkers with such tenacity that the foe was completely routed and the objective secured. Quickly readying defensive positions against imminent counterattack he directed and coordinated a holding action until reinforcements arrived. Major Garten's inspirational leadership, unflinching courage under fire and valorous actions reflect the highest credit upon himself and are in keeping with the cherished traditions of the military service.
Department of the Army: General Orders No. 59 (August 4, 1953)

*GASQUET, ANDREW JOHN, JR. (MIA)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Andrew John Gasquet, Jr. (RA18329480), Private First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as a light machine-gunner in the 3d platoon, Company G, 2d Battalion, 9th Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division. Private First Class Gasquet. distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Kunu-ri, Korea, on 26 November 1950. On that date, constant enemy mortar fire enabled the enemy to penetrate the right flank of the company in the 3d platoon sector, forcing one squad to withdraw, thus leaving Private Gasquet and his machine-gun in an exposed position. By the time a secondary defense line was established by the squad which withdrew, the entire platoon area became untenable and the company commander ordered them to consolidate with the 2d platoon on their left. Private Gasquet elected not to withdraw in order to cover with machine-gun fire the movement of his platoon to their new position. The movement was accomplished with minimum casualties due to the accurate fire delivered by Private Gasquet. He continued to fire until his position was overrun by the enemy and shortly after, the company was forced to abandon their defenses. His intense devotion to members of his platoon was clearly demonstrated by his voluntary action of remaining behind to cover their withdrawal.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 139 (March 13, 1951)
Home Town: Baton Rouge, Louisiana

GATSIS, ANDREW J.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Andrew J. Gatsis, Captain (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as Commanding Officer of Company K, 3d Battalion, 179th Infantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division. Captain Gatsis distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Songnae-dong, Korea, on 25 December 1952. On that date, hostile forces launched a series of fanatical attacks on that part of the main line of resistance where Captain Gatsis' company was situated. The intensity of the assault and the numerical superiority of the enemy forced the friendly elements to withdraw. Captain Gatsis reorganized the company and personally led a spirited counter-attack, which was halted by extensive mortar, automatic weapons, and small-arms fire. Captain Gatsis, disregarding his own safety, moved across open terrain under the heavy barrage to call for reinforcements. Upon his return he again exposed himself to hostile fire and moved among the men, encouraging them and reorganizing the ranks for another attack. Captain Gatsis then led the assault into the enemy ranks, engaging them in bitter hand-to-hand combat, personally killing one enemy soldier and wounding several others. He then organized the remainder of the force for a final assault, which repelled the enemy and regained control of the position.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 451 (May 3, 1953)

GAY, HOBART R.
(Second Award)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting a Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster in lieu of a Second Award of the Distinguished Service Cross to Hobart R. Gay, Major General, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while as Commanding General of the 1st Cavalry Division. Major General Gay distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the Republic of Korea during the period from 18 July to 1 October 1950. During this period, although faced by overwhelming numerical superiority, General Gay so skillfully led his Division that the enemy's advance was slowed and ultimately halted along the Naktong River Line. His continuous presence at the front under enemy artillery, mortar, and small-arms fire with total disregard for his own personal safety was an inspiration to his men during the critical period of the United Nations buildup. On 25 September 1950, the Division made a break-through at Tabu-dong. General Gay joined the task force formed to exploit the success, placing his quarter-ton vehicle behind the two leading tanks, taking part in numerous firefights. In one instance the lead tank was hit by enemy antitank fire, halting the column. Realizing the seriousness of the situation and the necessity for pushing forward, General Gay made his way under enemy fire to the lead tank and personally directed accurate fire at the enemy antitank guns, which eliminated them. His aggressive leadership, courage under fire, and personal heroism, enable the task force to continue its rapid advance and prevented the enemy from organizing a defensive position which would have nullified the breakthrough.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 109 (October 10, 1950)
Born: May 16, 1894 at Rockport, Illinois
Other Award: Distinguished Service Cross (WWII)

*GENDUSA, FRANK J.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Frank J. Gendusa (US54032485), Private First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company B, 1st Battalion, 38th Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division. Private First Class Gendusa distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces at Mandae-ri, Korea, on 1 September 1951. On that date, Company B launched an assault on a heavily defended, enemy-held hill. The squad in which Private Gendusa was an assistant automatic rifleman came under fire from two concealed enemy snipers which pinned the unit down. Without hesitation, he voluntarily charged forward, storming the sniper's position with grenades, destroying it, and killing two enemy soldiers who had pinned down his squad. While eliminating the enemy snipers, he also killed two other enemy soldiers who jumped from behind cover and fired on him. Returning to the foxhole in which he and several comrades had taken cover from the enemy fire, he proceeded to reorganize and prepare them to resume the advance when he was mortally wounded by an enemy grenade. His unhesitating and courageous actions were an inspiration to his comrades and made it possible for the attack to move forward again and for the mission to be successfully accomplished.
Department of the Army: General Orders No. 12 (January 22, 1953)
Home Town: St. Charles, Louisiana

*GEVARA, ALBERT JOSE
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Albert Jose Gevara (RA17092458), Corporal, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with 1st Battalion, 29th Regimental Combat Team, 24th Infantry Division. Corporal Gevara distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces near Sobuk-San, Korea, on 17 September 1950. On that date, Corporal Gevara's platoon was committed in support of another company whose casualties had been high. During the night the positions occupied by the platoon came under heavy attack by artillery, mortar, small-arms and repeated banzai charges. These attacks resulted in the platoon sergeant and platoon officer being wounded, which left all of the men in a highly nervous and shaken condition. Finally, at about 1500 on 17 September 1950, the platoon was driven from its position by an overwhelming enemy force. Corporal Gevara, although not the senior non-commissioned officer present, noted that the men were bewildered, confused, and completely disorganized, and used great initiate by assuming the leadership of the remnants of the platoon. Gathering a group of about twenty-five men together, he reorganize the platoon into a cohesive fighting force. Re-supplying them with ammunition, he checked to see that none were wounded. Finding one machine-gun had a malfunction, he restored it to an operating condition. In addition, upon being informed of a wounded man that had been left behind, he fearlessly crawled into enemy held territory and dragged the wounded man back to safety. When all preparations had been completed, he moved out ahead of his men in an assault on the enemy. The small group of men were inspired to a maximum effort despite the heavy enemy fire and drove the enemy from the hill, securing the area previously held by the platoon. After the platoon was organized on this position, Corporal Gevara suddenly collapsed. It was discovered at this time that he had been seriously wounded in the stomach and leg at the same time that his platoon leader was hit.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 49 (January 31, 1951)
Home Town: Denver, Colorado

*GIBSON, AUBREY LEE
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Aubrey Lee Gibson (RA18107630), Corporal, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Battery A, 555th Field Artillery Battalion, 5th Regimental Combat Team, 1st Cavalry Division. Corporal Gibson distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces near Pongam-ni, Korea, on 12 August 1950. On that date, numerically superior enemy forces, supported by heavy mortar and artillery fire, launched an attack against the position of Battery A. Without regard for his personal safety and despite the heavy fire, Corporal Gibson secured a 3.5 rocket launcher, moving forward to an exposed position to deliver fire on the advancing enemy. He destroyed three machine-gun nests before exhausting his ammunition. He then moved to a 50 caliber machine-gun mounted on a truck and continued to direct accurate fire on the enemy until he was wounded by an antitank shell. When the position was overrun, forcing a withdrawal, Corporal Gibson could not be located.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 68 (September 15, 1950)
Home Town: McCulloch, Texas

GIESEMANN, JOSEPH V., JR.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Joseph V. Giesemann, Jr. (0-446438), Captain (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Commanding Company F, 2d Battalion, 31st Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division. Captain Giesemann distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces at Kumhwa, Korea, on 15 October 1952. On that date, after consolidating on a key terrain feature, Captain Giesemann's company readied defensive positions against imminent counterattack. At approximately 2130 hours, hostile soldiers swarmed up a finger approach to the hill leading to emplacements occupied by the 3d platoon. Observing that the unit was in grave danger of being isolated and overrun, Captain Giesemann hurriedly left the command post, raced across the open fire-swept impact area to a point forward of the threatened platoon, and engaged the foe in a diverting maneuver. Firing his carbine and throwing grenades with deadly accuracy, he delayed the onslaught until the beleaguered platoon effected a retrograde movement to a more tenable position, and then quickly withdrew to the safety of friendly lines. His unflinching courage and intrepid actions exacted a toll of approximately twenty casualties and thwarted the enemy's attempt to regain the commanding ground, thereby reflecting the highest credit on himself and upholding the highest traditions of the military service.
Department of the Army: General Orders No. 72 (September 23, 1953)
Home Town: New Orleans, Louisiana

GILCHRIST, PHILIP J.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Philip J. Gilchrist, First Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as a Platoon Leader in Company G, 2d Battalion, 27th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division. First Lieutenant Gilchrist distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces near Yongju, Korea, on 30 March 1951. On that date, Lieutenant Gilchrist was leading his platoon toward their objective, a high mountain peak occupied by a numerically superior enemy force. As he neared the top of this rugged mountain peak, Lieutenant Gilchrist single-handedly engaged seven enemy soldiers and killed them, enabling his men to move forward to the crest and take the position. Before the men could be properly deployed, a strong enemy counterattack was launched. Exposing himself to the intense enemy fire, Lieutenant Gilchrist skillfully directed the defensive actions of his platoon and the enemy were repulsed. Although painfully wounded during this action, he refused medical aid and continued to direct the fire of his men, successfully repelling two more enemy counterattacks. When orders were received to withdraw, Lieutenant Gilchrist remained with a small group to conduct a delaying action until the wounded were evacuated, then covered the withdrawal of the remainder of the group. The resolute leadership, indomitable courage and selfless devotion to duty of Lieutenant Gilchrist reflect great credit on himself and are in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 359 (May 27, 1951)

*GILMORE, KNOTS
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Knots Gilmore (RA13321834), Private, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company K, 3d Battalion, 7th Infantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division. Private Gilmore distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Hill 347 in Korea, on 30 March 1951. On that date, a numerically superior enemy force launched a fierce attack against defensive positions held by Private Gilmore's platoon. During the engagement, a grenade thrown by an enemy soldier landed within a few yards of Private Gilmore's emplacement. Realizing that the grenade was a serious threat to the lives of two of his comrades who were nearby and unaware of the danger, Private Gilmore, with complete disregard for his personal safety, unhesitatingly attempted to seize the grenade and throw it from the position. As he did this, the grenade exploded, mortally wounding him.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 380 (June 1, 1951)
Home Town: Buchanan, Virginia

GIVIDEN, GEORGE MASSIE, JR.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to George Massie Gividen, Jr. (0-64146), First Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with 14th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division. First Lieutenant Gividen distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Satae-ri, Korea, on 12 October 1952. On that date, a volunteer patrol was organized under the leadership of Lieutenant Gividen for the purpose of destroying an enemy outpost. As the patrol approached the outpost under the cover of dusk, it received hostile fire from a hillside bunker and several dug in positions. Lieutenant Gividen was advancing toward the bunker through intense machine gun and grenade fire when he was severe wounded by a grenade exploding between his legs. With both legs broken, he continued his advance by crawling towards and simultaneously firing his carbine into the enemy positions. Lieutenant Gividen killed a charging enemy soldier with his carbine and launched a rain of grenades into the hostile positions. At this time he was wounded a second time by an exploding, white phosphorous grenade. Realizing that his group was very vulnerable, he crawled to a position which was parallel to the enemy locations and poured devastating fire into them. He was again attacked by an enemy soldier with a sub-machine gun who wounded him a third time. Killing his attacker, Lieutenant Gividen continued his assault until his ammunition was expended. While returning to his patrol, he collapsed from shock and loss of blood. Inspired by Lieutenant Gividen's heroic example the patrol fought off the enemy as they left their positions, while one member of the patrol pulled Lieutenant Gividen back into the patrol perimeter. Having regained consciousness, he again assumed command, setting up a security guard and personally acting as rear guard during the evacuation of all the other wounded of his unit. When approaching friendly lines the group was brought under heavy enemy mortar fire, wounding Lieutenant Gividen for the fourth time in the neck and the shoulder. Lieutenant Gividen's patrol successfully neutralized the enemy outpost and returned to friendly lines with all their wounded, thus preventing any loss of American lives. The extraordinary heroism exhibited by Lieutenant Gividen on this occasion reflects great credit on himself and is in keeping with the finest traditions of the military service.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 649 (September 27, 1954)
Home Town: Jefferson, Kentucky

GLAZE, J. R.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to J. R. Glaze (RA18213079), Master Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as a member of Company A, 78th Heavy Tank Battalion, 24th Infantry Division. Master Sergeant Glaze distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces near Chochiwon, Korea, on 10 July 1950. On this date, Sergeant Glaze, Tank Commander of a light tank, engaged a much heavier enemy T-34 Tank. Seeing that the 75-mm. ammunition with which his tank was equipped had no effect on the heavier tank, he left his tank to procure a rocket launcher from friendly infantry. Having procured a rocket launcher he advanced to within 25 yards of the enemy tank and destroyed it. He then moved forward eighty yards under heavy enemy small arms fire and destroyed a second tank. During this action he was severely wounded. The extraordinary heroism displayed by Master Sergeant Glaze on this occasion reflects the highest credit on himself and the military service.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 54 (September 6, 1950)
Home Town: Cass, Texas

GODFREY, JAMES H.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to James H. Godfrey (RA34336921), Corporal, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as a gunner with a 75-mm. recoilless rifle squad which was part of Company D, 1st Battalion, 32d Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division. Corporal Godfrey distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces near Hagaru-ni, Korea, Korea, on 28 and 29 November 1950. At approximately 0200 hours on the morning of 28 November 1950, Private Godfrey fearlessly engaged two enemy tanks and destroyed them. At this juncture his section was attacked by an estimated one hundred fanatical troops from a distance of only forty to fifty yards. Private Godfrey brought his gun to bear on this new enemy threat and delivered a withering hail of fire, killing most of them and dispersing the remainder. Later in the morning, Private Godfrey moved his gun to another position and successfully neutralized an enemy mortar. After this action he returned to his original location and courageously assisted in repulsing five more vicious onslaughts. On 29 November 1950 the enemy, attacking in overwhelming force, captured the only other 75-mm. recoilless rifle in the unit. During the ensuing action Private Godfrey's point-blank fire demolished the gun and killed its crew. Private Godfrey's ammunition was expended in this encounter and the platoon reduced to three men. After securing his gun on a truck, Private Godfrey climbed atop a motor vehicle exposed to murderous enemy fire and continued his ferocious fight. Firing his rifle and throwing grenades with deadly accuracy, he killed several more of the stubborn foe and greatly assisted in the orderly withdrawal of his company.
General Headquarters Far East Command: General Orders No. 129 (May 21, 1951)
Home Town: Houston, Alabama

GOETZ, ELMER O.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Elmer O. Goetz, Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Battery C, 49th Field Artillery Battalion, 7th Infantry Division. Sergeant Goetz distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Hwachon, Korea, on 29 May 1951. On that date, Sergeant Goetz was a member of an artillery forward observer party that was directing supporting fire for Company L, 17th Infantry Regiment. In the early morning hours, the company's positions were attacked by vast numbers of the enemy, and the friendly troops were forced to execute a limited withdrawal. During this assault, Sergeant Goetz remained with members of the forward observer party, providing protection for them as they directed artillery fire on the advancing hostile troops. Although his position exposed him to the fire of two enemy machine-guns and enemy troops who were approaching from both flanks, Sergeant Goetz continued to fire his carbine at the hostile force, killing three of the enemy at close range. Upon being ordered to withdraw, he observed that the radio operator of the party had been wounded and was lying in an exposed area. With complete disregard for his personal safety, Sergeant Goetz ran across the fire-swept terrain and carried his wounded comrade approximately 1,500 yards to safety, despite the heavy volume of enemy fire concentrated on him. After evacuating his comrade, he returned to his position and voluntarily participated in the counterattack that regained the lost ground from the hostile force.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 771 (October 15, 1951)

*GOLDSTEIN, LAWRENCE
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Lawrence Goldstein (US51104128), Private, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company I, 3d Battalion, 23d Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division. Private Goldstein distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces at Sat'ae-ri, Korea, on the night of 9 - 10 October 1951. As point man in his unit's night assault against heavily fortified enemy positions on "Heartbreak Ridge," Private Goldstein encountered and killed two hostile soldiers manning a listening post before they could spread the alarm. Upon nearing the objective, he accidentally stepped on an enemy mine and suffered serious injuries. The explosion of the mine alerted the enemy, who brought intense small-arms and grenade fire upon the unit and forced its withdrawal. Severely wounded in his legs and head and unable to move, Private Goldstein endured the cold of the long night and, when his unit resumed the attack the next morning, he roused himself to warn his comrades of the mine field and to point out the location of two concealed enemy positions, Although he died while being moved to an aid station, his heroic conduct and indomitable spirit will always be an inspiration to those who knew him best.
Department of the Army: General Orders No. 64 (June 30, 1952)
Home Town: Kings, New York

*GOMBOS, NICHOLAS N. (MIA)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Nicholas N. Gombos (0-63100), Captain (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company F, 2d Battalion, 38th Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division. Captain Gombos distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces near Unbong-dong, Korea, on 26 and 27 November 1950. On that date, Captain Gombos' company was occupying a front of more than 2000 yards in rugged mountainous terrain with under strength platoons deployed several hundred yards apart to cover all natural routes of enemy approach. At approximately 2320 hours, the enemy attacked in great strength, encircling the two forward platoons, overrunning the right flank of the support platoon, and subjecting the command post to heavy mortar, machine-gun and small-arms fire. After reconnoitering the situation, Captain Gombos radioed his battalion commander for assistance and then, traversing the line of the support platoon, rallied and led an inspirational counterattack to reestablish the right flank. Returning to the command post, he organized all available men and rushed them into the line to reinforce the support platoon. When the mortar platoon leader was wounded, Captain Gombos ordered the 60-mm. mortars moved to his command post and, calmly directing retaliation fire, inflicted heavy casualties and repulsed the attack. Following this action, enemy counter-mortar fire neutralized the 60-mm. mortars, wounding several men. On 27 November 1950, at approximately 0200 hours, the enemy secured the crest of a high hill on the extreme right flank of the company, overlooking the command post, and brought three mortars to bear on the company's 81-mm. mortars, neutralizing them and leaving the company without mortar support. Captain Gombos constantly braved withering fire as he moved among his men, directing and encouraging them and, dominating and controlling the critical situation through sheer force of his heroic example, succeeding in warding off the enemy throughout the night. At daybreak, Captain Gombos rallied and regrouped his depleted unit and led it in a daring, determined attack against the newly-acquired hostile positions, routing the enemy from the hill and regaining the strategic strongpoint.
General Headquarters Far East Command: General Orders No. 223 (September 2, 1951)
Home Town: Kern, California

GOMEZ, EDUARDO C.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Eduardo C. Gomez (RA18157039), Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company I, 3d Battalion, 8th Cavalry Regiment (Infantry), 1st Cavalry Division. Sergeant Gomez distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces at Tabu-dong, Korea, on 3 September 1950. While readying defensive positions, Sergeant Gomez' company was ruthlessly attacked at approximately 0100 hours by a hostile force comprising an infantry regiment and spearheaded by two T-34 tanks, the foremost of which moved to within seventy-five yards of the command post before it was immobilized by rocket fire, but its main battery and machine-guns continued to rake the company perimeter with devastating fire. Realizing the tank posed a serious threat to the entire perimeter, Sergeant Gomez voluntarily, and fully aware of the odds against him, crawled thirty yards across an open rice field vulnerable to enemy observation and fire, boarded the tank, and, prying open one of the hatches on the turret, dropped an activated grenade into the hull, killing the crew. Wounded in the left side while returning to his position, he refused to be evacuated. Observing that the tripod of a .30 caliber machine-gun was rendered inoperable by enemy fire, he cradled the weapon in his arms, returned to the forward defensive positions, and swept the assaulting force with withering fire. Although his weapon overheated and burned his hands and his painful wound still bled, he maintained his stand and, upon orders to withdraw in the face of overwhelming enemy superiority, remained to provide protective fire. Then, retiring slowly, he continued to pour accurate fire into the ranks of the enemy, which exacted a heavy toll in casualties and retarded the enemy's advance. Sergeant Gomez would not consent to leave his post for medical attention until the company established a new defensive positions.
War Department General Orders No. 102 (November 27, 1951)

GONSALEZ, FLORENTINO (POW)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Florentino Gonsalez (RA12299298), Private First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with the Company B, 1st Battalion, 21st Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division. Private First Class Gonsalez distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces near Chonan, Korea, on 5 July 1950. During an enemy attack which had been in progress for a period of seven hours against overwhelming odds, his unit was ordered to withdraw as their ammunition was almost depleted. With no regard for his own personal safety, he volunteered to stay at his position and continue to fire his machine-gun to cover the withdrawal of his unit and to protect his assistant machine-gunner, who had been seriously wounded. His position was under intense small arms, machine-gun, and artillery fire, and while covering the withdrawal of his unit he was also wounded. Undaunted, he continued to deliver effective fire on the enemy, inflicting heavy casualties. He was last seen when his position was overrun by the enemy.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 12 (July 28, 1950)
Home Town: Albany, New York

GONZALES, RAY B.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Ray B. Gonzales (RA38680214), Corporal, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company B, 1st Battalion, 187th Airborne Regimental Combat Team, 11th Airborne Division. Corporal Gonzales distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Naisonggum, Korea, on 25 January 1951. On that date, a patrol, of which Corporal Gonzales was a member, was approaching the village of Naisonggum when a large enemy force opened fire from concealed positions and attacked the patrol. During the attack, Corporal Gonzales and four comrades were cut off from the main body of the patrol. In the fierce fighting which followed, Corporal Gonzales received a head wound and his right elbow was shattered by enemy machine-gunfire. Disregarding his wounds, he immediately took command of the small group, deploying them and directing effective fire on the enemy. When the enemy launched a "banzai" attack in an effort to overrun his positions, corporal Gonzales, firing his carbine with his left hand, personally killed two of them. Repelling the assault, the group, inspired by the heroism and courageous leadership of Corporal Gonzales, continued to repulse subsequent attacks until dark, at which time he led them in a successful withdrawal from the enemy trap. Due to the rugged terrain and the large number of enemy operating in the area, he was forced to take a devious route to the company area over steep, snow-covered mountains in sub-zero temperature. Although painfully wounded himself, Corporal Gonzales helped carry another man, wounded in the leg, back to the company. By his insistent demands that the group keep moving, he led them all night through the intense cold and arrived at the company area at 0600 hours the following morning A medical examination revealed that, in addition to his wounds, his feet were also frozen.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 319 (May 17, 1951)
Born: June 13, 1926 at Corpus Christi, Texas
Home Town: Wayne, Michigan

*GOODE, JOHN
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to John Goode (RA14263854), Private First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company L, 3d Battalion, 9th Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division. Private First Class Goode distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces near Yongsan, Korea, on 17 September 1950. Private First Class Goode's unit was suffering heavy casualties from enemy small-arms, mortar and anti-tank weapon fire. Observers tried to spot the anti-tank weapon, but were not successful. Private Goode, on his own initiative, and with complete disregard for his own personal safety, boldly moved out of his position to try and spot the enemy anti-tank gun but was unable to do so. Again, under a hail of heavy enemy automatic-weapon, mortar and anti-tank fire, he climbed upon a knoll and was still unable to spot the gun. From atop the knoll he boldly yelled to members of his squad that he was going to fire his carbine and attempt to draw fire from the enemy anti-tank gun. His fellow soldiers pleaded with him not to do so, but he ignored their pleas and fired his weapon. His courageous and selfless act drew fire from the enemy weapon on his position, mortally wounding him, but enabled a 57-mm. recoilless rifle to take the anti-tank weapon under fire and destroy it. The extraordinary heroism displayed by Private First Class Goode and his devotion to the men of his unit who were suffering heavy casualties from the enemy anti-tank weapon, sacrificing his own life to save theirs, reflects great credit upon himself.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 60 (February 8, 1951)
Home Town: Mobile, Alabama

GORE, WILLIAM E.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to William E. Gore, First Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Headquarters Company, 3d Battalion, 187th Airborne Regimental Combat Team, 11th Airborne Division. First Lieutenant Gore distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces near Sukchon, Korea, on 22 October 1950. On that date, Lieutenant Gore was in command of troops defending the perimeter when the enemy attacked in strength of approximately one battalion. Due to poor visibility in the early morning light, the enemy was able to advance to within forty yards of the perimeter before being observed. Lieutenant Gore, being the first to recognize the enemy, ordered his men to open fire causing the enemy to immediately deploy to the left and right of his position. The enemy attempted a ruse at this time by calling out "ROK" giving the impression that they were friendly troops and causing most of the men to cease firing. Lieutenant Gore, recognizing the trick, ordered his men to continue firing. Exposing himself to intense and accurate small arms fire, he went from one position to another around the perimeter directing fire and designating targets. The enemy began to close in on the position, and Lieutenant Gore, realizing, the situation was becoming desperate, completely exposed himself to the enemy fire by dashing up a hill to the rear where a radio was located and called for artillery fire. Standing in an exposed position where two men had just been killed and two wounded, he personally directed the artillery fire, which caused the enemy to become disorganized and halt their encirclement of the defending positions. The fight continued for approximately six hours, but the enemy was unable to advance. During the battle Lieutenant Gore made at least ten inspections of the perimeter, distributing ammunition end boosting morale of his troops by his presence. His heroic actions and leadership were inspiring to his men, who rallied and held the perimeter inflicting heavy casualties on the enemy.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 187 (December 5, 1950)

*GRAF, ROBERT E.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Robert E. Graf (RA27714904), Private First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as an automatic rifleman with an Infantry Company of the 7th Infantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division. Private First Class Graf distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Changpyongdong, Korea, on 4 February 1951. On that date, his company was engaged in a limited withdrawal because of the unrelenting pressure of a numerically superior hostile force. As the friendly troops fell back, constantly harassed by enemy small-arms and automatic-weapons fire, Private Graf, with a total disregard for his personal safety, moved across the fire-swept terrain to an exposed position in order to provide covering fire with his automatic rifle. He was instantly hit by enemy machine-gun fire. Although seriously wounded, he crawled toward a nearby enemy-manned emplacement and destroyed it with an accurately hurled grenade. His actions drew the fire of a second enemy emplacement and, upon ascertaining its location, he rose painfully to his feet and fired a burst into the machine-gun position, killing three of the four enemy soldiers and successfully neutralizing the weapon. His courageous action was responsible for silencing the enemy weapons which posed the major threat to his comrades thus enabling the friendly force to withdraw with a minimum of casualties.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 1001 (December 18, 1951)
Home Town: Douglas, Missouri

GRAY, JOHN EDWARD
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to John Edward Gray (0-58411), First Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company M, 3d Battalion, 31st Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division. First Lieutenant Gray distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of the Changjin (Chosin) Reservoir in North Korea, on 1 December 1950. Lieutenant Gray had been wounded in the hand and both legs on 29 November 1950, while directing the fire of his mortar platoon in defense of a sector of the battalion command post perimeter against repeated attacks by a numerically superior hostile force. The battalion was complete surrounded and only limited aerial evacuation of the wounded could be effected. He elected to remain with his organization, and on 1 December, when orders were given to attempt a break-out of the encirclement, he was ordered to ride on a convoy of vehicles with other wounded. After proceeding about four miles, the battalion was halted by a murderous fire from a road block and well-entrenched positions on both flanks. Though hardly able to walk and suffering greatly from his wounds, he left his transportation to rally and reorganize a group of soldiers and fearless led them up high ground against the enemy emplacements. After capturing a sector of the enemy's perimeter and realizing he had insufficient troop strength to maintain the position, he again moved through the barrage of fire and returned to the bottom of the hill where he organized another group of men and again charged the enemy, routing them from their strong-points and enabled the convoy to resume its advance. Lieutenant Gray's superb leadership, gallant and aggressive actions, and sustained devotion to duty reflect utmost credit on himself and the honored traditions of the military service.
General Headquarters Far East Command: General Orders No. 166 (June 28, 1951)
Born: August 24, 1925 at Cleveland, North Carolina
Home Town: Rowan, North Carolina

GRAY, STEPHEN E.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Stephen E. Gray (0-28683), First Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company L, 3d Battalion, 23d Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division. First Lieutenant Gray distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Changnyong, Korea, on 16 September 1950. As one of the leading elements in the 3d Battalion, Lieutenant Gray led the 3d platoon of Company L in an attack on enemy defensive positions along the Naktong River. His platoon immediately came under extremely heavy and accurate enemy mortar, machine-gun, and small-arms fire. Under direct fire from an enemy machine gun, he led his platoon forward in a charge on the first objective. He destroyed one enemy machine-gun and assisted in eliminating a group of sixty enemy soldiers who had the advantage of entrenched positions. Reorganizing his platoon, he prepared to continue the attack toward the second objective which was better defended than the first. In spite of this fact, he shouted to his platoon to move forward and courageously led the attack. At times prior to the second assault, he directed supporting mortar fire to within twenty-five yards of his own position. Although the binoculars hanging around his neck were hit by shell fragments, he did not hesitate in the face of this intense enemy fire, and the ferocity and daring of his assault along with his platoon routed the enemy from their positions. Upon receiving a third objective, Lieutenant Gray organized a tank-infantry attack, and again personally led the assault on the objective. This third assault completely demoralized the enemy and drove them from their man line of resistance. Lieutenant Gray's daring and inspiring leadership on this occasion was a major factor in the success of Company L's attempt to reach the Naktong River. His actions accounted for an estimated one hundred enemy dead and wounded, the elimination of three mortars, two fortified machine-gun positions, and one enemy field piece.
General Headquarters Far East Command: General Orders No. 166 (1951)
Home Town: Lake, Illinois

*GREEN, JOHN HENRY
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to John Henry Green (0-0062500), First Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Commanding an Infantry Company of the 32d Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division. First Lieutenant Green distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Kumhwa, Korea, on 15 October 1952. On that date, Lieutenant Green led his men in an assault on a vital enemy position through a barrage of small-arms, artillery and mortar fire. In the course of the attack, the company was subjected to fire from a camouflaged position, threatening to halt the advance. Lieutenant Green, leaping from cover into a communication trench, without regard for his own safety, hurled grenades to neutralize the enemy machine-gun. When the company was again subjected to devastating fire from a tunnel under one of the trenches, Lieutenant Green moved forward to destroy the position and, in the process of silencing the guns, received wounds which later became fatal. Resuming the advance despite his painful wounds, Lieutenant Green led his men in an attack against the hostile forces. His courageous and inspirational leadership was greatly responsible for routing the enemy and securing the strategic ground.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 528 (May 31, 1953)
Born: April 30, 1926 at Orville, California
Home Town: Green River, Wyoming

*GRICE, CHARLES G.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Charles G. Grice (US56070049), Corporal, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company B, 1st Battalion, 7th Infantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division. Corporal Grice distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces at Kum Choktong, Korea, on 12 December 1951. On that date, Corporal Grice's platoon was committed to enter enemy lines and return with a prisoner. After effecting the capture, the cries of the prisoner alerted a hostile force which attempted envelopment of the unit. Realizing that the encirclement was imminent, Corporal Grice immediately placed withering fire on the enemy, slowing the advance and enabling his platoon to successfully withdraw. While the unit was disengaging, he selflessly remained in the rear, firing his weapon and walking backward as he withdrew, impeding the progress of the foe. As hostile troops pressed nearer with fanatical determination, he voluntarily continued to cover the withdrawal. He gallantly maintained his stand and poured crippling fire into the ranks of the advancing enemy until he was mortally wounded. Through his courage and inspirational actions, the assault was stemmed and his platoon accomplished its mission with minimum casualties.
Department of the Army: General Orders No. 89 (October 3, 1952)
Home Town: Los Angeles, California

*GRIEGO, SIMON (MIA)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Simon Griego (RA39869319), Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company C, 1st Battalion, 38th Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division. Sergeant Griego distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces near Taeusan, Korea, on 26 July 1951. Committed to attack and secure key terrain tenaciously defended by a ruthless hostile force occupying well-fortified bunkers, the 1st Platoon moved up the rugged approaches to the hill and, coming under devastating automatic weapons, mortar and small-arms fire, suffered numerous casualties. Sergeant Griego, leader of a machine-gun squad, realizing that encirclement was imminent, immediately displaced his gun to an open forward vantage from which he brought destructive fire to bear on enemy emplacements, slowing the assault and enabling evacuation of the wounded. Since the other members of his squad had been wounded in the initial phase of the action, Sergeant Griego carried ammunition, manned the weapon and, when his ammunition was expended, made repeated trips through withering fire to the rear approximately twenty yards away to replenish his supply. Although sustaining a painful wound in this bitterly contested encounter, Sergeant Griego maintained his magnificent stand until a grenade burst rendered his leg useless, and he was last seen being evacuated to a nearby position.
General Headquarters Far East Command: General Orders No. 99 (September 4, 1952)
Home Town: Maricopa, Arizona

GRIFFIN, ALBERT F.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Albert F. Griffin (RA11218479), Sergeant First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Infantry Company, 224th Infantry Regiment, 40th Infantry Division. Sergeant First Class Griffin distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Satae-Ri, Korea, on 29 December 1952. On that date, Sergeant Griffin was a member of a patrol which was dispatched to recover the body of an enemy soldier who had been killed in an earlier battle. The United Nations patrol was ambushed by an enemy patrol which subjected it to heavy small-arms fire, wounding Sergeant Griffin and three of the other men. Though in great pain, Sergeant Griffin assisted in the establishment of a perimeter defense and directed the fire of his patrol. During the fight, Sergeant Griffin fought valiantly. When an enemy hand grenade landed near him, Sergeant Griffin, realizing the danger to his comrades, unhesitatingly picked up the missile to hurl it back into the enemy ranks. It exploded, severing his right hand. In spite of the seriousness of his wounds, Sergeant Griffin held his position and continued to direct fire and shout words of encouragement until the patrol withdrew to friendly lines. The extraordinary heroism exhibited by Sergeant Griffin on this occasion reflects great credit on himself and is in keeping with the finest traditions of the military service.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 696 (July 26, 1953)
Home Town: Suffolk, Massachusetts

GUERRA, JUAN F.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Juan F. Guerra, Corporal, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company F, 2d Battalion, 23d Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division. Corporal Guerra distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces near Wongo-ri, Korea, on 24 May 1951. Corporal Guerra was a member of an infantry unit that had the mission of breaking up an enemy roadblock. When the advance of one of the platoons of his unit was halted by intense enemy fire, Corporal Guerra single-handedly charged the hostile positions, killing five of the enemy in their foxholes, enabling the platoon to continue its advance and secure the objective. Corporal Guerra then volunteered to lead his squad in an attack on a hostile force that had pinned down another friendly platoon. Leading his squad forward, he remained well in advance of his men, assaulted the enemy positions and, using grenades, destroyed three enemy mortars and one machine-gun.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 480 (June 30, 1951)

*GUSTIN, RALPH S.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Ralph S. Gustin (0-60851), First Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company C, 1st Battalion, 24th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division. First Lieutenant Gustin distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces near Haman, Korea, on 11 August 1950. On that date, Lieutenant Gustin's platoon was attacked by an enemy superior in both numbers and firepower. Heedless of the intense fire, he moved quickly and continuously among his men, encouraging them and directing their action. By employing his squad with great skill and setting for them a notable example of personal bravery, he enabled the unit to hold its position and inflict severe casualties on the foe until withdrawal was mandatory because of the overwhelming number of the enemy. Having determined the method and supervised the start of an orderly displacement, he remained firing into the onrushing enemy to cover the unit until he was mortally wounded.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 89 (October 1, 1950)
Home Town: St. Joseph, Indiana

H

*HAGAN, FRANK D.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Frank D. Hagan (RA19301631), Corporal, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company K, 3d Battalion, 7th Cavalry Regiment (Infantry), 1st Cavalry Division. Corporal Hagan distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Sonbyok, Korea, on the night of 28 September 1951. On that night Corporal Hagan's company was occupying positions on a strategic hill when it was attacked by a large hostile force. The majority of the enemy troops concentrated their assault against the left flank of the company perimeter where Corporal Hagan's position was located. The intense enemy fire caused the defenders in this sector to execute a limited withdrawal but Corporal Hagan, realizing that his own position was now the key to the friendly defense, remained in his emplacement with unflinching determination, firing rapidly into the charging foe. Observing that one position was all that barred their advance, the enemy force converged on Corporal Hagan, who fought with such ferocity and courageous singleness of purpose that eighteen of them were killed before his position was overrun. The heroic action of Corporal Hagan enabled his company to form a new defense line from which they counterattacked the hostile force and routed them from the hill with heavy casualties. When Corporal Hagan's emplacement was retaken by his comrades, he was found dead among the enemy he had killed, still clutching his bayonet in his hand.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 102 (February 21, 1952)
Home Town: Los Angeles, California

*HALL, GLENN M.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Glenn M. Hall (RA19325774), Corporal, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as a light machine-gunner with 1st Ranger Company (Airborne), 2d Infantry Division. Corporal Hall distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces near Chipyong-ni, Korea, on 15 February 1951. At approximately 0300 hours on the morning of 15 February 1951, the 1st platoon of the Company, of which Corporal Hall was a member, was given the mission of attacking and securing a hill from which friendly forces had been drive by the enemy. As the attack commenced, he emplaced his weapon in an exposed position from which he furnished covering fire for the attack until his machine-gun jammed. Then, taking his carbine, Corporal Hall moved up the hill under intense enemy fire to join his comrades and aid them in the assault. When the platoon reached the crest of the hill, he was instructed to contact the unit on the flank of the platoon. Moving out under heavy enemy mortar and small arms fire, he proceeded to the knoll supposedly held by the adjacent friendly unit and found it occupied by enemy troops entrenched in foxholes. Assaulting one of the foxholes, he succeeded in killing the enemy occupying it, then used the position as cover against enemy grenade and rifle fire. In the course of fighting at this position, Corporal Hall was wounded by an enemy grenade; however, he tenaciously held the position, inflicting heavy casualties on the enemy, forcing them to fall back and single-handedly secured the flank of his platoon.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 420 (June 10, 1951)
Home Town: Siskiyou, California

*HALL, RAYMOND E.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Raymond E. Hall, Corporal, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as a Medical Aidman attached to Company M, 3d Battalion, 7th Infantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division. Corporal Hall distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces near Sansong- ni, Korea, on 16 February 1951. On that date, Corporal Hall was attached to Company M, Seventh Infantry Regiment, as an aid man during an attack on enemy occupied Hill 287. During the attack a tremendous concentration of mortar fire fell in the area, and all personnel in the vicinity were instructed to take cover. Corporal Hall hesitated, saying that he might be needed to render medical aid, but nevertheless moved to cover only when assured he would be called if needed. A few minutes later a second barrage of mortar fire and intense enemy small-arms fire raked the positions. The cry "Medic!" passed down the line. Corporal Hall grabbed his aid kit, sprang from his foxhole, and started toward the wounded soldier. His comrades called to him to wait until the incessant fire subsided, but he replied, "They need me. I must go." With complete disregard for his personal safety, he plunged into the midst of the enemy mortar fire and proceeded toward the fallen soldier. He had advanced only one hundred yards when he was killed by a mortar round.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 246 (April 27, 1951)

*HALL, WILLIAM H.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to William H. Hall (0-2204031), Second Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company K, 3d Battalion, 24th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division. Second Lieutenant Hall distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces near Chindong-ni, Korea, on 8 August 1950. On this date, Lieutenant Hall's battalion was ordered to take a rock crag in the vicinity of Chindong-ni. One hundred yards from the position, intensive enemy fire from the high ground and misdirected fire from friendly planes caused the battalion to disperse. When his company was pinned down, he took six men and made an encirclement to the left under supporting fire and advanced on the enemy positions. Totally regarding personal safety, he led this small group in a savage, determined charge upon the enemy position and pushed the numerically superior force from the objective. At this point a counterattack prevented the main body of the battalion from advancing. The battalion was ordered to withdraw. Although fully aware of his personal danger, Lieutenant Hall voluntarily covered the withdrawal and then covered the retirement of the six men with him His highly effective fire enabled the battalion to withdraw with a minimum number of casualties. Second Lieutenant Hall was killed while making this heroic stand.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 54 (February 6, 1951)
Home Town: Robertson, Tennessee

HALTERMAN, ROSCOE C.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Roscoe C. Halterman, Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company C, 89th Medium Tank Battalion, 25th Infantry Division. Sergeant Halterman distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Koan'g-u, Korea, on 7 March 1951. On that date, while on a tank patrol behind enemy lines, Sergeant Halterman sighted an enemy strong point which was blocking the advance of friendly forces. Knowing that the terrain precluded the use of tank weapons, Sergeant Halterman, armed with a submachine gun, dismounted and ran across approximately 200 yards of open ground to attack the objective from the rear. Raking the emplacements with submachine-gun fire, he inflicted several casualties and so completely demoralized the 30 remaining enemy troops with this daring attack that they threw down their weapons and surrendered. The fearless and aggressive action of Sergeant Halterman in single-handedly attacking and capturing the enemy against tremendous odds enabled the friendly forces to continue their advance and was in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 464 (June 27, 1951)

HANES, WALLACE W.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Wallace W. Hanes, Lieutenant Colonel (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as Commanding Officer of the 3d Battalion, 38th Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division. Lieutenant Colonel Hanes distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Kusong-po-ri, Korea, on 17 and 19 May 1951. On 17 May 1951, the 3d Battalion was defensively deployed in a strategically important sector of the 2d Division lines when the enemy launched a massive offensive against the battalion positions. Utterly indifferent to the intense mortar barrages preceding the attack and the intense small-arms and automatic-weapons fire which accompanied it, Colonel Hanes remained with the most forward elements of his battalion, encouraging his men and directing their fire. Inspired by the aggressive leadership and heroic actions of Colonel Hanes, the battalion steadfastly held its positions, even when infiltrating enemy forces reached the area occupied by the friendly troops. With his troops secure in deeply dug and well covered foxholes, Colonel Hanes brought heavy artillery fire on his own position, slaughtering the hostile forces and foiling each desperate attempt by the enemy to effect a breakthrough. When enemy elements succeeded in outflanking some of the battalion positions, he met them with fierce counterattacks, skillfully directing effective fire of his mortars and personally leading his reserves in repelling the enemy at bayonet point. When the enemy retreated on the evening of 19 May 1951, 2500 enemy dead were counted in front of the 3d Battalion positions and it was estimated that the hostile forces had suffered between 8,000 and 10,000 casualties in their futile attempts to break the resistance of Colonel Hanes and his gallant battalion. The extraordinary heroism and superb leadership of Colonel Hanes reflect great credit on himself and are in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 473 (June 29, 1951)

*HANKS, ARTHUR P.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Arthur P. Hanks (RA18351123), Master Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company B, 1st Battalion, 15th Infantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division. Master Sergeant Hanks distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces at Koyangdae, Korea, on 4 February 1952. While his platoon was counterattacking outpost "Kelly," under heavy enemy small-arms fire, it was ordered to withdraw until friendly supporting fire could be adjusted. When the platoon withdrew, two wounded men were left in a dangerous position. Seeing these wounded men, Sergeant Hanks gallantly exposed himself to enemy small-arms fire and numerous grenades. Fearlessly, he charged forward firing his carbine until he was mortally wounded by fragments from an enemy grenade. This action facilitated the evacuation of the two wounded men.
Department of the Army: General Orders No. 89 (October 3, 1952)
Home Town: Rapides, Louisiana

HANNA, MARK J.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Mark J. Hanna (0-62760), First Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving Commanding an Infantry Company of the 17th Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division. First Lieutenant Hanna distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces near Kumhwa, Korea, on 19 October, 1952. On that date, Lieutenant Hanna's company was occupying positions on a strategic hill under intense assault from hostile forces. When Lieutenant Hanna was ordered to reinforce elements of two other companies defending an area in great danger of enemy penetration, he immediately moved his men through a heavy barrage of small-arms, artillery and mortar fire to the threatened sector. Finding a confused and disorganized group of men whose officers had all been killed or wounded, Lieutenant Hanna assumed command and quickly deployed the small force in the most advantageous positions. Though hampered by darkness, and unfamiliar with the new men under his control, Lieutenant Hanna repeatedly exposed himself to deadly fire in order to set up the most effective defense of the vital hill. Observing a machine gunner who had been wounded, Lieutenant Hanna took control of the weapon and delivered accurate fire into the enemy ranks until he was seriously wounded himself. Lieutenant Hanna refused evacuation until he was certain that his men were fully organized and under competent leadership. The extraordinary heroism exhibited by Lieutenant Hanna on this occasion reflects great credit on himself and is in keeping with the finest traditions of the military service.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 715 (August 2, 1953
Home Town: Leavenworth, Kansas

*HANNAN, GEORGE ERVINE
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to George Ervine Hannan (0-62532), Second Lieutenant (Signal Corps), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Detachment E, 205th Signal Repair Company, attached to the 6th Republic of Korea Division, II Corps. Second Lieutenant Hannan distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces near Wonju, Korea, on 2 October 1950. Lieutenant Hannan was second in command of Detachment E, which consisted of two officers and seventeen enlisted men. While bivouacked in a compound on the outskirts of Wonju near the division command post, the detachment was attacked at 0100 by a banzai charge of approximately 2,400 enemy troops who had apparently been by-passed in the surrounding hills. The position of the detachment within the compound was discovered by the enemy. After subjecting the small force to heavy small-arms, mortar and automatic weapons fire, the enemy charged the compound in a frontal assault. The detachment commander ordered his troops to get out over the rear wall of the compound while he covered the withdrawal. With total disregard for his own safety, Lieutenant Hannan voluntarily took up an exposed position near the front entrance and detracted the enemy with his harassing fire to enable the unit to withdraw. Lieutenant Hannan maintained his position although wounded several times, until all the enlisted men had cleared the area. When the enemy stormed into the compound, by sheer weight of numbers, Lieutenant Hannan was overwhelmed.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 35 (January 21, 1951)
Home Town: Hughes, South Dakota

*HANSEL, MORGAN B.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Morgan B. Hansel (0-1825120), First Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company C, 1st Battalion, 5th Cavalry Regiment (Infantry), 1st Cavalry Division. First Lieutenant Hansel distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces near Kunu-ri, Korea, on 3 and 4 November 1950. When his unit was heavily engaged in trying to seize and hold vital high ground, Lieutenant Hansel noticed that the platoon on his right flank was receiving very heavy enemy machine-gun and automatic-weapons fire and was rapidly becoming disorganized. He left his position of relative safety and made his way out to them under a hail of fire to effect their reorganization. Locating the enemy machine-gun and automatic weapons that were firing upon the platoon with such telling effect, Lieutenant Hansel arose to his feet and, with complete disregard for his own personal safety, charged the enemy emplacements single-handed, armed only with his carbine. He succeeded in reaching the hostile positions and killed the machine-gunner, giving almost instant respite to our forces, but in the ensuing, action he was mortally wounded by one of the remaining enemy automatic riflemen. Because of First Lieutenant Hansel's heroic attack despite the great odds and his gallant sacrifice, the endangered troops were able to complete their reorganization and rout the enemy from their positions.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 397 (June 4, 1951)
Home Town: Delaware, Ohio

*HANSEN, DARRELL J.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Darrell J. Hansen (0-1934922), Second Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with an Infantry Company of the 65th Infantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division. Second Lieutenant Hansen distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Kumhwa, Korea, on 16 July 1953. On that date, Lieutenant Hansen was the leader of a combat patrol which advanced on an enemy-held hill to contact and engage the enemy. Despite the intense bombardment throughout the area, Lieutenant Hansen led his group to the crest of the hill, disperse his men, and supervised the establishment of defensive positions. When the enemy assaulted the patrol from the rear, Lieutenant Hansen completely ignored the heavy barrage and moved openly throughout the sector to direct the effective fire of his men and to assist in the care of the wounded. As the attack increased in volume, Lieutenant Hansen ordered his group to withdraw and courageously remained behind to cover their movement with his carbine. With fearless disregard for his personal welfare, he inflicted numerous casualties on the enemy and personally repulsed the assault before he was mortally wounded by enemy fire. Through his self-sacrifice and devotion to duty, Lieutenant Hansen enabled his patrol to withdraw to the safety of rear positions with a minimum of casualties.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 1091, (December 20, 1953)
Home Town: Muscatine County, Iowa

HARDY, JOHN R.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to John R. Hardy (0-2007768), First Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company E, 2d Battalion, 35th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division. First Lieutenant Hardy distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces Kuhe-ri, Korea, on 25 August 1950. Lieutenant Hardy's unit was providing fire cover for a patrol crossing the Nan River. As the first assault boat reached the enemy-held shore and the troops deployed, they were subjected to intense small-arms fire from three sides. Observing that the patrol's position was untenable, the company commander ordered an immediate withdrawal, but hardly had the order been given when the patrol leader was killed. The remaining eight men re-entered the boat and started to return, barely getting underway when six were wounded by the intense enemy fire and boat, adrift, started moving toward the enemy shore. Seeing the helpless plight of his comrades, and disregarding the hail of enemy fire, Lieutenant Hardy plunged into the swift current, swam sixty yards to the boat, retrieved it, and succeeded in towing it safely to the friendly shore.
Department of the Army: General Orders No. 4 (February 7, 1951)
Home Town: Niagara, New York

HARDY, WILLARD J.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Willard J. Hardy (0-887996), Captain (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as Commanding Officer of Company C, 1st Battalion, 160th Infantry Regiment, 40th Infantry Division. Captain Hardy distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Sat'ae-ri Korea, on the night of 3 November 1952. On that night, a hostile force of estimated battalion strength attacked the defensive positions occupied by Captain Hardy's company. With complete disregard for his personal safety, Captain Hardy moved from platoon to platoon through intense fire to direct the efforts of his men. When enemy troops penetrated the friendly defense and gained possession of high ground dominating the area, he began a one-man charge up the slope, firing his carbine and throwing grenades, supported only by small-arms fire from his radio operator. With aggressive determination, Captain Hardy continued to advance against concentrated fire until he was hurled down the hill by an exploding grenade. Wounded and dazed, and having lost his helmet and carbine, he moved to the remnants of two friendly platoons, obtained another weapon and helmet, organized an assault force, and led it forward in a counterattack. Inspired by his courageous example, the small party of friendly infantrymen succeeded early the following morning in driving the foe from the hill and reestablished the defense line. The extraordinary heroism exhibited by Captain Hardy throughout this action reflects great credit on himself and is in keeping with the finest traditions of the military service.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 203, (February 8, 1953)

*HARRINGTON, ELDRIDGE
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Eldridge Harrington (RA17010292), Sergeant First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company G, 2d Battalion, 19th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division. Sergeant First Class Harrington distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces near the city of Anju, Korea, on 5 November 1950. On that date, Sergeant First Class Harrington was the first member of Company G to discover the approach of the Chinese Communist Forces which attacked his company's position at approximately 0530 hours. He shouted the alarm to other members of his platoon and immediately directed his squad to engage the enemy by fire. As the squad opened fire the enemy, realizing that his attack had been discovered, attempted to overrun the squad's position by sheer weight of numbers. With utter fearlessness, Sergeant Harrington ran up and down the ridge in his squad area shouting orders to his men. Having satisfied himself that his squad was fighting at maximum effectiveness, he himself jumped into a foxhole and took up the fire-fight. When last seen alive he was calmly and deliberately picking off the attacking enemy soldiers and shouting encouragement to his men. Sergeant Harrington's body was found still clutching his rifle in the firing position. Directly in front of his position were seventeen enemy dead. Sergeant Harrington's fearless self sacrifice on this occasion and the determined resistance which he inspired in his squad made possible the successful withdrawal of company G to secondary defensive positions from which the company successfully stopped the enemy attack.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 19, (January 12, 1951)
Home Town: Faulkner, Arkansas

*HARRIS, JAMES A., JR.
(First Award)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to James A. Harris, Jr. (0-2204091), Second Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company E, 2d Battalion, 27th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division. Second Lieutenant Harris distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces near Chang Nyong-ni, Korea, on 28 July 1950. When the enemy set up an observation post on a dominant hill and repulsed all attempts to be dislodged, Lieutenant Harris organized a patrol of seven men to take the hill. Climbing the precipitous slope, he led the patrol in a daring frontal assault against an estimated forty enemy soldiers armed with automatic weapons and supported by mortars and artillery. Storming the position, his patrol routed the enemy in a bitter hour-long fight. When the hill was secured, twenty-one enemy dead were counted and nine machine-guns and numerous maps were captured.
Department of the Army: General Orders No. 4 (1951)
Home Town: Marshall, Alabama
Other Award: Distinguished Service Cross w/OLC (Korea)

*HARRIS, JAMES A., JR.
(Second Award)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting a Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster in lieu of a Second Award of the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to James A. Harris, Jr. (0-2204091), First Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company E, 2d Battalion, 27th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division. First Lieutenant Harris distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces near Changnyong-ni, Korea, on 20 September 1950. On that date, First Lieutenant Harris was with his company in an attack under devastating enemy fire. When the company commander was wounded during this engagement and unable to continue the attack, Lieutenant Harris immediately took charge of the company and led the attack. After securing the first objective, he was seriously wounded in the chest by hostile fire but refused medical aid. Even though mortally wounded he continued in the attack and secured the last enemy strongpoint. Through the outstanding bravery and gallant sacrifice of Lieutenant Harris, the company successfully accomplished their mission and inflicted heavy casualties upon the enemy. Lieutenant Harris died of his wounds on 21 September 1950. The extraordinary heroism displayed by First Lieutenant Harris reflected great credit on himself and was in keeping with the high traditions of the military service.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 169 (March 26, 1951)
Home Town: Marshall, Alabama
Other Award: Distinguished Service Cross (Korea)

HARRIS, WILLIAM A.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to William A. Harris, Lieutenant Colonel (Field Artillery), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as Commanding Officer of the 7th Cavalry Regiment (Task Force 777), 1st Cavalry Division. Lieutenant Colonel Harris distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Hambung-ni, Korea, n the night of 26 - 27 September 1950. Task Force 777, a regimental combat team, was proceeding on a combat mission when it was ambushed by a hostile force of ten tanks, supported by infantry. The tanks moved directly into the friendly column, firing rapidly, smashing vehicles and equipment and disorganizing the friendly troops. Colonel Harris, realizing the perilous situation of his unit, immediately went toward the head of the column, completely disregarding the intense enemy fire. He quickly evaluated the situation, then personally reorganized his men and led them in a counterattack. Inspired by the dauntless actions of their commander, the men overwhelmed the enemy force, knocked out the ten tanks, destroyed five artillery pieces, and captured twelve enemy trucks. The extraordinary heroism and fearless leadership of Colonel Harris were directly responsible for the annihilation of the enemy force.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 512, (July 5, 1951)

HARTNETT, RICHARD J.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Richard J. Hartnett, Sergeant First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as a Squad Leader in an Infantry Company of the 3d Infantry Division. Sergeant First Class Hartnett distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Chorwon, Korea, on 29 September 1951. On that date, Sergeant Hartnett's company was assigned the mission of attacking a numerically superior hostile force occupying well-fortified hill positions. Commanding the lead squad of this assault, Sergeant Hartnett had maneuvered his men to within a few yards of the enemy emplacements when a heavy volume of machine-gun fire halted their advance. Unhesitatingly, Sergeant Hartnett charged directly into the intense enemy fire, hurling grenades and firing his rifle. His aggressive action neutralized the hostile emplacement, but his attack also attracted the attention of the enemy troops occupying another bunker who immediately directed their fire against the friendly force. Sergeant Hartnett single-handedly assaulted the emplacement, this time destroying its weapon and killing the occupants. Observing another enemy position, he fearlessly charged a third time and eliminated it. His courageous actions were directly responsible for the collapse of the enemy defenses and enabled his company to take its objective with a minimum of casualties.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 3 (January 2, 1952)

*HARVEY, GEORGE W.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to George W. Harvey (0-2262406), Second Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as a Platoon Leader of Company E, 2d Battalion, 38th Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division. Second Lieutenant Harvey distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces at Wonju, Korea, on 15 February 1951. Leading his platoon in an assault to secure Hill 325, the unit met intense enemy fire from three machine-guns. Lieutenant Harvey silenced all three machine-guns with his grenades and rifle and led his platoon to is objective. While organizing the defense of the secured terrain, he was mortally wounded by hostile mortar fire.
Department of the Army: General Orders No. 64 (June 30, 1952)
Home Town: Marion, Indiana

*HATFIELD, RAYMOND L.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Raymond L. Hatfield (RA15422227), Corporal, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company K, 3d Battalion, 31st Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division. Corporal Hatfield distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Chorwon, Korea, on 6 March 1953. On that date, Corporal Hatfield, a radio operator, was in the command post on a strategic outpost when it was subjected to assault by hostile forces. The intense artillery and mortar barrage which accompanied the attack rendered all land lines inoperative in the initial stages of the action, and repeated shelling of the artillery observation post damaged all radios. Corporal Hatfield, realizing that the situation was critical, left the cover of the bunker, disregarding all thoughts of personal safety. He moved across the fire-swept trenches to a position in the open where he could adjust illumination and artillery fire against enemy troops advancing through their own barrage. He held his position in spite of intense and accurate enemy fire until he was fatally wounded. His courageous actions were largely responsible for inspiring his comrades to a tenacious defense of the outpost.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 603, (June 26, 1953)
Home Town: Harlan, Kentucky

*HAUGLAND, HAROLD PETER (MIA)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Harold Peter Haugland (RA19350144), Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company D, 15th Anti-Aircraft Artillery (Automatic Weapons) Battalion, 7th Infantry Division. Sergeant Haugland distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of the Changjin (Chosin) Reservoir in North Korea on 29 and 30 November 1950. On these dates the battery to which Sergeant Haugland was assigned was providing ground defense for field artillery elements, and his M-19 (twin 40-mm. guns) was covering one sector of the perimeter defense. The enemy made numerous heavy attacks against his weapon on 29 November 1950, and by exposing himself voluntarily to intense fire, he was able to direct the fire of his guns to the most vulnerable points with speed and efficiency. As a result of his selfless exposure to enemy fire, he was seriously wounded in one foot and was carried to the aid station. Early on the morning of 30 November 1950, the enemy renewed the attack against the perimeter. Sergeant Haugland, with complete disregard for his own welfare and safety, wrapped his wounded foot in cloth and using an empty ration box for a shoe, made his way under enemy fire from the aid station to his M-19, where he resumed command and continued to expose himself to enemy fire while commanding the weapon During this action an enemy mortar set fire to the ammunition trailer. In order to direct the driver of the M-19 to an alternate position, Sergeant Haugland, with great valor, in the midst of exploding 40-mm. high explosive shells, coolly walked in front of the vehicle and guided the driver of the gun carriage. As a direct result of his outstanding devotion to duty, his fearless leadership, and his exemplary heroism, his M-19 prevented penetration of the perimeter and killed scores of the enemy. His display of extraordinary heroism on this occasion reflects great credit on himself and the military service.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 1002 (December 20, 1951)
Home Town: Gallatin, Montana

*HELSEL, CHESTER R.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Chester R. Helsel (RA13308394), Private First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as a Demolition Technician with an Infantry Company of the 32d Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division. Private First Class Helsel distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Chohanggol, Korea, on the morning of 29 January 1952. On that date, Private Helsel moved into enemy-held territory with a patrol assigned the mission of locating and destroying hostile emplacements. As the members of the patrol climbed the icy slope of the ridge which was their objective, the fog which had concealed their movements suddenly lifted, revealing their presence to the enemy. A murderous volume of small-arms and automatic weapons fire was immediately directed on the friendly troops from the commanding heights, pining them down and causing several casualties. Although he could have remained in his relatively protected position, Private Helsel borrowed a weapon and ammunition from one of the wounded and, with an aggressiveness that served as an inspiration to his comrades, charged alone toward the enemy entrenchments. Throwing grenades and firing his weapon with deadly accuracy, he inflicted severe casualties upon the foe. With the fire of the entire hostile force concentrated on him, he continued his one-man charge up the hill until he had reached the enemy emplacements. As he was about to leap inside to engage the foe in hand-to-hand combat, he was hit and killed by a burst of hostile fire.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 559 (September 19, 1952)
Home Town: Blair, Pennsylvania

HEMPHILL, JOHN ALLEN
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to John Allen Hemphill (0-64015), First Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as Company Commander of Company I, 3d Battalion, 31st Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division. First Lieutenant Hemphill distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Chorwon, Korea, on 17 April 1953. On that date, Lieutenant Hemphill led a spirited counterattack in an effort to retake a vital hill position which had been overrun by hostile troops. Though wounded in both legs, Lieutenant Hemphill held the lead of the company until it was pinned down by accurate and deadly fire from an enemy machine gun. Realizing the consequences of a stalemate at that point in the action, Lieutenant Hemphill picked up a 3.5 rocket launcher and, disregarding all thoughts of personal safety, charged the machine gun bunker. When he was approximately twenty yards from the position, Lieutenant Hemphill fired his only round ammunition through the aperture, scoring a direct hit and annihilating the occupants. Upon reaching the crest of the hill, Lieutenant Hemphill was again wounded but, refusing evacuation, he moved from bunker to bunker directing the repulse of the remaining hostile troops. It was only after the hill was secured and the reorganization almost complete that Lieutenant Hemphill consented to the evacuation. The extraordinary heroism exhibited by Lieutenant Hemphill on this occasion reflects great credit on himself and is in keeping with the finest traditions of the military service.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 604 (June 26, 1953)
Home Town: Ada, Idaho

HENSLEY, JAMES
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to James Hensley, Corporal, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as a Squad Leader with a platoon of Company F, 2d Battalion, 17th Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division. Corporal Hensley distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces near Hungnam, North Korea, on 19 December 1950. Elements of his company were deployed in a series of strongpoints approximately nine hundred yards apart defending the perimeter around the Port of Hungnam. Corporal Hensley observed a large hostile force approaching his position through a pass at approximately 0300 hours. Awakening and alerting the members of his squad, and instilling confidence that they could contain the attack, Corporal Hensley waited until the enemy had advanced within thirty yards and, manning a machine-gun, delivered point-blank fire into their ranks, inflicting many casualties. Although subjected to intense small-arms, automatic-weapons, and recoilless rifle fire and knowing the strongpoints on both sides had been overrun, Corporal Hensley refused to abandon his vantage point. On several occasions, hostile troops succeeded in crawling nearby and hurled grenades at his position, one of which grazed his hand, but undaunted, he remained steadfast and exacted a heavy toll of casualties throughout each assault. After nearly an hour of bitter resistance, during which he turned his weapon around twice to deliver destructive fire on enemy groups who had infiltrated on both flanks, Corporal Hensley's machine-gun became defective and failed to fire automatically. Applying instant action, he continued to fire single rounds manually until the weapon become inoperative. With his machine-gun out of action and a dwindling supply of carbine ammunition, he ordered a withdrawal and, struggling with his heavy weapon to deny its possible use to the attacking enemy, he fearlessly led his squad up the ridge line toward the last known position of the strongpoint on his left flank, stopping twice to fight his way through pockets of infiltrating enemy. Corporal Hensley's valorous conduct and intrepid actions resulted in numerous hostile wounded and, after the position was retaken later in the morning, approximately forty enemy dead were found in the wake of his field of fire.
General Headquarters Far East Command: General Orders No. 196 (July 29, 1951)

*HERNAEZ, PAULINO E.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Paulino E. Hernaez (US50000470), Private, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company A, 1st Battalion, 5th Cavalry Regiment (Infantry), 1st Cavalry Division. Private Hernaez distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Yonchon, Korea, on 30 May 1951. On that date, Private Hernaez was acting as leading scout of a platoon whose mission was to break through hostile defenses in an effort to aid two friendly squads that had been encircled by the enemy. As the platoon advanced up a slope, it was subjected to intense fire from four hostile machine-guns and was pinned down. Realizing that his comrades faced annihilation, Private Hernaez quickly made his way to the left flank of the enemy positions and, without hesitation, single-handedly charged the hostile emplacements. Although hit almost immediately by the heavy volume of enemy fire concentrated on him, he continued his charge toward the enemy positions until mortally wounded. His sudden attack distracted the enemy, thereby enabling his comrades to renew their assault. Inspired by the courageous act of Private Hernaez, the friendly troops routed the enemy and successfully completed their mission
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 746 (October 6, 1951)
Home Town: Oahu, Hawaii

HERNANDEZ-GUZMAN, BADEL
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Badel Hernandez-Guzman, Private, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company I, 3d Battalion, 65th Infantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division. Private Hernandez-Guzman distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Chorwon, Korea, on 1 October 1951. On that date, Private Hernandez-Guzman's company was assigned the mission of attacking a numerically superior hostile force occupying well fortified hill positions. In the opening phase of the attack, the assaulting elements were pinned down by a devastating volume of hostile automatic weapons fire. Realizing that his comrades faced annihilation in their present untenable positions, Private Hernandez-Guzman picked up a flame thrower and began to move forward. Upon locating the hostile emplacement which posed the greatest threat to his comrades, he unhesitatingly ran toward it. Crossing a wide expanse of open terrain, and completely exposed to the concentrated fire of the enemy, he made his way to within twenty yards of the machine gun position. The enemy, in desperation, converged the entire volume of their firepower on Private Hernandez-Guzman, hurling numerous grenades in an attempt to halt the single-handed assault. Undeterred by the intense hostile fire, Private Hernandez-Guzman charged the remaining twenty yards and destroyed the enemy strongpoint with the flame thrower. Through his courageous and selfless actions, the friendly force was able to renew its assault and overrun its objective. The extraordinary heroism and steadfast devotion to duty displayed by Private Hernandez-Guzman reflect the greatest credit on himself and are in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 3 (January 2, 1952)

*HIDAY, JACK R.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Jack R. Hiday (RA19342704), Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company D, 15th Anti-Aircraft Artillery (Automatic Weapons) Battalion, 7th Infantry Division. Sergeant Hiday distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of the Changjin (Chosin) Reservoir in North Korea, on 30 November 1950. When the enemy launched a vicious attack, supported by mortar, automatic-weapons, and small-arms fire, against the M-16 half-track vehicle which he commanded, Sergeant Hiday stood on top of the vehicle and directed a barrage of fire into the charging hostile force. At the peak of the assault, it became necessary to replenish the weapon with full chests of ammunition. Observing that the cannoneers were unprotected during the change, the alert enemy rushed the vehicle. Sergeant Hiday, to protect his gun crew, grabbed a bazooka and leaped from the vehicle to draw hostile fire. As a result of his daring action, he was mortally wounded by a hail of fire, but his crew, meanwhile, reloaded and threw a heavy blanket of fire into the rushing enemy, killing a large number, dispersing the remaining element, and maintaining the defense of the perimeter.
Department of the Army: General Orders No. 50 (July 16, 1951)
Home Town: San Mateo, California

HIGH, CLIFF R.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Cliff R. High, Private, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company G, 2d Battalion, 23d Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division. Private High distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Suim Myon, Korea, on the afternoon of 10 October 1951. On that date, two platoons from the company of which Private High was a member launched an attack on a tactically important terrain feature held by a determined enemy force. When his platoon leader became a casualty, Private High, displaying aggressive leadership, assumed command of the platoon and led it forward to continue the attack. As the friendly troops crossed a ridgeline and advanced down the opposite slope, an enemy machine-gun opened fire on them, pinning them down and inflicting several casualties. Seeing that the other platoon leader had been wounded, Private High took command of the entire friendly force and led it forward in the face of heavy hostile fire. Within twenty feet of the objective, the friendly troops were subjected to a shower of grenades which halted their advance and then forced them back. Although stunned by the blast from one of the grenades, Private High paused only momentarily before again assuming command of the battered friendly force. Exhibiting keen tactical perception, he deployed automatic weapons to cover the flanks of his unit and then led the remainder of his small force in a smashing charge which overran the hill and destroyed the enemy positions. Private High's courageous leadership resulted in the successful completion of his company's mission, the death of at least fourteen of the enemy, and the capture of twenty-four prisoners.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 693 (November 11, 1952)

HILL, JOHN GILLESPIE
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to John Gillespie Hill, Major (Armor), [then Lieutenant], U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with 7th Cavalry Regiment (Task Force 777), 1st Cavalry Division. Major Hill distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Hambung-ni, Korea, on the night of 26 - 27 September 1950. On that night the battalion of which Major Hill was a member was moving rapidly forward in pursuit of hostile troops. Suddenly the column was subjected to a large volume of artillery and automatic weapons fire which pinned it down and inflicted several casualties. Simultaneously, two enemy tanks appeared and, directing murderous cannon and machine-gun fire against the friendly unit, succeeded in dividing it into two parts. Major Hill, with keen tactical perception, hurried up the road until he reached the battalion's advance party, which he immediately organized into rocket-launcher teams and guided them back to the scene of the battle. With complete disregard for his personal safety, he supervised the emplacement and firing of the rocket launchers while simultaneously throwing grenades and firing his own weapon with deadly accuracy at the foe. Just as one of the hostile tanks was destroyed by the rocket launcher fire, six additional tanks reinforced with hostile troops, greatly increasing the threat to the friendly unit. Major Hill immediately launched an attack on the newly arrived tanks, and directed the fire of his men with great effectiveness until two more tanks were destroyed and the remainder retreated. Inspired by Major Hills' courageous example, the friendly troops beat off the attack and continued their advance
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 578 (September 25, 1952)
Born: August 9, 1926 at Plattsburgh, New York

*HITCHNER, OMAR T.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Omar T. Hitchner (0-291851), Major (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as Commanding Officer of the 2d Battalion, 7th Cavalry Regiment (Infantry), 1st Cavalry Division. Major Hitchner distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces near Singi, Korea, on 6 September 1950. While inspecting the battalion's forward position, Major Hitchner noticed that the enemy, having complete domination of terrain and observation, were rendering one section of his defense line untenable through a heavy barrage of well-directed fire. Realizing that in order to continue operations it would be necessary for the unit on his sector to shift position and regain fire superiority, with complete disregard for his own personal safety, he personally and unhesitatingly exposed himself to extremely heavy enemy fire in order to draw the attention of the enemy away from his pinned-down unit. To assure that their deployment could be fully accomplished, he remained in his exposed and vulnerable position until he was mortally wounded. Due to this outstanding courage and conspicuous devotion to duty at the supreme sacrifice of his own life, his battalion was able to continue forward to a successful completion of the mission.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 18 (January 12, 1951)
Home Town: Marion, Oregon

HOLCOMB, REBEL L.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Rebel L. Holcomb, Sergeant First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company A, 1st Battalion, 23d Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division. Sergeant First Class Holcomb distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Chorwon, Korea, on the morning of 31 July 1952. On that date, the company of which Sergeant Holcomb was a member was preparing to launch an attack on an enemy-held hill when intense artillery, mortar, and small-arms fire pinned it down in an untenable position. Realizing that the company would suffer many casualties if it remained exposed to the merciless hostile fire, Sergeant Holcomb moved forward in a one-man charge up the slope of the hill. Advancing through a deadly fusillade, he inflicted heavy casualties on the foe with rifle fire and accurately-thrown grenades. When he had moved to within ten yards of the enemy's mail line of resistance, he saw that the hostile troops were so deeply entrenched that grenades and small-arms fire would not be able to dislodge them. Moving back down the hill, he rejoined his comrades and obtained a flame thrower, Then advancing once more into the face of enemy fire, he again climbed to the crest of the hill. Moving methodically from bunker to bunker, he directed a searing flame on the enemy troops within, effectively ending their resistance. As a result of his courageous action, the friendly company was able to sweep forward and secure the hill.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 689 (November 10,1952)

HOLLIS, LEVY V.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Levy V. Hollis, Master Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with 3d Battalion, 24th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division. Master Sergeant Hollis distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces near Haman, Korea, during the period from 21 to 24 August 1950. Master Sergeant Hollis' battalion was engaged in a fierce fire-fight with the enemy for the strategically important high ground near Haman, known as "Battle Mountain," or "Bald Hill." Despite the fact that his job as Battalion Operations Sergeant would ordinarily confine him to the battalion command post, he constantly moved under heavy enemy machine-gun, mortar, and small-arms fire from one end of the sector to the other, coordinating the fire and attack of assault elements and providing invaluable assistance to the battalion commander. Throughout this period he was active in organizing stragglers from the assault units of the battalion. He accompanied the battalion commander to front line positions on numerous occasions and on 22 August 1950 moved through intense enemy fire to carry ammunition to a strategically-placed machine-gun position. On 24 August 1950, battalion front line troops withdrew after being heavily attacked by a numerically superior enemy force. Sergeant Hollis, after rounding up stragglers, reorganized them as they came off the hill. Issuing weapons to those who had lost them in the attack or whose weapon was not functioning properly, he personally led them in a counterattack. His courage and initiative inspired the men to perform prodigious feats of arms and pushed the enemy off the position. At all times during this period Master Sergeant Hollis voluntarily led and directed carrying parties with vital supplies of water and ammunition to assault elements in the thick of the fight.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 41 (January 25, 1951)

*HOLLOWAY, JIMMIE (POW)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Jimmie Holloway (RA34201485), Master Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Battery A, 15th Field Artillery Battalion, 2d Infantry Division. Master Sergeant Holloway distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces at Changbong-ni, Korea, on 12 February 1951. On that date, the beleaguered battalion, heavily engaged against a numerically superior foe, was attempting to effect a withdrawal and Sergeant Holloway, constantly vulnerable to hostile fire, directed the defense and retrograde action of his battery. Learning that a wounded soldier had not been evacuated from the area just vacated, he dashed approximately 150 yards across open, fire-swept terrain to rescue him. Later, as the battalion proceeded to move back, it was halted by a roadblock and came under vicious fire. In the ensuing action, a mortar burst ignited one of the ammunition trucks. Sergeant Holloway, braving a withering barrage of fire, directed removal of the ammunition from the burning vehicle and then pushed it off the road. As enemy fire increased in volume and intensity, forcing the battalion into hasty defensive positions, he again raced through devastating fire and, uncoupling a howitzer form a truck, placed protective fire on a hill to enable a company of infantry to effect a withdrawal. After the executive officer was wounded and unable to respond to a call for artillery fire, Sergeant Holloway rushed forward to an exposed vantage point and, with mortar fire bursting within fifteen yards, fearlessly directed deadly accurate fire into the opposing force. Upon orders to secure commanding terrain and establish defensive positions, for the night, he volunteered to act as point for the combat patrol and was last seen moving up high ground toward the enemy. Master Sergeant Holloway's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Department of the Army: General Orders No. 107 (December 14, 1951)
Home Town: Orange, Florida

*HOOVER, MARION D.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Marion D. Hoover (US52083023), Private First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving a Heavy Weapons Company of the 17th Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division. Private First Class Hoover distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Chup'a-ri, Korea, on 3 September 1951. In the pre-dawn darkness, Private First Class Hoover, acting as a security guard in a forward area, observed a large hostile force moving into position to attack the friendly perimeter. Immediately, he alerted members of his platoon and then returned to his position to delay the enemy troops. As the attackers came swarming up the slope, Private Hoover opened fire. His deadly accuracy slowed the enemy attack and enabled his comrade to organize and consolidate their positions, thereby eliminating the advantage of surprise sought by the hostile forces. As the attack intensified, Private Hoover was wounded, but despite the pain he suffered, he remained in his forward position, pouring heavy fire into the ranks of the charging enemy. The tremendous pressure being exerted by the hostile troops forced the friendly platoon to withdraw to higher ground, but Private Hoover voluntarily remained behind to provide covering fire for his comrades. When the area was recaptured by the friendly troops several hours later, Private Hoover was found dead in his position surrounded by the lifeless bodies of seven enemy soldiers. His self-sacrifice and great fighting spirit prevented numerous friendly casualties and so inspired his comrades that they completely routed the hostile force from the area.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 250 (May 16, 1952)
Home Town: Preble, Ohio

*HOPKINS, WILLARD H.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Willard H. Hopkins (RA38518804), Sergeant First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Headquarters Company, 3d Battalion, 7th Cavalry Regiment (Task Force 777), 1st Cavalry Division. Sergeant First Class Hopkins distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces at Hambung-ni, Korea, on the night of 26 - 27 September 1950. Shortly after midnight, while the task force was moving northward to link with other United Nations elements, the leading column was suddenly ambushed ninety-eight miles behind enemy lines by a hostile force of ten T-34 tanks supported by infantry. As the enemy tanks opened fire on the column, despite the reigning confusion and trepidation following the surprise, Sergeant First Class Hopkins coolly went into immediate action. Seeing that one tank had penetrated to a vantage point that would bring the entire column under it fire, he, under a continuous rain of machine-gun bullets and flying shrapnel, gathered grenades from his comrades and boldly advanced on the tank. Upon reaching it and finding the hatch open, he quickly mounted the turret and threw eight grenades inside, silencing the crew. Without pausing, Sergeant Hopkins quickly organized a bazooka crew and moved toward the thick of the fighting. When the bazooka rounds were expended, he voluntarily traversed the fire-swept road for additional ammunition. While moving to the rear, he came under the direct assault of a hostile tank that was firing alternately into troops and vehicles as it blasted its way through the friendly position. Once again, armed only with grenades and a rifle, he fearlessly mounted the rear of the moving enemy tank. As he attempted to reach the tank's turret, a shouted warning from a comrade caused him to leap to a ditch seeking cover as friendly artillery opened direct fire on the tank. The hostile tank returned fire, and in the burst of those shells Sergeant Hopkins was killed.
General Headquarters Far East Command: General Orders No. 21 (February 3, 1951)
Home Town: Sabine, Louisiana

HORNE, DELLNO
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Dellno Horne, Sergeant First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company A, 1st Battalion, 38th Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division. Sergeant First Class Horne distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Panmegi-ri, Korea, on 18 May 1951. On that date, Company A was deployed in defensive positions near Panmegi-ri when a numerically superior enemy launched an attack against the company positions. As Sergeant Horne was about to launch a counterattack with eight men against a high hill held by the enemy, his weapon was shot from his hands. Undaunted though unarmed, Sergeant Horne gallantly led his men in a daring frontal assault on the hill. His fierce attack took the enemy completely by surprise and they were forced to flee, thereby enabling Company A to establish more favorable positions. A short while later three members of the company were observed to be surrounded by enemy troops on a nearby hill. Sergeant Horne, with a machine-gun that he had acquired, rushed to the assistance of the beleaguered men. Although fully exposed to intense enemy small-arms and automatic-weapons fire, he calmly delivered a steady stream of fire on the enemy, thereby drawing attention from the surrounded men and enabling them to break through the encirclement and rejoin the company.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 474 (June 29, 1951)

*HOTCHKISS, WILLIAM H.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to William H. Hotchkiss (0-1339721), First Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company B, 1st Battalion, 19th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division. First Lieutenant Hotchkiss distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces along the Kum River north of Taejon, Korea, on 16 July 1950. On that date, Lieutenant Hotchkiss distinguished himself during an enemy attack on a defensive position held by his company. After several hours of intense fighting the enemy occupied about a dozen foxholes in the company and had set up four machine-guns which were covering most of the company area. Lieutenant Hotchkiss, who was executive officer of the company, realizing the seriousness of the enemy position, voluntarily led a group of five men in an effort to drive the enemy out. He took an M-1 rifle and about one dozen grenades and began clearing the dike of all enemy. He would drop a grenade in foxholes containing enemy and fire his M-1 at those beyond range of grenades. During his assault he stopped long enough to bandage wounds of one of his men that had been hit by enemy fire. He then continued his assault on the enemy and always moving forward, had succeeded in destroying all the enemy except for one machine gun nest. At this time he was wounded in both legs by machine-gun fire. After he was wounded he continued firing from where he fell until he was finally killed by the enemy. His actions inspired the men in the platoon to drive the enemy from the platoon positions.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 24 (August 12, 1950)
Home Town: Rock, Wisconsin

*HOVEY, HOWARD CLEASBY (MIA)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Howard Cleasby Hovey (0-6152613), Master Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company A, 1st Battalion, 17th Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division. Master Sergeant Hovey distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Sokkogae, Korea, on 6 July 1953. On that date, Sergeant Hovey and other members of the company were on duty in the company command post when their position was suddenly attacked by a vicious, numerically superior enemy force. With total disregard for his own life, Sergeant Hovey left the comparative safety of his bunker, moved into a nearby trench and directed a hail of fire at hostile troops, temporarily repulsing several attempts to overrun friendly positions. Aware that the dangerous proximity of the determined, reinforced enemy posed an imminent threat to the defense of the entire post, Sergeant Hovey, arming himself with a carbine and hand grenades, moved from the cover of the trench, spotted the enemy advancing within about fifty yards of the post and charged the enemy, pouring crippling fire and throwing grenades at the assailants, inflicting numerous casualties and checking their advance. Although wounded by automatic weapons during the ensuing action, he continued firing until he was again critically wounded by a napalm grenade. Feeling that the lives of other members were still endangered, he grabbed another carbine and grenades and again left the bunker area, maintaining his stand and firing his weapon and throwing grenades until he was mortally wounded by a direct hit from another enemy grenade. Through his indomitable fighting spirit and courageous actions, he enabled other members of the command post to evacuate the bunker, establish operations in another position, and eventually stem the onslaught. Master Sergeant Hovey's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Department of the Army: General Orders No. 3 (January 20, 1954)
Home Town: Jefferson, New York

HUFF, GILMON A.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Gilmon A. Huff (0-408081), Lieutenant Colonel (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as Commanding Officer of the 2d Battalion, 7th Cavalry Regiment (Infantry), 1st Cavalry Division. Lieutenant Colonel Huff distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces near Chonpou, Korea, on 10 October 1950. On that date, when the battalion was engaged in the mission of attacking across the Yaesong-gang River in an attempt to capture the important city of Paekchan, Colonel Huff accompanied the lead company. Advancing on their objective, the lead company came under intense enemy small-arms fire from three sides which caused it to become disorganized and start falling back. Rallying and reorganizing these scattered troops, Colonel Huff shifted them to flank defenses and ordered a second company to pass through the first and renew the attack. This second company, personally led by Colonel Huff, also came under intense fire and received several banzai charges. Although seriously wounded in repelling a banzai charge, he refused to be evacuated for four hours, but chose to remain and hold his companies together by sheer leadership and his inspiring fearlessness. Not until he had reorganized and instilled his battalion with his courageous determination to such a high degree that they routed the enemy and captured the objective, would Colonel Huff permit himself to be ordered by a medical officer to relinquish is command and be evacuated.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 52 (February 2, 1951)
Home Town: Greenville, South Carolina

HUFFMAN, RUSSELL LEROY
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Russell Leroy Huffman (RA15263292), Sergeant First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company I, 3d Battalion, 187th Airborne Regimental Combat Team, 11th Airborne Division. Sergeant First Class Huffman distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces near Kumwha, North Korea, on the night of 30 September 1952. On that night, Sergeant Huffman and his squad were manning an outpost position when numerically superior forces attacked their position with automatic weapons and grenades. Notifying his company of the situation, Sergeant Huffman was advised he could withdraw, but he chose to hold his position, despite the overwhelming enemy forces. In the vicious fire-fight that ensued, Sergeant Huffman was seriously wounded in the neck, head, hand, and thigh by a grenade, but without regard to his wounds he continually exposed himself to the enemy fire, moving among his men, expertly directing their fire and shouting encouragement. So accurate and deadly was the squad's fire that the enemy attack was repulsed in complete disorganization, with a heavy toll of casualties. After the enemy forces were routed, Sergeant Huffman discovered his telephone had been destroyed by a grenade blast and dispatched a member of his squad to request ammunition, medical aid, and to inform the company of the situation. When medical aid arrived they determined Sergeant Huffman and two other wounded members of his squad would have to be evacuated. Although bleeding profusely from his painful wounds, Sergeant Huffman refused treatment until the other wounded were treated and safely evacuated.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 270 (March 10, 1953)
Home Town: Columbiana, Ohio

HUGHES, DAVID R.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to David R. Hughes, First Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as Commanding Officer, Company K, 3d Battalion, 7th Cavalry Regiment (Infantry), 1st Cavalry Division. First Lieutenant Hughes distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Sokkogae, Korea, on 7 October 1951. On that date, the company which Lieutenant Hughes commanded was engaged in an assault against a large hostile force occupying a strategic hill. As the battle raged, the enemy, holding commanding positions, hurled countless grenades down the slope toward the friendly troops. This, in conjunction with a heavy volume of small-arms and automatic weapons fire, was responsible for numerous casualties among the assaulting element. From his command post, Lieutenant Hughes observed that his badly decimated force was in imminent danger of annihilation. Rapidly organizing all of the able-bodied men about him, he moved forward to lead a new attack. Reaching the hard-pressed men, he shouted words of encouragement to them and then single-handedly advanced against the enemy positions. Disregarding the concentrated fire of the foe, he charged to the crest of the hill, fired his automatic weapon until it no longer functioned, and then pressed the attack solely with grenades. His audacious assault completely demoralized the enemy and, as he moved among them fighting fiercely, his men charged up the slope and engaged the hostile troops in close combat. Imbued with his fearlessness, the friendly troops fought their way over the crest of the hill, inflicting heavy casualties on the foe and securing the objective.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 131 (March 6, 1952)

HUGHES, JOHN C.
(First Award)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to John C. Hughes (0-58930), Captain (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as Commanding Officer of Company K, 3d Battalion, 35th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division. Captain Hughes distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces near Chuam, Korea, on 3 September 1950. Within a six hour period, Captain Hughes' company was attacked five times by a battalion of the enemy. When the communications, disrupted by enemy fire, made the loss of centralized control imminent, Captain Hughes, disregarding his personal safety and exposing himself to enemy fire, ran from position to position directing and supervising the fire being placed on the enemy. His fearlessness and the manner in which he repeatedly braved the incessant rain of bullets and shell fragments in order to coordinate the Company's fire power were the prime factors in repelling the five attacks and achieving an overwhelming victory.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 20 (January 13, 1951)
Other Award: Distinguished Service Cross w/OLC (Korea)

HUGHES, JOHN C.
(Second Award)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting a Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster in lieu of a Second Award of the Distinguished Service Cross to John C. Hughes (0-58930), Captain (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as Commanding Officer of Company K, 3d Battalion, 35th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division. Captain Hughes distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces at Ung-Pong, Korea, on 27 November 1950. Learning of an enemy breach through the right flank of his company's sector which, seriously threatened the perimeter, Captain Hughes led a small force up a slope through mortar, grenade, and small-arms fire. Although wounded, he refused medical aid, gained the crest of the ridge, and recaptured a portion of the lost ground. Later, when enemy machine-gun fire raked his unit, he led a daring charge on the emplacement which annihilated the hostile crew with grenade and rifle fire and routed the remaining enemy from the ridge. Captain Hughes remained on the perimeter, repeatedly exposed himself to heavy fire to direct the defense until daylight, and refused evacuation until assured that the enemy attack was definitely repulsed.
War Department General Orders No. 91 (October 24, 1951)
Home Town: Williamson, Illinois
Other Award: Distinguished Service Cross (Korea)

*HUNDLEY, COLEMAN C.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Coleman C. Hundley (RA13293298), Corporal, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company F, 2d Battalion, 7th Cavalry Regiment (Infantry), 1st Cavalry Division. Corporal Hundley distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces near Waegwan, Korea, on 6 August 1950. On that date, while leading a reconnaissance patrol three miles behind enemy lines, Corporal Hundley ordered his men to take cover in a stone house when they were fired upon. They returned the fire until the enemy began closing in. Corporal Hundley then ordered his patrol to withdraw to higher ground. Although seriously wounded in the action, he covered the withdrawal until each man had reached safety. Corporal Hundley then joined his patrol, reorganized them, and ordered them to return without him. By electing to remain behind to die of his wounds, Corporal Hundley's extraordinary heroism in action permitted his patrol to withdraw safely.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 129 (October 21, 1950)
Home Town: Henry, Virginia

*HURR, DAVID A.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to David A. Hurr (RA17268393), Private, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company E, 2d Battalion, 5th Cavalry Regiment (Infantry), 1st Cavalry Division. Private Hurr distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces at Kumch'on, Korea, on 1 and 2 August 1950. During the late afternoon of 1 August 1950, Company E, 5th Cavalry Regiment, to which Private Hurr was attached as a gunner, came under furious assault from hordes of enemy soldiers. In the bitter and intense battle that ensued, he was severely wounded in the stomach by a mortar fragment, but refused evacuation and steadfastly continued to man his heavy machine-gun and deliver devastating fire into the ranks of the stubborn assailants. In the early morning hours of 2 August 1950, when the unit was finally ordered to withdraw in the face of increased and extremely intense hostile fire from this numerically superior enemy force, Private Hurr voluntarily remained at his position to provide protective fire for his comrades during the withdrawal. With indomitable courage and determination, he continued to sweep the assaulting force until his ammunition was expended. When last seen alive, armed with only his rifle, he was delivering deadly accurate fire into the charging foe. When the strongpoint was regained later in the day, his body was found beside his gun, with numerous enemy dead lying in his field of fire. The voluntary and heroic stand he took in the face of utmost peril resulting hi his death enabled his comrades to make an orderly withdrawal and evacuate the wounded.
Department of the Army: General Orders No. 91 (October 24, 1951)
Home Town: Becker, Minnesota

*HURT, DONALD J.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Donald J. Hurt (NG25743146), Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as a Platoon Sergeant with Company G, 2d Battalion, 279th Infantry Regiment, 45th Infantry Division. Sergeant Hurt distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Pokkea Ridge in the Yonchon-Chorwan area of Korea on 10 April 1952. While conducting a night patrol operation, Sergeant Hurt was leading his platoon through an abandoned village when they came under intense fire from enemy automatic weapons located on a small hill. After insuring that the platoon was in the proper defensive position, Sergeant Hurt fearlessly started up the hill with his carbine and several grenades to engage the enemy. At this time, he was knocked down and seriously wounded by a grenade blast. Completely disregarding his wounds, he managed to get back on his feet and throw several grenades to silence an enemy automatic weapon which was located on the forward slope of the hill. Additional enemy automatic weapons fire was now coming from the top of the hill and from the left right slopes. Continuing to ignore the pain caused by his wounds, Sergeant Hurt called for an artillery barrage to neutralize the enemy positions. Only after all enemy fire had ceased did he finally consent to be evacuated for medical treatment. The gallantry and aggressiveness displayed by Sergeant Hurt directly resulted in routing the enemy and minimizing the casualties suffered by his comrades in this battle.
Department of the Army: General Orders No. 3 (February 15, 1983)
Home Town: Creek, Oklahoma

HUTCHIN, CLAIRE E.
(First Award)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Claire E. Hutchin, Lieutenant Colonel (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 1st Battalion, 23d Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division. Lieutenant Colonel Hutchin distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces near Changyong, Korea, on 31 August 1950. On that date, the North Korean forces made a fierce attack in overwhelming numbers along the entire sixteen thousand yard front being held by the 1st Battalion, and broke through the river defenses of Companies B and C almost immediately. In the face of almost certain disaster, Colonel Hutchin formulated a plan for assembling his battalion and reorganizing it into an effective fighting force. This was accomplished with such success that the enemy was prevented from making any further penetration. During the entire battle the 1st Battalion was under constant attack by an enemy with apparently unlimited manpower. In the course of the action the enemy suffered over three hundred casualties. In all of this extremely difficult time, Colonel Hutchin maintained an attitude of cheerful confidence, and personally led units and men into designated positions, exposing himself to the enemy fire constantly while doing so. His coolness and decisive actions were the major factor in maintaining a strong "pocket" behind the enemy's front lines astride one of the enemy's main supply routes. In the course of this action, a counterattacking battalion from another American unit was cut off and surrounded in the vicinity of the 1st Battalion, and Colonel Hutchin, on his own initiative, assumed command of these additional forces in his area, organizing the positions of both battalions in such a way that further enemy attacks were completely futile. For a period of almost two days, Colonel Hutchin continuously exposed himself to what appeared to be certain death in order to maintain the morale of his men. His cheerfulness and confidence during this period were unfailing, and a source of tremendous inspiration to all of his officers and men.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 196 (December 14, 1950)
Other Award: Distinguished Service Cross w/OLC (Korea)

HUTCHIN, CLAIRE E.
(Second Award)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting a Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster in lieu of a Second Award of the Distinguished Service Cross to Claire E. Hutchin, Lieutenant Colonel (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while Commanding 1st Battalion, 23d Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division. Lieutenant Colonel Hutchin distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Kujang-dong, Korea, from 25 through 30 November 1950. During this period, the 1st Battalion was engaged in a series of defensive actions, counterattacks and withdrawals being conducted against superior enemy forces by the 23d Infantry Regiment. On the morning of 28 November 1950, Company C was driven from its positions by a numerically superior enemy unit, with a resultant loss of equipment and weapons and the company was completely disorganized. Learning that all the company officers and a majority of the senior noncommissioned officers were either killed or wounded in this engagement, Colonel Hutchin quickly went to the unit's position, reorganized the remnants of the company, and personally led the remaining men in a counterattack to regain the positions. In the face of extremely heavy enemy small-arms fire, Colonel Hutchin personally directed and led this operation, succeeded in recovering the greater part of the lost equipment, and relieved groups of men of Company C who had been surrounded when the positions were overrun. That afternoon, when the 1st Battalion was designated as rear guard for the Second Division's withdrawal from Kujang-dong, Colonel Hutchin personally took command of the rear guard element, consisting of one rifle company and a company of tanks. The pursuing enemy force, estimated at two battalions, pressed hard on the rear of the division's column, which was forced to move slowly due to traffic congestion. Each time the column was forced to halt, the enemy would attack the rear guard from both flanks, using small arms, automatic weapons and grenades. During one of these attacks, Colonel Hutchin was painfully wounded in the face by flying shrapnel, but remained in control, brilliantly directing the defensive actions of the rear guard with outstanding success.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 558 (July 19, 1951)
Other Award: Distinguished Service Cross (Korea)

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