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Full Text Citations For Award of

The Distinguished Service Cross
 U.S. Army Recipients  - Korea 

  S - Z  

To All Who Shall See These Presents Greeting:

This is to Certify that
The President of the United States of America
Takes Pride in Presenting


THE 
DISTINGUISHED SERVICE CROSS
to

SAKOWSKI, JOHN M.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to John M. Sakowski (0-61483), First Lieutenant (Field Artillery), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Battery C, 37th Field Artillery Battalion, 2d Infantry Division as an Artillery Forward Observer attached to an Infantry Company. First Lieutenant Sakowski distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Pia-ri, Korea, on 22 September 1951. On that date, the friendly force to which Lieutenant Sakowski was attached was assigned the mission of attacking and securing a heavily fortified hill from a numerically superior enemy force. As the friendly troops advanced along the precipitous slope, they were subjected to a devastating volume of fire from well protected enemy bunkers. Realizing that the assaulting troops were constantly exposed to the intense enemy fire, Lieutenant Sakowski immediately moved forward in an open position on the fire-swept terrain in order to direct the fire of friendly artillery batteries against the enemy emplacements. He was painfully wounded almost immediately by the enemy fire. Although he was unable to move because of the nature of his wounds, Lieutenant Sakowski steadfastly refused to be evacuated because he knew he could not be replaced and that effective artillery fire was critically needed. He remained in his position for eighteen hours, directing artillery fire with deadly precision and enabling the friendly forces to hold their positions.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 30 (January 16, 1952)
Home Town: Middlesex, Massachusetts

*SALENIEKS, AIVARS K.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Aivars K. Salenieks (RA16404084), Private, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company L, 3d Battalion, 279th Infantry Regiment, 45th Infantry Division. Private Salenieks distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces at Ku-dong, Korea, on 18 October 1952. Private Salenieks was a member of a squad occupying a position on the main line of resistance. Shortly after midnight, friendly forces were subjected to an intense and accurate barrage of enemy artillery and mortar fire and a company of hostile troops stormed the position. Two friendly gun emplacements were neutralized by the heavy fire and the enemy overran one of the trenches, isolating Private Salenieks an four comrades from the rest of the company. In the ensuing action, he directed accurate rifle fire at the enemy troops approaching from the rear while his comrades warded off a frontal attack. After he had killed two the charging foe and wounded several others, the enemy hurled a grenade into their bunker and Private Salenieks lost his life when it exploded.
Department of the Army: General Orders No. 49 (June 9, 1953)
Home Town: Kalamazoo, Michigan

SAMS, CRAWFORD F.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Crawford F. Sams, Brigadier General (Medical Corps), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as Chief, Public Health and Welfare Section, United Nations Command. Brigadier General Sams distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the Republic of Korea on 13 and 14 March 1951. General Sams acquitted himself with rare distinction as head of a special operations group whose hazardous mission of personally determining the possible presence of a pestilential disease among personnel of enemy forces dictated deep infiltration into enemy-held territory. Although information had been received from ashore that other landing parties had been captured and the operation was known to the enemy and could result in a trap, General Sams nevertheless continued on his mission. Through rough surf under the cover of darkness and potential threat of enemy shore fortifications and capture by a ruthless foe, General Sams and his party of three embarked in a small boat from an off-shore rendezvous at 2000 on the night of 13 March 1951, later transferring to a four-man rubber raft and arrived ashore three hours later. Reaching the beach, he proceeded inland and interrogated friendly personnel and evaluated vital information obtained the through sustained personal reconnaissance of enemy-held territory, including military hospitals and native villages. At 0230 on 14 March 1951, General Sam's party returned to the off-shore rendezvous with conclusive information of such significance as to effect the immediate conduct of the United Nations armed effort in Korea.
General Headquarters Far East Command: General Orders No. 94 (April 20, 1951)

SANDERFORD, HOMER E.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Homer E. Sanderford, Corporal, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company C, 1st Battalion, 5th Cavalry Regiment (Infantry), 1st Cavalry Division. Corporal Sanderford distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces near Taegu, Korea, on 21 September 1950. Corporal Sanderford's company was engaged in an attack in an attempt to seize vital high ground and encountered heavy enemy machine-gun and automatic-weapons fire and was pinned down. Despite the heavy volume of enemy fire and with an additional hazard form overhead supporting fire from friendly troops, he voluntarily and without regard for his own personal safety, rose to his feet and began to advance aggressively on the enemy. When he made his way about 150 yards, he began to throw grenades at the enemy, continuing this until he exhausted his supply. He then commenced firing on the enemy with his rifle until he also exhausted his ammunition. Withdrawing and replenishing his supplies four times, he repeatedly and heroically assaulted the enemy position. When his comrades, inspired by his fearlessness and enabled by the confusion caused in the enemy ranks, overran the enemy position a total of seventeen enemy dead were counted in the area of his single- handed assaults.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 79 (February 17, 1951)

*SARDESON, ARNOLD L.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Arnold L. Sardeson (US55209325), Private, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as a Medical Aidman with an Infantry Company of the 224th Infantry Regiment, 40th Infantry Division. Private Sardeson distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Mandae-ri, Korea, on the night of 1 May 1953. On that date, Private Sardeson was Aidman for a United Nations patrol that was forced to withdraw under an intense enemy mortar and artillery barrage. Upon hearing the cries of men wounded in the action, he voluntarily left his bunker and went to their aid. He treated one man and carried him back to the main line. With no thought of his own safety, Private Sardeson returned to forward area, treated a second comrade, and evacuated him to the rear. Noticing a wounded Korean soldier lying completely exposed to the enemy barrage, Private Sardeson again braved the heavy incoming fire and ran to his assistance. While treating the third United Nations soldier Private Sardeson was killed instantly by an enemy mortar round. Through his courageous self-sacrifice and unflinching devotion to duty, he personally saved the lives of two comrades.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 900 (October 1, 1953)
Home Town: Sioux City, Iowa

*SAUNDERS, HARRY J.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Harry J. Saunders (RA14107701), Sergeant First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company E, 2d Battalion, 27th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division. Sergeant First Class Saunders distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces near Chindong-ni, Korea, on 2 August 1950. Sergeant First Class Saunders was in charge of a group of men who had secured the line of departure for the 1st Battalion near Chindong-ni, Korea, and were returning in two vehicles through a mountain pass when they were subjected to concentrated hostile fire from commanding positions on their flanks. Dismounting the men, Sergeant Saunders deployed them to positions of relative safety and moved the vehicle out of the line of fire. Hen then made a rapid reconnaissance of the position to find an escape route for the group. In doing so he was wounded by enemy fire but continued his efforts. When the position became untenable, Sergeant Saunders, although wounded, loaded the men into one vehicle and placing himself in an exposed position, delivered devastating fire on the enemy until he was mortally wounded.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 169 (November 13, 1950)
Home Town: Jefferson, Alabama

SCHAUER, ERNEST J.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Ernest J. Schauer, Captain (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as Commanding Officer of Company G, 2d Battalion, 38th Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division. Captain Schauer distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Sibi- ri, Korea, on 6 September 1950. On this date Captain Schauer was assigned the mission of utilizing his company in an attack to seize and hold a strategic hill, defended by a well-entrenched, numerically superior enemy force. In the face of intense enemy automatic weapons fire and grenades, Captain Schauer's lead platoons were twice forced to withdraw with heavy casualties. While assisting in the evacuation of wounded under the intense enemy fire, he found that the success of his mission was seriously endangered due to the threatened disorderly withdrawal of his men. Returning to the rear of his retreating troops, he reorganized them and personally led a third attack up the hill in the face of bitter resistance. When the aggressiveness of the attack began to weaken, and it became apparent that the attack would again fail, Captain Schauer, with a view to instilling courage in his disheartened troops, leaped up and dashed forward into the very face of the enemy positions, hurling grenades and sweeping the area with bursts of fire from his automatic weapon. Captain Schauer's troops, inspired by his actions and evident disregard for personal safety, rallied to overrun the enemy positions and successfully accomplished their mission. By his actions, an untold number of men, wounded and unable to withdraw, were saved. Captain Schauer's total disregard for personal safety and willingness to exercise the rare prerogative of self-sacrifice, instilled in his men a brand of courage that enabled them to accomplish their mission in the face of overwhelming odds.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 136 (October 26, 1950)

*SCHIERMAN, THEODORE A.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Theodore A. Schierman (RA39482804), Sergeant First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company G, 2d Battalion, 7th Cavalry Regiment (Infantry), 1st Cavalry Division. Sergeant First Class Schierman distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces near Tuksong-dong, Korea, on 10 August 1950. Sergeant First Class Schierman was in command of a combat patrol en-route to establish an outpost when it was pinned down by a hail of deadly semi-automatic and automatic- weapons fire. Realizing that the lives of the men in his patrol were in danger, Sergeant Schierman, without thought of his own personal safety, moved through the enemy fire to a new position. From there he deliberately laid a heavy volume of fire on the enemy in order to draw all of their fire on his position. This selfless act enabled his comrades to withdraw to safety. Artillery was called for and directed on the enemy position, neutralizing their fire. Sergeant Schierman than regrouped his patrol and again led his comrades into enemy territory. Once more the patrol was pinned down, this time by fire from an anti-tank gun. Courageously, he maneuvered to a position from which he single-handedly destroyed the anti-tank gun, permitting him to move forward with his patrol and accomplish his mission.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 113 (March 4, 1951)
Home Town: Whitman, Washington

*SCHMITT, EDWARD
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Edward Schmitt (0-1326929), First Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as Commanding Officer of Company H, 2d Battalion, 9th Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division. First Lieutenant Schmitt distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces near Yongsan, Korea on the Naktong-gang River line, during the period 31 August 1950 through 3 September 1950. On the night of 31 August 1950 the entire front of the Ninth Infantry Division was heavily attacked by two divisions of the enemy who penetrated the lines of the regiment and surrounded some of its units. Lieutenant Schmitt assumed command of a group of about seventy men, consisting largely of members of Companies H and D. Fully realizing the critical position of the group, he took charge immediately and organized a perimeter defense. On the morning of 1 September 1950, the enemy began the first of many fanatical attacks against the position. All day and all night the attacks continued. One attack after another was repulsed. Lieutenant Schmitt moved form man to man on the perimeter, displaying great courage and inspiring leadership. He explained to his men the importance of holding the position, thereby delaying the enemy's advance and allowing the regiment time to regroup and counterattack. Under his dominant leadership men rose to great heights of bravery and daring. Some left the perimeter to gather weapons and ammunition from enemy dead and to attack and destroy enemy machine-guns. On 2 September 1950, Lieutenant Schmitt gained radio contact with his battalion and requested an air drop of water and ammunition. His men were suffering greatly from lack of water and some of them were delirious. Nevertheless, under his leadership they continued to fight off the enemy's continued fanatical attacks and pile up enemy dead in hundreds on the hillside. He was wounded as he supervised the recovery of the air drop, but continued his duties although very weak from thirst, hunger, and loss of blood. Lieutenant Schmitt transmitted his last message of 3 September 1950, informing his commanders of the group's situation and stating that he and his men would fight on no matter what happened. Late on the same day his radio sustained a direct hit and was destroyed. Still later on the same day, he was mortally wounded as he continued to move among his wounded and dying men.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 54 (February 6, 1951)
Home Town: Camden, New Jersey

*SCHMITT, ROBERT G.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Robert G. Schmitt (0-57429), First Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company M, 3d Battalion, 31st Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division. First Lieutenant Schmitt distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of the Changjin (Chosin) Reservoir in North Korea, on 1 December 1950. Lieutenant Schmitt's regiment was assigned to mission of effecting a withdrawal and attempting a juncture with the FIRST Marine Division at Hagaru-ri. Following assembly of a motor convoy with Company M committed to provide security for the right flank, Lieutenant Schmitt, having sustained a severe leg injury in a previous encounter, was ordered to ride in a vehicle with other wounded. After proceeding several miles, the column was halted by a roadblock, and devastating fire rained down from strongly fortified positions on three surrounding hills. With mounting casualties and fast dwindling ammunition, the morale of the men was badly shaken. Although suffering greatly from his wound, he voluntarily left his transportation to rally, organize, and lead an assault against the enemy positions. Giving his carbine to an unarmed man and improvising a stick for a crutch, he struggled forward, and the men, rising to the challenge of their valiant leader, followed him in a determined attack against the fanatical fore. Progressing with extreme difficulty oh his makeshift crutch, he continued to lead the attack through withering fire until he was struck by a machine-gun bullet and fell mortally wounded. Refusing medical treatment, he urged the men to press the assault. Inspired by his incredible display of valor, his resolute soldiers charged with such ferocity that the hostile positions were overrun and the enemy was routed from the hill.
Department of the Army: General Orders No. 107 (December 14, 1951)
Home Town: Wells, North Dakota

*SCHULZE, PAUL R.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Paul R. Schulze (0-947563), First Lieutenant (Field Artillery), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Battery C, 96th Field Artillery Battalion, X Corps. First Lieutenant Schulze distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Yong-hung, Korea, on 7 November 1950. On that date, at approximately 0330 hours the Battalion Command Post was viciously attacked by a hostile force which penetrated the artillery perimeter and gained firing vantage and observation. Lieutenant Schultze and six other men were posted to prevent an enemy flanking movement. Shielded by cover of darkness, the determined foe pressed nearer and Lieutenant Schultze, realizing the tactical advantage of illuminating their area of approach, dashed through a hail of fire to a weapons carrier and turned on its headlights to illuminate the enemy. The alert enemy immediately concentrated intense fire on the truck and Lieutenant Schultze, miraculously escaping death, returned to his position and continued to ward off the assailants with rifle and grenade fire. When a burst from a hostile mortar ignited a nearby vehicle, Lieutenant Schultz exposed himself to withering barrages of fire as he extinguished the blaze before it could spread to the ammunition trucks. During this daring action enemy fire increased in intensity, and, upon reaching his post, Lieutenant Schultze discovered that his comrades had withdrawn. Despite bursting shells and exploding ammunition vehicles, he continued to defy the enemy and kept his lone vigil until mortally wounded by enemy mortar fire.
General Headquarters Far East Command: General Orders No. 137 (May 26, 1951)
Home Town: Salt Lake City, Utah

SCHWARTZE, FRANCIS L.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Francis L. Schwartze (US55150054), Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company G, 2d Battalion, 38th Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division. Sergeant Schwartze distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces at Taptong-ni, Korea, on 20 September 1952. Committed to capture the left sector of "Old Baldy," Sergeant Schwartze's platoon spearheaded an attack against hostile bunkers on the military crest of the key terrain and, despite bitter resistance, routed the defenders and secured the strongpoint. Constantly vulnerable to heavy fire from emplacements on commanding ground, Sergeant Schwartze deployed the troops in defensive positions for imminent attack. Rallying a small force, he advanced to meet the onslaught. Inspired by his unflinching courage, the men stormed forward with such tenacity the enemy was forced to retreat. Despite a wound sustained in this action, he moved to the rear, obtained a light machine-gun from the second assault platoon, returned through intense hostile fire, and positioned the weapon for maximum defense. The determined foe then launched a frontal and right-flank assault in an attempt to overrun the position. As the battle increased in fury, Sergeant Schwartze observed a wounded comrade lying in the fire-swept impact area. He charged forward and killed four enemy soldiers with his carbine. His ammunition expended, he eliminated a fifth with the butt of his weapon and dispersed the remainder. Although wounded a second time, he courageously went to the aid of the stricken man and carried him to safety. While reorganizing to resume the attack, he was critically wounded by a grenade and evacuated.
Department of the Army: General Orders No. 37 (April 29, 1953).
Home Town: Saline, Missouri

*SEARS, JEROME F.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Jerome F. Sears (US56085844), Sergeant First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company B, 1st Battalion, 180th Infantry Regiment, 45th Infantry Division. Sergeant First Class Sears distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Sidamak, Korea, on 8 June 1952. On that date, the company of which Sergeant Sears was a member was ordered to occupy and hold a hill recently captured by friendly forces. Sergeant Sears acted as an artillery observer with a small screening party located in positions approximately two hundred yards forward of the friendly perimeter. That evening, although he could have returned to the main unit, Sergeant Sears voluntarily remained with the small party in its advance position. Early the following morning, the friendly troops were hit by an intense hostile artillery and mortar bombardment. Painfully wounded by flying shrapnel, Sergeant Sears nevertheless remained at his post, offering advice and encouragement to his men. Suddenly he saw an enemy force advancing recklessly through the exploding shells and shouted to his comrades to get ready to meet the attack. As wave after wave of enemy troops appeared, charging fanatically toward the friendly positions, Sergeant Sears realized his small party would be engulfed and annihilated if they attempted to overcome the vast numerical superiority of the enemy. Shouting to his men to move back, he remained at his post and began to fire rapidly and accurately into the ranks of the advancing enemy. With complete disregard for his personal safety, he continued to cover the withdrawal of his men until the foe overran his position and ended his courageous stand.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 701 (November 15, 1952)
Home Town: Multnomah, Oregon

SHANHOLTZ, CHARLES L.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Charles L. Shanholtz (RA13338434), Private, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company D, 1st Battalion, 19th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division. Private Shanholtz distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces near Taepyon-ni, Korea, on 16 July 1950. On that date, the mortar position manned by members of Private Shanholtz's squad was being attacked by an enemy force of superior numbers. A grenade was thrown into the position and Private Shanholtz, without regard for his own personal safety, quickly threw it out. Once again, a grenade was thrown into the position and again he threw it out, and in doing so was wounded. The extraordinary heroism exhibited by Private Shanholtz on this occasion reflects great credit on himself and is in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service. and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 7 (July 23, 1950)
Home Town: Frederick, Virginia

SHELL, BUSTER
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Buster Shell (RA14323453), Private First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company L, 3d Battalion, 7th Cavalry Regiment (Infantry), 1st Cavalry Division. Private First Class Shell distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces near Hukkyo- ri, Korea, on 18 October 1950. An infantry company, attacking the high ground along the main highway leading into the North Korean capitol of Pyongyang, was halted by a heavy concentration of flat trajectory fire from concealed enemy positions. This enemy fire was becoming increasingly effective, and every effort was being made to find the source. Private Shell suddenly shouted that he had discovered the location and that the fire was from two enemy tanks. Disregarding his own safety, he voluntarily moved forward, armed only with a loaded rocket launcher, into the enemy fire to within fifty yards of the first enemy tank and destroyed it with his only rocket. He then returned to his original position, reloaded his launcher, and fearlessly moved up until he was within point-blank range of the second tank, and then destroyed it. His extreme courage and outstanding devotion to duty at great risk to his own life broke up an enemy roadblock and enabled his company continue their attack on Pyongyang.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 204 (December 20, 1950)
Home Town: Carter, Tennessee

SHELLEY, CHADWICK G.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Chadwick G. Shelley (51051060), Private First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company L, 3d Battalion, 19th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division. Private First Class Shelley distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Kumsong, Korea, on 13 October 1951. On that date, Private Shelley advanced with the assaulting elements of his company as they launched an attack against a numerically superior hostile force occupying well-fortified emplacements on a key terrain feature. As the friendly troops neared the objective, they were subjected to an intense volume of enemy small-arms and automatic weapons fire which forced them to seek cover on the bare slope. Realizing the need for immediate aggressive action, Private Shelley charged around the flank of his platoon and single-handedly killed several enemy soldiers in hand-to-hand combat. Observing a machine-gun in an enemy bunker preparing to fire on his comrades, he quickly leaped into a connecting trench and threw a grenade into the emplacement. After entering the bunker and capturing its occupants, he turned them over to his comrades and resumed his assault. He moved from one enemy position to the next, alternately throwing grenades and firing his rifle with deadly accuracy until a strong bunker which was the key to the enemy defense network temporarily pinned him down with heavy fire. After the emplacement had been silenced by friendly tank fire, Private Shelley charged forward once more and, inspired by his fearless actions, his comrades followed him and routed the enemy from the objective.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 84 (February 9, 1952)
Home Town: Colden, New York

*SHELTON, WILLIAM B. (POW)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to William B. Shelton (RA19293680), Corporal [then Private First Class], U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as a platoon scout with Company B, 1st Battalion, 35th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division. Corporal Shelton distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces near Haman, Korea, on 19 August 1950. On that date, Company B launched an attack against the enemy who were entrenched on a ridge near Haman. Corporal Shelton was advancing toward the objective when he came upon an enemy soldier crouching behind a boulder. He kicked the weapon from the hands of the enemy, shot him, then shifted his fire and killed two more enemy who were only a few yards away. During this action the platoon machine-gunner and his assistant were killed while trying to put their gun into operation. Although partially blinded by blood which was flowing from a head wound he had received, Corporal Shelton ran to the machine-gun position, removed the bodies of his comrades, set up the gun, and delivered devastating fire on the enemy, which was instrumental in the success of the company's attack.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 187 (April 5, 1951), as amended by General Orders No. 209 (1951)
Home Town: Contra Costa, California

*SHEPARD, FLOYD
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Floyd Shepard (RA17290320), Private First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company L, 3d Battalion, 31st Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division. Private First Class Shepard distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Oetook-tang, Korea, on 8 June 1951. On that date, Company L was engaged in an attack against a hill held by a well-entrenched hostile force. During this attack, the 3d platoon, of which Private Shepard was a member, was pinned down by intense enemy mortar, small-arms and automatic-weapons fire. Private Shepard observed an enemy bunker on the left flank and, realizing that it was the principal obstacle to the advance of the platoon, left his position of cover and assaulted it. His single-handed attack took the enemy troops completely by surprise and caused them to concentrate their automatic-weapons fire on him. As Private Shepard neared the bunker, he was instantly killed by a burst of fire from an enemy machine-gun. However, his gallant charge drew the fire from his comrades and gave them time to set up defenses which undoubtedly saved many lives.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 753 (October 9, 1951)
Home Town: Denver, Colorado

*SHERMAN, ALBERT (MIA)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Albert Sherman (US51178169), Private, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as a Medical Aidman with the 15th Infantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division. Private Sherman distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Surang- ni, Korea, on 10 June 1953. On that date, Private Sherman was a Medical Aidman in an area under intense enemy attack. Learning that a listening post had been hit by enemy artillery, Private Sherman unhesitatingly rushed one hundred and fifty yards through heavy artillery, mortar and small arms fire to the position. While administering emergency first aid to a wounded man in the listening post, Private Sherman was seriously injured by a shell burst. Completely disregarding his own wounds, Private Sherman continued to render aid to the casualty and then carried him a bunker on the main line of resistance. Noticing another wounded man nearby; Private Sherman ignored the proximity of the enemy, moved to the side of the casualty, and administered emergency treatment. Private Sherman was killed by enemy infantrymen who attacked him while he was treating his comrade.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 988 (November 3, 1953)
Home Town: Bronx, New York

*SHERWOOD, CHARLES W.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Charles W. Sherwood (RA44137634), Corporal, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company D, 1st Battalion, 23d Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division. Corporal Sherwood distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces at Chipyong-ni, Korea, during the period 13 through 15 February 1951. When his unit was attacked by a large enemy force during the night of 13 February 1951, Corporal Sherwood, although wounded by enemy small-arms fire, remained in his position and inflicted heavy casualties until his machine-gun was knocked out by hostile fire. The enemy closed to within twenty yards, but he coolly held them off with his pistol until another machine-gun could be brought up. A second attempt was made to overrun his position, but Corporal Sherwood, heedless of intense hostile fire, accounted for twenty-six enemy dead before this weapon was also knocked out. On the night of 15 February 1951, a reinforced enemy group made a final attempt to overrun the positions. Corporal Sherwood once more manned his gun and, despite intense hostile mortar, artillery, and small-arms fire, inflicted heavy casualties on the enemy until he was mortally wounded.
Department of the Army: General Orders No. 73 (August 9, 1951)
Home Town: Heard, Georgia

SHILLING, WINFORD A.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Winford A. Shilling, Private First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company K, 3d Battalion, 21st Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division. Private First Class Shilling distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces at Chonji, Korea, on 11 July 1950. On that date, the Command Post of Company K was attacked by heavy enemy machine gun fire. Seeing the danger to the Command Post personnel Private First Class Shilling, without regard for his personal safety, advanced alone to a position within twenty yards of the machine gun nest and destroyed it. A squad of enemy riflemen advanced on Private Shilling's position attempting to dislodge him, but he delivered such a volume of accurate fire that half of the enemy were killed and the rest withdrew. The enemy then brought the Command Post under fire from another machine gun and again Private Shilling attacked with hand grenades, destroying the gun. The extraordinary heroism displayed by Private First Class Shilling reflects the highest credit on himself and the military service.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 54 (September 6, 1950)

SIEGERT, FRANK P.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Frank P. Siegert, Private First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as a Medical Aidman with an Infantry Company. Private First Class Siegert distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Irun-dong, Korea, on 22 June 1952. On that morning the company with which Private Siegert was serving was moving forward in a sweep of enemy-held territory. Suddenly the enemy concentrated an intense mortar bombardment and a deadly volume of small-arms fire on the friendly troops, causing several casualties. With complete disregard for his personal safety, Private Siegert moved tirelessly across the fire-swept terrain, treating the wounded and personally carrying them to positions of safety. Wounded in the arm, face, and legs by flying shrapnel from an exploding mortar round, he ignored the intense pain continued his hazardous mission. On one occasion, he noticed an injured man lying one hundred yards ahead of him in an exposed position. Displaying the utmost courage and determination, Private Siegert advanced in the face of murderous enemy fusillade and began to treat a wounded man. Flung from his patient by a blast form a concussion grenade, he crawled back to the man, finished treating his wounds, and then carried him through the intense hostile fire to safety. When the company withdrew, Private Siegert remained behind, still treating the wounded and carrying them from the field. Only after he was assured that all casualties had been evacuated did he rejoin his unit and allow his wounds to be treated.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 703 (November 15, 1952)

*SIMS, DERWOOD W.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Derwood W. Sims (0-1686690), First Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company F, 2d Battalion, 27th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division. First Lieutenant Sims distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces near Chiktan, Korea, on 15 April 1951. Lieutenant Sims personally assumed command of the assault platoon of his company and led the unit in an attack against a large well-entrenched enemy force occupying fortified positions on mountainous terrain in the vicinity of Chiktan. During the fierce fire-fight that ensued, Lieutenant Sims was seriously wounded by machine-gun fire; however, he continued to lead the attack, exhorting his men to greater effort and shouting words of encouragement to them. During the platter phase of the assault, an enemy grenade burst near Lieutenant Sims' position, mortally wounding him. His display of courage, fearless leadership and selfless devotion to duty so inspired his men that they successfully routed the enemy and secured the company's objective.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 331 (May 23, 1951)
Home Town: Muscogee, Georgia

SITLER, ROSS E.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Ross E. Sitler (0-2014505), First Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as Platoon Leader of Company B, 1st Battalion, 15th Infantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division. First Lieutenant Sitler distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Koyangdae, Korea, on 4 February 1952. On that date Lieutenant Sitler led his men in an assault against a heavily fortified enemy-held hill. As the friendly troops charged up the slope, they were subjected to a heavy volume of small-arms and automatic weapons fire, but they hung tenaciously to the slope and continued to inch their way forward. Finally, an artillery barrage made the hill so untenable that a withdrawal was the only possible maneuver that would save the friendly troops from annihilation. When the platoon was safely ensconced at the base of the hill, Lieutenant Sitler observed that two of his men had been unable to fall back and were still on the fire-swept slope. Without regard for his personal safety, he made two trips through the intense enemy fire and carried the wounded men to cover. Lieutenant Sitler had barely completed this rescue when he was advised that another of his men, who had moved across the slope in an effort to divert the enemy fire, had been wounded. With utter fearlessness, he again raced through the concentrated fire toward the stricken soldier. He continued forward until, wounded in the legs, chest, and arms, he could go no further. Although Lieutenant Sitler was unable to move, he continued to direct his men, who completed the withdrawal without further casualties.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 266 (May 25, 1952)
Home Town: Los Angeles, California

SKELDON, JAMES H.
(First Award)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to James H. Skeldon, Lieutenant Colonel (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as Commanding Officer of the 2d Battalion, 38th Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division. Lieutenant Colonel Skeldon distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces near Taege-ri, Kochang, and Chonju, Korea, during the period 1 September 1950 through 28 September 1950. While commanding his infantry battalion on 1 September 1950, when his unit was engaged in a defense against a major enemy offensive, Lieutenant Colonel Skeldon personally led a force consisting of a rifle platoon and two tanks against a roadblock established by infiltrated enemy troops. When he saw that the platoon was stopped because of heavy enemy automatic-weapons and small-arms fire, he unhesitatingly placed himself at the head of the troops, shouting words of encouragement and directed them to follow him. Noting that the advance that the advance nevertheless continued too slowly and realizing that all might be destroyed unless the enemy was eliminated without delay, he stood up and at the top of his lungs shouted the command, "Charge!" Inspired by such heroic leadership and utter indifference to danger, the platoon charged the enemy and wiped out the roadblock killing 35 and capturing many weapons. On 4 September 1950, he personally directed the rescue of a supporting tank from a muddy rice paddy within close range of the enemy. After seven hours of hazardous rescue work under intense mortar and flat-trajectory fire, he finally succeeded with the aid of three other tanks in saving the tank and preventing it from falling into the hands of the enemy. During the offensive operations of his battalion, which was leading the advance of the regiment after the penetration of the Pusan perimeter, he displayed the same heroism and audacious leadership that had marked his actions in the defensive operations. Having driven the enemy across the Nakton River, he immediately forced the river crossing with his own battalion on 18 September 1950, and aggressively led his troops forward from enemy strongpoint to strongpoint. On 25 September 1950, while driving the enemy back from Hyopchon across the Hwang River to Kochang, he again forged ahead of the lead elements and, by is personal example of valor and daring leadership in the face of the heaviest fire, so inspired his troops that they overran the hostile defensive positions, killing approximately 500 enemy troops and capturing 450 of them on that one day. On 28 September 1950, he and his battalion spearheaded the drive of his regiment, which carried the advancing columns a distance of 73 miles through enemy territory from Kochang to Chongju. He personally led his command over roads that, because of the speed of the advance, had not been searched for mines and through sniper-infested villages and towns, narrowly missing death by enemy fire on several occasions. His gallant and fearless leadership, with total indifference to his own safety, served as a continuous inspiration to all members of his command and was directly responsible for the swift and complete success of the offensive operations.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 90 (February 22, 1951)
Other Award: Distinguished Service Cross w/OLC (Korea)

SKELDON, JAMES H.
(Second Award)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting a Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster in lieu of a Second Award of the Distinguished Service Cross to James H. Skeldon, Lieutenant Colonel (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as Commanding Officer of the 2d Battalion, 38th Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division. Lieutenant Colonel Skeldon distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces near Daechon and Suachon, Korea, on 29 and 30 November 1950. Colonel Skeldon's battalion was under heavy attack and the allied units on his right and left flanks had withdrawn. After committing his reserve company and exploiting all available means to stem the enemy attack, he ordered the withdrawal of his companies to the next ridge. Displaying the highest degree of leadership and with complete disregard for his own safety, he personally controlled this operation from the most advantageous positions, although continuously exposed to enemy fire. Not satisfied that all his men and equipment had been removed, he re-crossed a large open area which was being swept by heavy enemy fire and returned to his old command post where he made a personal reconnaissance of the area. He then moved to a nearby battalion command post and assisted another battalion commander in the withdrawal of his troops and tanks. During this move he was painfully wounded in the left shoulder, but refused evacuation. He soon discovered that elements of the 38th Infantry and allied troops had been surrounded and that the road was jammed with vehicles and that most of the troops and drivers were located in ditch along the road. Taking command of the situation, and under the cover of approaching darkness, he ordered the men to high ground along the south side of the road where he supervised their deployment to assure maximum effectiveness of their firepower. Later, upon regimental orders, he personally led these men from their encirclement to the regimental perimeter. On 30 November 1950, the battalion was ordered to attack and clear a strong enemy roadblock which had halted movement of the Second Division and other allied units. He personally led this attack and continued to expose himself to intense enemy fire so he could best control his battalion, which was encountering stiff and determined resistance. When the 2d Battalion was ordered to break through the roadblock and link up with allied units near Sunchon, he successfully spearheaded a motorized column that fought through the roadblock under intense enemy fire, thus opening the road for succeeding elements of the divisions.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 99 (February 26, 1951)
Other Award: Distinguished Service Cross (Korea)

*SMITH, BOBBY J.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Bobby J. Smith (RA14326593), Corporal, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company E, 2d Battalion, 5th Regimental Combat Team, 1st Cavalry Division. Corporal Smith distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Waegwan, Korea, on 19 September 1950. When his platoon leader, platoon sergeant, and other ranking non-commissioned officers had been wounded, and he himself had been seriously wounded, Corporal Smith tenaciously remained in his position, firing his Browning Automatic Rifle with deadly accuracy against the enemy. When he had expended all his ammunition, he made his way to a machine-gun ammunition bearer in order to obtain more. He noticed that a gunner and assistant gunner of a nearby machine-gun had been wounded and their gun temporarily put out of action. He manned the gun and continued to deliver fire against the enemy until reinforcement arrived. In the ensuing action when, as a result of his heroic achievements, the platoon once more began to advance, he was morally wounded by enemy fire.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 189 (December 5, 1950)
Home Town: Anderson, South Carolina

SMITH, CECIL G.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Cecil G. Smith, First Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while commanding a composite group of personnel from the 1st Battalion, 32d Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division. First Lieutenant Smith distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces between Hagaru-ri and Koto-ri, Korea, on 7 December 1950. Lieutenant Smith was proceeding with elements of the FIRST Marine Division in a motor convoy from Hagaru-ri to Koto-ri when fire from a well-entrenched enemy machine-gun, supporting approximately one hundred infantry troops, isolated a portion of the convoy and began to inflict heavy casualties. A platoon that was ordered to charge the machine-gun position was pinned own by heavy fire. Realizing the impending danger, Lieutenant Smith crossed approximately three hundred yards of open terrain under constant point-blank fire and, employing grenades and rifle fire, destroyed the enemy machine-gun and its crew. Lieutenant Smith's conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity enabled the unit to attack and annihilate the enemy force, precluding further casualties among his men and permitting continuation of orderly withdrawal.
General Headquarters Far East Command: General Orders No. 120 (May 12, 1951)

SMITH, CHARLES B.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Charles B. Smith, Lieutenant Colonel (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with the 1st Battalion, 21st Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division. Lieutenant Colonel Smith distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces near Osan, Korea, on 5 July 1950. Colonel Smith was the Commanding Officer of a task force numbering less than four hundred men, the initial United States force to engage the North Korean Army. Colonel Smith organized a defensive position near Osan and although under attack by overwhelming odds, the Task Force, inspired by his courageous and inspiring leadership, refused to give ground. Enemy tanks overran the position and without regard for his own personal safety, Colonel Smith repeatedly exposed himself to heavy enemy fire, directing the action of his anti-tank guns. The anti-tank guns proved ineffective against the heavy armor, and Colonel Smith personally led close-range attacks on the enemy tanks, which repulsed them for several hours. The enemy completely surrounded the small force and, although ammunition was nearly exhausted, Colonel Smith personally led the remaining members of the Task Force in a fight out of the trap. By his courage and aggressive leadership he was able to delay a numerically superior enemy force, inflict heavy casualties and extricate his encircled unit.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 76 (September 20, 1950)

SMITH, DALE M.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Dale M. Smith, First Lieutenant (Field Artillery), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Battery B, 57th Field Artillery Battalion, 7th Infantry Division. First Lieutenant Smith distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces near Hagaru-ri, North Korea, on 5 December 1950. Proceeding south to Koto-ri, the leading elements of the battalion came under intense small arms and automatic weapons fire from commanding terrain, bitterly defended by a well-fortified hostile force, hating the advance. Lieutenant Smith's platoon, committed to attack and seize the strategic key terrain, closed with the enemy and, in the bitter fighting that ensued, was pinned down by withering fire. Deploying other members of the platoon in strategic positions, Lieutenant Smith led four men with carbines and grenades in a daring frontal assault against the enemy position and, firing carbines and throwing grenades with deadly accuracy, the valiant group routed the enemy from the strongpoint. Lieutenant Smith's inspirational leadership and intrepid actions resulted in the capture of approximately one hundred and fifty prisoners, numerous wounded, and enabled the battalion to continue its march.
General Headquarters Far East Command: General Orders No. 211 (August 15, 1951)

SMITH, JAMES C.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to James C. Smith (RA34479060), Master Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company G, 2d Battalion, 35th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division. Master Sergeant Smith distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces near Kuhre-ni, Korea, on 11 September 1950. On that date, Master Sergeant Smith had his platoon in a defensive position on high ground overlooking the Nam River when they were attacked by a numerically superior enemy force. For approximately five hours the platoon held the position in spite of repeated fanatical enemy "banzai" charges. Although wounded twice, Sergeant Smith remained with his men directing their fire and encouraging them to held the position. When the position became untenable and the platoon was ordered to withdraw, Sergeant Smith voluntarily remained to cover the withdrawal. He fought so stubbornly and courageously that he was still holding the enemy at bay when the position was retaken by friendly forces.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 114 (March 4, 1951), as amended by General Orders No. 335 (May 24, 1951)
Home Town: Smith, Mississippi

*SMITH, JAMES E.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to James E. Smith (US52054480), Corporal, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company C, 1st Battalion, 23d Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division. Corporal Smith distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces near Pia-ri, Korea, on 17 September 1951. Manning defensive positions in the rugged terrain on Heartbreak Ridge, Corporal Smith's platoon had repulsed numerous fanatical attacks. At approximately 2200 hours, wave after wave of wildly screaming hostile troops swarmed up the slope in a rampant suicidal charge and, despite staggering losses, pressed the assault with ruthless determination. The battle increased in tempo and fury and, with ammunition in critical supply, the defenders were forced to withdraw. Voluntarily remaining to cover the retrograde movement, Corporal Smith poured crippling fire into the ranks of the advancing foe until his ammunition was expended and then, using his bayonet and finally his bare fists, he fought with unflinching courage until he was mortally wounded. His valorous conduct and intrepid actions stemmed the onslaught, enabled his comrades to effect an orderly withdrawal and, when the strongpoint was regained, more than thirty-five enemy dead were found lying in the wake of his action.
General Headquarters Far East Command: General Orders No. 226 (August 25, 1953)
Home Town: Licking, Ohio

*SMITH, JAMES LEE
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to James Lee Smith (RA15280680), Private, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company E, 2d Battalion, 35th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division. Private Smith distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces near Kuhe-ri, Korea, on 25 August 1950. On that date, Private Smith was a member of a force covering a patrol which crossed the Nam River. As the first boat of the patrol reached the opposite shore and the occupants debarked, they were subjected to intense hostile small-arms fire from three sides at a range of three hundred yards. Observing that the position of the patrol was untenable, the company commander ordered an immediate withdrawal. As the order was given, the patrol leader was killed, six members were wounded, and the assault boat was cast adrift. Private Smith, heedless of the deadly concentrations of hostile fire, plunged into the swift current and swam sixty yards through withering fire, retrieved the boat and brought it and the six wounded men to shore on the friendly side of the river. Private Smith's conspicuous heroism, selfless regard for the welfare of his comrades, and his outstanding devotion to duty in saving the lives of six wounded men exemplify the highest ideals of the American soldier.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 89 (October 1, 1950)
Home Town: Clermont, Ohio

SMITH, JOSEPH E.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Joseph E. Smith, Private First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company B, 1st Battalion, 31st Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division. Private First Class Smith distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Sokkogae, Korea, on 16 April 1953. On that date, Private Smith, was on a listening post forward of the main line of resistance on his first day in combat when an enemy force launched an assault. When he was ordered to withdraw to a more tenable position, Private Smith, experiencing his first day in combat, moved back and voluntarily manned a light machine-gun. Under a heavy barrage of artillery, mortar, and small arms fire, Private Smith laid down a withering hail of fire, annihilating at least eight of the enemy who stormed his position. Seeing that the hostile forces had gained the high ground inside the trench line, he moved from his position, throwing hand grenades up-slope and firing his weapon, and on several occasions moved into close hand-to-hand combat with the enemy. He fought constantly and with vigor until his ammunition was expended. Then, with two comrades, Private Smith rolled about fifteen yards down-slope and remained perfectly still for a period of more than four hours while hostile troops moved through the position, at one time stumbling over them, mistaking them for dead. When the allied counterattack commenced, Private Smith joined in the attack and again fought courageously until the position was reoccupied and secured.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 605 (June 27, 1953)

SMITH, NICHOLAS, JR.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Nicholas Smith, Jr. (RA33753369), Sergeant First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Headquarters Company, 2d Battalion, 24th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division. Sergeant First Class Smith distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Kunuri, Korea, on 25 November 1950. On that date, Sergeant First Class Smith and a small group of men were defending a hill vital to the battalion defense and to the protection of the Battalion Command Post. When a numerically superior enemy force launched a fanatical bayonet assault against the hill in an effort to overrun the command post area, Sergeant Smith directed the men with him to fall back and establish a new defense line while he remained on the hill to furnish covering fire for the operation. Choosing an exposed position that offered a clear field of fire on the advancing enemy, he placed such accurate fire on the hostile force that seventeen were killed and the remainder forced to withdraw. The extraordinary heroism displayed by Sergeant First Class Smith in steadfastly holding his position in the face of such overwhelming odds prevented the command post from being overrun.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 602 (August 1, 1951)
Home Town: Los Angeles, California

*SMITH, REGINALD D.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Reginald D. Smith (US55024532), Private First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company K, 3d Battalion, 8th Cavalry Regiment (Infantry), 1st Cavalry Division. Private First Class Smith distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces at Onnamu-go, Korea, on 8 October 1951. When his platoon came under withering cross-fire from strongly fortified positions, Private Smith moved boldly forward, hurled grenades into an enemy emplacement, and wiped out a machine-gun crew, thereby enabling his unit to move forward. While nearing a second bunker, the valiant group was pinned down by intense enemy fire. Private Smith crept up the fire-swept hill, lobbed two grenades with deadly accuracy, and poured rifle fire into the position, killing all occupants. Although painfully wounded by a mortar burst, he continued forward until hostile fire reached such intensity that his until was ordered to move back. He voluntarily remained in position, covering the retrograde movement. As he withdrew, he observed his platoon leader wounded and unable to move. He promptly administered first aid and began the slow, tortuous evacuation, crawling toward friendly liens. During this action, both men were mortally wounded by mortar fire.
Department of the Army: General Orders No. 106 (November 28, 1952)
Home Town: Kent, Michigan

SMITH, WAYNE C.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Wayne C. Smith, Major General, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as Commanding General of the 7th Infantry Division. Major General Smith distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Kumhwa, Korea, during the period 14 through 17 October 1952. When the Seventh Infantry Division was committed to wrest the strongly defended Hill 598 from a numerically superior hostile force, General Smith assumed the position at an extremely vulnerable observation post in order to closely direct the attack upon the enemy, and remained at this vantage point throughout the first morning's operations despite dangerously accurate shelling of the area by Communist forces. Realizing that the assault echelons were halted short of their objective by devastating fires, heavy casualties, and adverse terrain, he immediately left the comparative safety of the observation post to personally reorganize his command for renewed attack and instill in the troops the will to win. Exposing himself to intense hostile fire, he traveled throughout the battle area, sharing the hazards and discomforts of his men, encouraging them to maximum effort, and supervising critical supply and evaluation activities. As a result of his presence in forward areas and sincere concern for the welfare of his troops, morale surged upward, enemy defenses were overrun, and highly strategic terrain was secured by the Seventh Infantry Division. Throughout the remainder of the action, he was constantly in the danger area, employing sound military tactics and forceful leadership to inspire his men to successfully repulse large-scale enemy counteroffensives, enable rapid relief of combat-weary battalions, and insure expeditious organization and consolidating of the newly-adjusted main line of resistance. Dominating and controlling the vital situation through sheer force of his heroic example, General Smith's valorous conduct and demonstrated courage under fire contributed significantly to the United Nations' first armed bid for world peace.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 57 (February 25, 1955)

*SMITH, WILLIAM L.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to William L. Smith (NG24534226), Sergeant First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company G, 2d Battalion, 27th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division. Sergeant First Class Smith distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces at Kumhwa, Korea, on 4 November 1951. In an attack on a strongly held hostile position, Sergeant Smith commanded the assault squad of his platoon. As the squad approached the main enemy position, heavy small-arms and grenade fire inflicted serious casualties. Although wounded twice, he continued to lead his unit and directed the attack against the enemy bunkers that were the principal obstacles to the progress of his unit. By almost superhuman effort and despite his wounds, this intrepid leader personally inflicted heavy casualties upon the enemy and continued to lead the advance until he was killed by an exploding grenade.
Department of the Army: General Orders No. 64 (June 30, 1952)
Home Town: Baldwin, Alabama

*SMOCK, RICHARD T.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Richard T. Smock (0-59500), First Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company I, 3d Battalion, 31st Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division. First Lieutenant Smock distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Chollyon-Dong, Korea, on 6 June 1951. On that date, Lieutenant Smock was directing his company in an effort to consolidate friendly defensive positions in an area just captured from the enemy when the hostile troops launched a fierce counterattack. Still holding its positions, the company was hard-pressed but, under the inspiring leadership of Lieutenant Smock, the men refused to give ground. As the battle raged, Lieutenant Smock observed that the friendly troops holding the left flank of Company I's position were threatening to become disorganized under the pressure of repeated assaults by the numerically superior enemy. Realizing that an enemy breakthrough was imminent unless immediate action was taken, he rushed to that sector, shouting words of encouragement to the troops and attempting to reorganize them. Observing an enemy machine-gun emplacement that had been overlooked in the previous attack, Lieutenant Sock neutralized it with a grenade and called to the friendly troops to set up a machine-gun in the position. Because of the language barrier that existed, many of Lieutenant, Smock's commands were being misinterpreted, so he set about to illustrate them by personal example. Standing exposed to the intense enemy fire, he killed and wounded seven of the on-rushing enemy with his carbine. Inspired by his fearlessness, the friendly troops regrouped and successfully defended their positions. Lieutenant Smock continued to direct and encourage them until he was mortally wounded by hostile fire.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 878 (November 12, 1951)
Home Town: Geary, Kansas

*SMYTH, WILLIAM R.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to William R. Smyth (RA12025327), Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company E, 2d Battalion, 160th Infantry Regiment, 40th Infantry Division. Sergeant Smyth distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces at Mundung-ni, Korea, on 3 November 1952. On that date Company E, occupying defensive positions on key terrain, came under an attack, the brunt of which was directed against the 2d platoon. Enemy troops swarmed up a finger approach to the hill and, despite staggering losses, pressed the assault with determination, infiltrating friendly positions and destroying the machine-gun bunker which had provided protective fire for the sector. Surging forward, they penetrated the friendly lines at several points. Sergeant Smyth left his covered position, raced through the fire-swept impact area, and urged his comrades to follow in an effort to contain the breakthrough. Moving directly into enemy fire, he was heard over the din of battle shouting words of encouragement. Firing his carbine and throwing grenades with deadly accuracy, he killed seven hostile soldiers and wounded many others. He dominated the critical situation through sheer force of his heroic example and continued to lead the daring charge until mortally wounded by mortar fire. Inspired by the challenge of their valiant leader, the men fought with great courage and skill, repulsing the attack and thwarting the enemy attempt to exploit the breech and overrun friendly positions.
Department of the Army: General Orders No. 72 (September 23, 1953)
Home Town: Onondaga, New York

SNOWDEN, HOUSTON D.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Houston D. Snowden, Corporal, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as a Medical Aidman with the 9th Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division. Corporal Snowden distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Chigu-ri, Korea, on 7 March 1951. On that date, his company was making its way over mountainous terrain in an attempt to contact the enemy. As the company was making its way over the mountains, an enemy mortar barrage pinned down the leading platoon, inflicting heavy casualties. Without hesitation, Sergeant Snowden made his way through the enemy fire to reach his wounded comrades. While administering first aid, he was painfully wounded by mortar fragments but continued to treat the wounded. When the enemy barrage lifted, Sergeant Snowden observed three wounded riflemen whom he had not notice before and was moving forward to assist them when the concealed enemy opened fire on him with small arms and automatic weapons. Heedless of the hostile fire, he continued on to the wounded men and was administering aid when the enemy again delivered a barrage of mortar fire on the friendly positions. Shouting a warning to other members of the platoon, Sergeant Snowden flung his body over the man he was bandaging. As he was shielding his wounded comrade and enemy mortar burst nearby and he was wounded for the second time. Although bleeding profusely, he continued to administer to the wounded. When he ascertained that his wounded comrades had been properly cared for and safely evacuated, he proceeded to the aid station, where his own wounds were treated. Then, although weakened from loss of blood, Sergeant Snowden returned to the company and continued on the mission.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 526 (July 8, 1951)

*SOMMER, HUGH N., JR.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Hugh N. Sommer, Jr. (ER16234052), Private, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company E, 2d Battalion, 5th Regimental Combat Team, 1st Cavalry Division. Private Sommer distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces at Yonghwa- dong, Korea, on 22 April 1951. On that date, Private Sommer's platoon was attacked by a numerically superior foe supported by intense artillery, mortar, and small-arms fire. After bitter fighting, the platoon was ordered to withdraw to a more tenable position and Private Sommer's squad remained to cover the retrograde movement. Later, while attempting to withdraw through positions previously held by another unit, an enemy soldier silhouetted on a ridgeline was mistaken for a friendly soldier. Calling out that he was bringing his squad through, Private Sommer received an affirmative answer in English. As the squad approached, the enemy soldier tossed grenades, and although the squad opened fire, the enemy soldier succeeded in rolling grenades into their midst before he was eliminated. While attempting to dispose of a grenade in the position during this action, Private Sommer lost his life and his comrades were wounded. However, his courageous and inspirational leadership greatly encouraged the remaining members of his unit and they successfully evaded enemy forces and rejoined friendly elements participating in a counterattack the following day.
Department of the Army: General Orders No. 18 (February 18, 1953)
Home Town: St. Louis, Missouri

SOSA, ROBERTO
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Roberto Sosa (RA17289176), Corporal, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company B, 1st Battalion, 38th Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division. Corporal Sosa distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Taeu-san, Korea, on 28 July 1951. As his company was advancing in an attack, the platoon to which Corporal Sosa was attached suffered heavy casualties and faltered. Corporal Sosa rushed to the head of the unit, rallied the men, and led them in a renewed assault. He personally destroyed three enemy bunkers with grenades, killing the remaining defenders with his carbine. Although wounded during the advance, he continued forward. Spotting two fleeing enemy soldiers, he killed one with his carbine and the other in hand-to-hand combat. Despite his wound, Corporal Sosa remained until the objective was secured, there by setting an example to all by his inspirational conduct and unflinching courage.
Department of the Army: General Orders No. 12 (January 22, 1953)
Home Town: Stanton, Kansas

SOULE, ROBERT H.
(Second Award)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting a Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster in lieu of a Second Award of the Distinguished Service Cross to Robert H. Soule, Major General, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as Commanding General of the 3d Infantry Division. Major General Soule distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of the Changjin (Chosin) Reservoir in North Korea, during the period 1 through 24 December 1950. Assigned the mission of covering the withdrawal of those elements of the X Corps in the Chosin Reservoir and Hagaru-ri areas, General Soule displayed sound judgment, high professional skill and untiring energy in directing the operations of his division. Although faced with a numerically superior force, freezing temperatures, and an aggressive foe, General Soule's actions enabled the successful withdrawal of the entire FIRST Marine Division and elements of the Seventh Infantry Division. Subsequently, General Soule continued his covering mission so successfully that the enemy was continuously beaten back from the beachhead allowing a complete and orderly withdrawal of all units of X Corps from the Hungnam area with a minimum loss of personnel and equipment. His continued presence at the front under bitter conditions with total disregard for his personal safety and under small arms and automatic weapons fire, was an inspiration to his men during this historic operation.
Headquarters, X Corps: General Orders No. 72 (December 24, 1950)
Other Award: Distinguished Service Cross (WWII)

SPEAR, PAUL R.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Paul R. Spear (RA13319043), Private, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company K, 3d Battalion, 21st Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division. Private Spear distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces at Chonji, Korea, on 11 July 1950. On that date the 2d platoon of Company K was in a defensive position near the Company Command Post when a sudden burst of enemy machine-gun fire struck the Command Post. Private Spear located the machine-gun nest and, although armed only with a pistol, charged the enemy alone, firing his pistol. Even after expending all his ammunition, Private Spear continued his charge and closed with the enemy, using his empty pistol as a club. He had routed the enemy in the machine-gun nest when he was struck by fire from another gun and was seriously wounded.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 55 (September 7, 1950)
Home Town: Norfolk, Virginia

SPICER, WILLIAM H.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to William H. Spicer, Colonel (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with the United States Military Advisory Group, Korea, deployed as Senior Advisor to the 9th Republic of Korea Infantry Division. Colonel Spicer distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Chorwon, Korea, on 10 October 1952. On that date, a vastly superior and fanatically hostile force had launched a series of violent attacks against the Ninth ROK Division with the intention of capturing hill 395 (White Horse Mountain), a key terrain feature dominating the Chorwon Valley. As senior advisor to the commanding general of the Ninth ROK Division, Colonel Spicer moved to the battle area to better evaluate the situation and to observe the counterattack being launched and joined the assaulting friendly forces to better observe the progress of the attack. Shortly thereafter he found that the numerically superior foe supported by massive artillery and mortar fire was causing the friendly forces to falter and stop short of their objective. Colonel Spicer, through his presence at the critical point in the battle, quickly sensed the need for aggressive leadership, which he immediately provided. By calmly disregarding his personal safety and moving freely among the soldiers in defiance of the heavy and accurate enemy fire, he rallied the weakened friendly forces and organized a new assault which drove through the enemy position, inflicting heavy casualties and capturing the objective. Continuing to expose himself to the heavy enemy fire, Colonel Spicer carefully and methodically directed the establishment of the new defensive positions and supervised the establishment of strong outposts, leaving the battle area only after he was sure that the friendly troops were thoroughly dug- in and prepared to withstand enemy counterattacks.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 802 (December 27, 1952)

SPRINGSTON, REX B.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Rex B. Springston, Master Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company K, 3d Battalion, 180th Infantry Regiment, 45th Infantry Division. Master Sergeant Springston distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces at Tumyong-dong, Korea, on 13 June 1951. Committed to secure the right finger of a strategic hill, Sergeant Springson's platoon was subjected to intense mortar and artillery fire. When the bombardment lifted, grenade, machine-gun and small-arms fire rained down from well-fortified positions emplaced in the rugged terrain, causing the troops to falter. Rallying his comrades, Sergeant Springston boldly rushed up the hill, firing his carbine with deadly accuracy. When enemy fire threatened to halt the advance, he made a daring charge, wiping out the position and killing its four defenders. Although sustaining a severe wound in this encounter, Sergeant Springston continued his assault. He jumped into a trench, killed three enemy soldiers with grenades, and dispersed the remaining enemy soldiers. Pursuing the foe, he and his men succeeded in inflicting numerous casualties. After accomplishing the company's mission, he launched a determined assault against a reinforced enemy squad, overrunning hostile positions and capturing the battalion's objective.
Department of the Army: General Orders No. 18 (February 18, 1953)

ST. CLAIR, CHARLEY L.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Charley L. St. Clair (0-1889151), First Lieutenant (Field Artillery), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with an Artillery Battery of the 955th Field Artillery Battalion, 8th U.S. Army. First Lieutenant St. Clair distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Kumhwa, Korea, on the night of 13 July 1953. On that date, Lieutenant St. Clair was serving in an artillery observation post which was subjected to an intense enemy attack. After the hostile forces invaded the trenches in front of his position, Lieutenant St. Clair called for artillery on his own position. With two comrades he then took cover in a nearby bunker. When the enemy began to direct small arms fire and grenades into the bunker, he immediately destroyed the communications equipment and maps and ordered his men to withdraw down the hill. Noticing that one of the men was without his armored vest, Lieutenant St. Clair ordered him to take his. While withdrawing through the combined concentration of artillery fire, Lieutenant St. Clair became separated from his comrades and was surrounded by the enemy. He succeeded in escaping them and remained behind enemy lines for seven days, noting enemy dispositions, while attempting to return to United Nations lines. During this time Lieutenant St. Clair, although ill from an extremely painful hip wound, went without food or sufficient water. On the seventh day he succeeded in reaching safety by swimming a river.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 898 (October 1, 1953)
Home Town: Maricopa, Arizona

STACY, JAMES E.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to James E. Stacy, Major (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as Executive Officer, 3d Battalion, 23d Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division. Major Stacy distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Chaun-ni, Korea, on 18 May 1951. On that date, Major Stacy's command post was surrounded by an overwhelming enemy force that had infiltrated friendly lines and established a road block to the rear of the battalion. Realizing that the encircled command post was in imminent danger of being overrun, Major Stacy organized a small group of men and attempted to save the battalion vehicles and equipment by running the roadblock. As the column approached the roadblock, the two lead tanks were knocked out and the advance halted. When it became apparent that the vehicles could not get past the roadblock, he ordered his group to abandon the vehicles and make their way to friendly lines. Loading wounded men who were unable to walk into a vehicle, he personally drove the vehicle cross-country through withering enemy fire in order to reach friendly lines with the casualties. Upon reaching friendly lines, he notified the supporting artillery of the location of the 3d Battalion and its proposed route of escape to prevent the artillery from firing on the friendly force.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 417 (June 9, 1951)

*STAI, MELVIN RUBEN (POW)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Melvin Ruben Stai (0-2035983), Captain (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with as Commanding Officer of Company A, 1st Battalion, 23d Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division. Captain Stai distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces near Kunu-ri, Korea, on 30 November 1950. While the 1st Battalion was fighting a delaying action south of Kunu-ri, Captain Stai's company was in reserve position at the base of a hill. When the enemy infiltrated and seized the hill, he was ordered to launch a counterattack to retake it. In the face of extremely heavy automatic-weapons fire, he started his advance up the hill and was almost immediately halted by the overwhelming enemy fire. During this halt, he continuously exposed himself to withering enemy fire in order to coordinate and direct the fire of his company. Despite the urging of platoon and squad leaders, the men of Company A were not able to advance in the face of increasingly heavy enemy fire. Captain Stai, resuming the advance alone, had gone about fifty yards up the hill when the men of Company A, inspired by his courageous action, rallied behind him and began pressing the attack. This attack once renewed, succeeded in driving the enemy from the strategic position, killing approximately fifty and routing the remainder. After being driven from the hilltop, the enemy laid down a heavy concentration of direct mortar and machine-gun fire on their deserted position, but in spite of his heavy fire, Captain Stai, although he could be clearly seen by the enemy, remained in the open and placed each man of his command in position to fire upon the retreating enemy. After securing the hill, he held the position throughout the day, and thereby contributed greatly to the successful withdrawal of the remainder of the regiment.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 90 (February 22, 1951)
Home Town: Spokane, Washington

STANLEY, COURTNEY L.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Courtney L. Stanley, Private, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company I, 3d Battalion, 9th Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division. Private Stanley distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Um-Dong, Korea, on 17 March 1953. On that date, Private Stanley's position came under intense attack by hostile forces. After a fierce hand-to-hand battle, the enemy succeeded in penetrating the defense and overran the position. During this action Private Stanley discovered a battalion commander lying in a trench, severely wounded. Disregarding all thoughts of personal safety, Private Stanley carried the wounded officer across fire-swept terrain to a bunker where he found a medical aidman attending another casualty. Leaving the wounded officer to the care of the aidman, Private Stanley then took up an exposed position at the doorway of the bunker to prevent the entry of enemy soldiers. When he heard several of enemy troops talking a short distance away, Private Stanley, fearing they were plotting an attack over the roof of the bunker, charged the group with grenades and annihilated them. He then returned to his position at the entrance of the bunker and, oblivious to the close proximity of exploding mortar and artillery rounds, succeeded in repulsing another hostile assault. Observing two more wounded comrades lying to the front of the bunker, Private Stanley moved across the open terrain and brought them to safety. During the next three hours Private Stanley remained exposed to the intense enemy fire, guarding the entrance to the bunker against seven enemy assaults. When reinforcements arrived, the wounded men were safely evacuated. Although he had been slightly wounded himself, Private Stanley remained on the position until the enemy forces had been repulsed.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 508 (May 24, 1953)

*STARKEY, JACK R.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Jack R. Starkey (RA13268458), Corporal, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company F, 2d Battalion, 5th Regimental Combat Team, 1st Cavalry Division. Corporal Starkey distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Sahnglung-ni, Korea, on 7 and 8 August 1950. For a period of about thirty hours, while his unit was defending vital high ground, Corporal Starkey constantly and without regard for his own personal safety exposed himself to enemy fire to render first aid and to evacuate wounded personnel to places of safety. On the return trips he brought up as much ammunition and water as he could carry. On 8 August 1950 Corporal Starkey distinguished himself by guiding under heavy fire a party of United States Marines into his platoon's forward positions where they were able to assist in repelling a particularly vicious attack. When another group of Marines were pinned down by an enemy machine-gun, he courageously stood up and threw a grenade that destroyed the enemy machine-gun. In the ensuing action he was mortally wounded.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 20 (January 13, 1951)
Home Town: Allegheny, Pennsylvania

STEPHENS, RICHARD W.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Richard W. Stephens, Colonel (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as Commanding Officer, 21st Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division. Colonel Stephens distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces near Chochiwon, Korea, during the period from 9 through 13 July 1950. During the early stages of the Korean conflict, Colonel Stephens was assigned the mission of delaying the advance of the North Korean People's Army pending the buildup of United Nations forces for a counteroffensive. Making a personal reconnaissance of the area, he chose a delaying site in the hills north of Chochiwon where he personally directed the construction of defensive positions and emplacement of automatic weapons, mortars and supporting artillery. When the enemy assault on the delaying position began, he, seemingly oblivious of the intense enemy fire, moved forward of the regiment's main line of resistance and established an observation post from which he directed the defense of his regiment's positions. When the observation post was encircled by the enemy, he organized a few men into a combat group and personally led them in an audacious attack on an enemy of overwhelming strength, successfully breaking out of the encirclement and reaching friendly lines. During the entire engagement, he exploited every possible means of stemming the enemy advance and his courage, fearless bearing, and aggressive leadership were largely responsible for the magnificent delaying action fought by his hopelessly outnumbered troops.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 114 (March 4, 1951), as amended by General Orders No. 189 (1951)

STEWART, HARRY L.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Harry L. Stewart, Corporal, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as the leader of a mortar squad. Corporal Stewart distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Wonju, Korea, on 14 February 1951. Corporal Steward was participating in a counterattack on a critically important hill defended by a numerically superior enemy force. In the initial phase of the attack, Corporal Stewart placed effective fire on the enemy position while manning a light machine-gun. Upon hearing the platoon leader order a rifleman to take the point in the attack, Corporal Stewart exchanged the weapon for a rifle and assumed the lead. As the company reached the summit of the hill, it was subjected to devastating machine-gun and grenade fire which inflicted heavy casualties. Realizing that the situation had reached a critical stage, Corporal Stewart again took the light machine-gun and advanced boldly up the hill directly into the enemy fire, firing the weapon from the hip. By skilful maneuvering, Corporal Stewart neutralized the machine-gun position, which provided the enemy's best defense, and so demoralized the hostile troops that they fled down the reverse slope of the hill in disorder. Inspired by Corporal Stewart's courageous charge, the other members of the company vigorously attacked the remaining enemy positions and recaptured the strategic hill.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 575 (June 16, 1953)

*STEWART, WALTER LEE
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Walter Lee Stewart (US54051973), Corporal, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company F, 2d Battalion, 32d Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division. Corporal Stewart distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Pyongony, Korea, in the early morning hours of 12 June 1952. On that date, Corporal Stewart's platoon was moving up the slope of a strategically located hill held by a strongly entrenched hostile force. As the platoon reached the crest of the hill, it was suddenly exposed to a vicious fusillade of small-arms and automatic weapons fire which inflicted several casualties and halted the friendly advance. Realizing that his comrades would be annihilated if they remained pinned down in their present exposed positions, Corporal Stewart leaped to his feet and charged directly into the murderous fire. Inspired by his courageous example, his comrades followed him as he moved rapidly along a hostile trench throwing grenades and firing his rifle with deadly accuracy. A sudden burst of automatic weapons fire hit him in the chest, but he refused to be evacuated or given emergency treatment. Instead, ignoring the pain of his wounds, he continued to advance, inflicting heavy casualties on the foe. He was still leading his platoon's charge when a bursting mortar round killed him.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 594 (October 2, 1952)
Home Town: Natchitoches, Louisiana

*STOVER, MAX RAYMOND
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Max Raymond Stover (0-975672), First Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as a Platoon Leader with Company C, 1st Battalion, 31st Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division. First Lieutenant Stover distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Kumhwa, Korea, on 16 October 1952. On that date, the company led by Lieutenant Stover, weakened and exhausted after two days of continuous fighting, was ordered to seize a tactically important part of a commanding terrain feature. Remaining always with the foremost element of the assault platoon, Lieutenant Stover guided his men up the battle-torn slope which let to their objective. When another company became pinned down by heavy small arms, automatic weapons, artillery, and mortar fire, Lieutenant Stover shouted to his men to follow him and led them through the pinned-down company and on toward the enemy positions. Without warning, a concealed machine-gun opened fire on the company inflicting heavy casualties and threatening to halt its advance. Exhibiting a complete disregard for his personal safety, Lieutenant Stover charged forward alone to a point near the emplacement and hurled a grenade into the position, destroying it. Mortally wounded, he nevertheless inspired his men to continue their advance and to overrun and secure the objective.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 138 (January 23, 1953)
Home Town: Pinellas, Florida

STRATTON, CHARLES W.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Charles W. Stratton, Lieutenant Colonel (Field Artillery), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as Provisional Commander of the 13th Field Artillery Battalion, the 52nd Field Artillery Battalion, and elements of the 11th Field Artillery Battalion, 24th Infantry Division Artillery. Lieutenant Colonel Stratton distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces along the Kum River north of Taejon, Korea, on 16 July 1950. While at the command post of the 19th Infantry Regiment, Colonel Stratton received a message from the commanding officer of the 52nd Field Artillery Battalion that their positions were surrounded by enemy infantry. Colonel Stratton left the regimental command post immediately to effect relief and withdrawal of the artillery units which were surrounded. Commanding a tank, Colonel Stratton worked his way through to the forward position area of Battery A, 52nd Field Artillery Battalion, which he found well organized, and effectively beating off the enemy attack with artillery and small-arms fire. He then proceeded to the position area of Battery B, where he attempted to clear fire blocks which prevented withdrawal of the battery. During this action his tank was knocked out by enemy fire, killing the tank driver and seriously wounding the tank commander. Colonel Stratton dismounted form the knocked-out tank and proceeded on foot. Upon arrival at the B Battery area, he took personal command of the area, since the battery commander had been killed by enemy fire. He fearlessly directed the howitzers in direct fire against enemy infantry and three enemy fire blocks of an estimated two machine-guns each. The battery at this time was under intense enemy mortar, automatic weapons and rifle fire. Colonel Stratton remained in the area for six hours fighting off infiltrating enemy infantry and attempting to reduce enemy fire blocks in order to effectively withdraw friendly infantry and artillery units. Later, taking complete command and effecting complete coordination, Colonel Stratton organized the remaining personnel of the 19th Infantry Regiment and the 52nd Field Artillery Battalion in this area and led them in fighting through enemy installations and through the hills to friendly forces. By these actions Colonel Stratton saved numerous lives.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 169 (November 13, 1950)

*STRICKLER, PAUL C.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Paul C. Strickler (RA19374994), Private First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company G, 2d Battalion, 27th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division. Private First Class Strickler distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces near Yongdong-po, Korea, on 6 February 1951. At approximately 1330 hours on that date, a numerically superior enemy force launched a strong counterattack against positions which had been taken by Company G, and the unit was ordered to withdraw. Aware that covering fire was needed to protect his comrades, Private Strickler gallantry remained in position as the company withdrew and single-handedly delivered accurate and effective fire on the advancing enemy troops until he was killed in close combat.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 363 (May 28, 1951)
Home Town: Sanpete, Utah

STROWMATT, FRANCIS D.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Francis D. Strowmatt, Sergeant First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Infantry Company. Sergeant First Class Strowmatt distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Sanjan, Korea, on the morning of 6 February 1952. On that date, Sergeant Strowmatt was a member of a patrol engaged in assaulting a key ridge held by a well-entrenched enemy force. As the patrol approached its objective, it was suddenly exposed to a vicious fusillade of hostile small-arms, automatic- weapons, and mortar fire which halted its advance. Standing erect in full view of the enemy, Sergeant Strowmatt located a protected route to the enemy positions and led his men forward until they were close to their objective. Then, ordering his men to disperse, he crawled forward until he was ten yards from the foe. With the hostile now concentrating its entire firepower on him, he rapidly threw a series of grenades, which inflicted heavy casualties on the enemy troops. When his grenades were exhausted, and with the foe still offering fanatical resistance, he ordered his men to throw him their grenades and to move back while he covered their withdrawal. Remaining alone at this hazardous post, Sergeant Strowmatt continued to throw grenades into the enemy trenches while his men moved to safety. With his grenades expended, he threw a charge of TNT into the hostile fortifications. The resulting explosion caused so much confusion that Sergeant Strowmatt was able to leave his exposed position and rejoin his men.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 560 (September 19, 1952)

STUART, BOBBY G.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Bobby G. Stuart (RA17273515), Corporal, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company A, 1st Battalion, 19th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division. Corporal Stuart distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces near Sesim-ni, Korea, on 4 February 1951. After successfully defending the withdrawal of a friendly unit, Corporal Stuart's company was subjected to a series of attacks by a numerically superior enemy force. When a machine-gunner was wounded during a fierce enemy attack, Corporal Stuart immediately took a position behind the weapon and delivered a devastating volume of fire on the attacking troops until the order was given to withdraw. Picking up the machine-gun, Corporal Stuart continued firing it as he slowly withdrew, providing effective cover for the company. After reorganizing, the company launched a counterattack against the enemy, and Corporal Stuart, again carrying and firing the machine-gun, was instrumental in making the attack a success. Upon reading the objective, he proceeded to an exposed position, set up the weapon, and inflicted heavy casualties on the enemy with his deadly accurate fire. After repelling two enemy attempts to retake the position, he was wounded by mortar fire but refused to leave his position until another gunner came.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 365 (May 28, 1951)
Home Town: Sullivan, Missouri

SULLIVAN, RAPHAEL J.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Raphael J. Sullivan, Private First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with an Infantry Company of the 45th Infantry Division. Private First Class Sullivan distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Tumyong-dong, Korea, on the morning of 14 June 1952. On that date, Private Sullivan volunteered to neutralize a group of fanatical enemy troops who had inflicted heavy casualties on a friendly force. Deeply entrenched in six caves, the foe was pouring forth a murderous volume of small-arms and machine-gun fire, and constituted a serious threat to the security of the friendly lines. With complete disregard for his personal safety, Private Sullivan moved through the deadly hostile fire to the caves. While the enemy concentrated a fusillade of automatic-weapons fire upon him and sent forth a shower of grenades, he entered the first cave and successfully placed an explosive charge which destroyed the hostile troops inside. With the utmost coolness in the face of extreme danger, he then proceeded to the second cave and, despite the heavy close-range fire, placed another charge of explosives. On entering the third cave he was painfully wounded in the face, but nevertheless continued his exceedingly hazardous mission, returning to his unit only after he had entered and placed a destructive charge in each of the six caves. His exceptionally courageous actions resulted in the death of approximately twenty-eight enemy troops and enabled his company to secure a hill of great strategic importance.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 587 (September 29, 1952)

*SVEHLA, HENRY
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Henry Svehla (RA21748254), Private First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company F, 2d Battalion, 32d Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division. Private First Class Svehla distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces at Pyongony, Korea, on 12 June 1952. Committed to determine enemy strength and capabilities on key terrain, Private Svehla's platoon forged up the rocky slope. Coming under heavy automatic-weapons and small-arms fire, the troops began to falter. Realizing the success of the mission was imperiled, Private Svehla charge forward, firing his weapon and throwing grenades. The men, rallying to the challenge, joined in the assault against a numerically superior foe and inflicted numerous casualties. Although wounded by a mortar burst, Private Svehla refused medical treatment and continued to lead the attack. During the ensuing conflict, an enemy grenade fell in the midst of the group. While attempting to dispose of the grenade to protect his comrades from injury which might result from the explosion of the grenade, Private Svehla lost his life.
Department of the Army: General Orders No. 18 (February 18, 1953)
Home Town: Essex, New Jersey

SWEENEY, HARVEY O.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Harvey O. Sweeney (0-1334376), First Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company I, 3d Battalion, 35th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division. First Lieutenant Sweeney distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces at Tangwon-ni, Korea, on 7 and 8 September 1951. When his platoon came under intense enemy artillery and mortar attack, Lieutenant Sweeney left his place of safety and moved to an exposed vantage point to better direct the defense. Despite a painful wound, he moved fearlessly among his troops, and by his calm demeanor and unflinching courage, encouraged them to stand firm. Wounded a second time, he refused medical attention and constantly braved withering fire to assist the wounded and coordinate the holding action. Moving to a friendly machine-gun which had been silenced, he found the gun inoperative and returned through the fire-swept area to obtain a replacement. Wounded a third time in both legs and no longer able to move, he refused evacuation and ordered that he be carried to a position from which he could direct the defense, thus inspiring his men to contain successive enemy attacks throughout the night. Despite numerous casualties and a dwindling supply of ammunition, he continued to direct the defense, and by his skill and courageous example enabled his men to ward of the assailants until assistance arrived.
Department of the Army: General Orders No. 28 (March 13, 1952)
Home Town: Grant, Minnesota

*SWIHART, HAROLD M.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Harold M. Swihart (RA15415935), Master Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with an Infantry Company of the 7th Infantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division. Master Sergeant Swihart distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Kumhwa, Korea, on the night of 24 May 1953. On that night, a numerically superior enemy force began a probing maneuver in preparation for an attack on a strategic outpost forward of the main battle positions. Upon detection of the enemy, Sergeant Swihart, a squad leader of the security group, quickly moved among his men establishing a base of fire and directing their efforts to insure adequate support for a maneuvering element. As the aggressors continued their advance, Sergeant Swihart went forth to engage them, firing his weapon and hurling grenades to disorganize and retard their assault. As grenades landed amidst his men, Sergeant Swihart immediately threw them back at the enemy and, although completely exposed to the intense fire, he continued his aggressive action until the enemy was repulsed. In retreat, the hostile forces continued to throw grenades, one of which fell in the center of Sergeant Swihart's squad. Realizing the imminent danger to his men, he sacrificed his life by hurling himself on the missile and absorbing the full impact of the explosion. The courage of Sergeant Swihart throughout this action not only was instrumental in repelling the enemy assault, but also saved the lives of many of his comrades.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 242 (April 26, 1954)
Home Town: Wyandot, Ohio

SWING, WILLARD V., JR.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Willard V. Swing, Jr. (RA16301390), Private First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company D, 1st Battalion, 7th Cavalry Regiment (Infantry), 1st Cavalry Division. Private First Class Swing distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces near Madong, Korea, on 13 August 1950. On that date, the mortar platoon of which Private First Class Swing was a member came under devastating attacks by overwhelmingly numerically superior enemy forces and was forced to withdraw to new positions. In the hurried withdrawal to more tenable positions, the mortar ammunition, sorely needed by the mortar crews, was left behind in a trailer directly in the path of the advancing enemy forces. Realizing the helpless condition adjacent friendly forces would be in if their mortar support fire was withdrawn, Private Swing voluntarily and with complete disregard for his own safety, left his position of comparative safety and ran through the deadly hail of enemy machine-gun and small arms fire the trailer containing the ammunition. Upon his arrival, he noticed that increments of a number of mortar rounds in the trailer had been ignited by enemy fire and were in danger of exploding. Removing them, he pulled the trailer back to mortar positions and re-supplied the mortar crews. When he was wounded by a mortar shell landing a few feet away, Corporal Swing refused to be evacuated and, seizing his rifle, continued to fire at the advancing enemy until all his ammunition was expended, and then moved forward to drag several wounded comrades to cover. Despite the intense pain from his wounds, he remained in the enemy fire to care for the wounded and load rifle and carbine clips for his comrades until he was forcibly moved from the front lines. His selfless courage, aggressiveness and conspicuous devotion to duty in the face of grave danger was an inspiration to his entire company, saved many lives, and led to the successful repulse of the enemy attack.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 42 (January 26, 1951)
Home Town: Milwaukee, Wisconsin

*SWINNEY, CLARICE C.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Clarice C. Swinney (RA18335761), Private First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with a machine gun section of Company H, 2d Battalion, 7th Cavalry Regiment (Infantry), 1st Cavalry Division. Private First Class Swinney distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Waegwan, Korea, on 3 September 1950. On that date, Company F, 7th Cavalry Regiment, with an attached machine-gun section from Company H, was defensively deployed on Hill 300 near Waegwan when elements of a hostile division launched a mass attack against the hill preceded by a heavy artillery and mortar barrage. When it became apparent that the hill could not be held against the numerically superior enemy force, the company was ordered to withdraw. Private Swinney, a machine-gunner attached to the company, and two comrades volunteered to remain behind and cover the withdrawal. He remained at his gun delivering accurate, withering fire into the ranks of the advancing enemy until his position was overrun, then began throwing hand grenades and engaging the enemy in hand-to-hand combat. When the company launched a counterattack later in the day and regained the hill, Private Swinney was found dead beside his machine gun and the surrounding area was littered with enemy dead.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 461 (June 25, 1951)
Home Town: Tarrant, Texas

T

*TABOR, CHARLES ALLEN
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Charles Allen Tabor (RA15380543), Private First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company C, 1st Battalion, 19th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division. Private First Class Tabor distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces near Taepyon-ni, Korea, on 16 July 1950. During an attack by a superior enemy force, the enemy knocked out two of the 60 millimeter mortars by small arms fire. Private First Class Tabor stayed at his position with the one remaining mortar and continued to fire. The base plate of the remaining mortar was destroyed but he held the hot tube in his hands and continued to fire it until all the ammunition was exhausted. During this heroic action he suffered a broken arm.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 7 (July 23, 1950)
Home Town: Jefferson, Kentucky

TACKABERRY, THOMAS H.
(First Award)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Thomas H. Tackaberry (0-60504), Captain (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with an Infantry Company. Captain Tackaberry distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Chorwon, Korea, on 9 September 1952. On that morning, Captain Tackaberry voluntarily left the comparative safety of his command post and moved across a minefield under intense enemy artillery fire to aid a United Nations patrol that had become confused and disorganized when it commander became a casualty. Upon arrival at the scene, Captain Tackaberry, exposing himself to heavy small arms fire, immediately organized litter teams to take care of the wounded and then dispersed the men in small groups to minimize the danger. After instructing the lead group as to the safest route of withdrawal, Captain Tackaberry remained in the rear and covered the group's withdrawal with his own weapon until he was assured that the men had reached the safety of the main line of resistance. Through his courageous actions Captain Tackaberry prevented heavy casualties and saved the lives of many men already wounded.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 893 (September 29, 1953)
Other Award: Distinguished Service Cross w/OLC (Vietnam), Distinguished Service Cross w/2nd OLC (Vietnam)

*TAFT, PAUL B.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Paul B. Taft (RA19360008), Private First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company B, 13th Engineer Combat Battalion, 17th Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division. Private First Class Taft distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces at Soju-ri, Korea, on 17 November 1950. On that date, the advance of his platoon, with an accompanying tank, was stopped by intense cross-fire from two enemy machine-guns flanked by riflemen. Private First Class Taft ran through the fire-swept area and, although seriously wounded twice, succeeded in reaching the tank and directing its effective fire on the enemy machine-gun before dying from his wounds.
Department of the Army: General Orders No. 64 (June 30, 1952)
Home Town: Los Angeles, California

TAMEZ, RUDOLPH M.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Rudolph M. Tamez (0-67766), First Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Commanding an Infantry Company of the 32d Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division. First Lieutenant Tamez distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Kumhwa, Korea, on 15 October 1952. On that date, Lieutenant Tamez led his men through a heavy enemy barrage in an assault on commanding terrain features. As his troops approached the objective, the enemy added a concentrated barrage of small arms fire to the artillery fire. Realizing the consequences of a stalemate, Lieutenant Tamez bravely exposed himself to the enemy fire in order to move throughout the area, reorganizing his men and urging them forward. Through his brilliant leadership, the company was successful in securing a section of the objective. When Lieutenant Tamez realized that the objective of an adjacent company had not been taken, he voluntarily led a group of his men back across the valley floor, integrating remnants of the other unit with his own. Lieutenant Tamez led the force in a spirited assault which resulted in the ultimate capture of that sector of the position. After aiding in the evacuation of the wounded, Lieutenant Tamez returned to his unit's position on the hill and remained there, assisting his men in holding against enemy counter-attacks.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 817 (September 6, 1953)
Home Town: Bexar, Texas

TAYLOR, CLOVIS R.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Clovis R. Taylor (RA18005785), Private First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company H, 2d Battalion, 9th Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division. Private First Class Taylor distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces near Yongsan, Korea on the Naktong-gang River line, during the period from 31 August 1950 through 7 September 1950. On the night of 31 August 1950 the enemy launched an all-out attack in overwhelming numbers against the thinly held lines of the Ninth Infantry Regiment and was attempting to make a complete breakthrough and take Miryang, the gateway to Pusan. Private Taylor was part of a group of men from Companies H and D, Ninth Infantry who, during the initial phase of the enemy attack, were surrounded and cut off by the enemy. This group formed a small perimeter defense in an attempt to hold this ground and to slow down the general advance of the enemy. The perimeter was constantly subjected to intense enemy small arms, automatic weapons, mortar, and artillery fire and the enemy made continuous fanatical attacks against their position in an attempt to dislodge them. On 1 September 1950, Private Taylor was in the midst of every fire-fight and continually encouraged all those present by his actions and utter contempt for the enemy. He was wounded during one of the attacks but refused medical aid as medical supplies were low and there were others more seriously wounded who needed medical attention. On 2 September 1950, Corporal Taylor observed a long column of enemy climbing Hill 209 carrying large mortars with them which could be used against the men in the perimeter if set upon Hill 209. Expecting them to stop for rest before they reached the top of the hill, he had his machine-gun section held their fire. True to his expectations, the enemy column did stop for rest, and he directed the fire of his machine-gun section so effectively that sixty-seven of the enemy were killed and the mortars were destroyed. On 3 September 1950, during a particularly vicious enemy attack, Private Taylor, with utter disregard for his own personal safety, stood in a fully exposed position and alone killed twenty-five enemy with his rifle. On 4 September 1950, it was decided to abandon the perimeter and to leave in small groups and attempt to reach friendly lines. Private Taylor led six men through enemy territory, engaging in numerous fire-fights with the enemy, and finally arrived safely with all but two of his men.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 42 (January 25, 1951)
Home Town: Henderson, Texas

TAYLOR, ROYAL R.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Royal R. Taylor, Lieutenant Colonel (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as Executive Officer, 2d Battalion, 32d Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division. Lieutenant Colonel Taylor distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Chorwon, Korea, on 10 July 1953. On that date, Colonel Taylor assumed command of a battalion contesting the enemy for the control of an important position. Without regard for his own safety, Colonel Taylor entered the trenches and bunkers, re- established communication, organized small unit counterattacks, and personally issued grenades and ammunition to his men. Despite the intense enemy small-arms, artillery and mortar fire blanketing the entire area, Colonel Taylor fearlessly moved about the United Nations positions, encouraging and inspiring the men and personally directed and assisted in the evacuation of the dead and wounded. On one occasion, Colonel Taylor's bunker received a direct hit form an enemy artillery shell, destroying the position and burying him in the debris. After being dug out, Colonel Taylor refused evacuation and led his subordinate through a hail of enemy fire to reestablish the command post at a more forward position. Upon receiving orders to withdraw, Colonel Taylor directed the orderly movement of the troops and supervised the evaluation of the casualties, refusing to leave until arrangements were completed for the removal of all personnel.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 935 (October 17, 1953)

*TEDFORD, ROBERT A.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Robert A. Tedford (RA06573405), Master Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as a Tank Commander with the 25th Reconnaissance Company, 25th Infantry Division. Master Sergeant Tedford distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Pongon-ni, Korea, on 12 August 1950. Master Sergeant Tedford led his tank and one other tank into Pongon-ni with the mission of dislodging the enemy and supporting the unit's supply route. Realizing he was greatly outnumbered upon entering the town, he exposed himself in his turret to obtain better visibility in directing his driver and gunner. Sergeant Tedford refused to close the hatch on his tank and remained exposed while employing the .50 caliber machine-gun, and delivered a deadly hail fire into the ranks of the enemy. With utter disregard for his personal safety, he continued to fire his weapon at the enemy until he was killed. The accuracy of Sergeant Tedford's fire accounted for approximately fifty enemy dead, and his actions contributed materially to reopening the main supply route.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 232 (April 23, 1951)
Home Town: Los Angeles, California

TEETERS, BERNARD G.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Bernard G. Teeters, Lieutenant Colonel (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as Commanding Officer of the 1st Battalion, 35th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division. Lieutenant Colonel Teeters distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces near Chungam-ni, Korea, on 19 and 20 September 1950. Colonel Teeters' battalion launched an attack on Chungam-ni, the initial battalion objective in the Pusan perimeter breakthrough. A ridge occupied by a numerically superior, fanatical, and determined enemy commanded the approach. At 0800 hours on 19 September 1950, immediately upon crossing the line of departure, the attacking elements as well as the battalion command post and the reserve company were subjected to intense and uncannily accurate machine-gun, artillery, and mortar fire. When it became apparent that the attack was faltering and many casualties were imminent, Colonel Teeters purposely rose from his position of safety, exposing himself to the enemy with the view of instilling courage and aggressiveness in the wavering attack elements. The attacking force, inspired by his action, rallied and pressed forward. He then calmly moved forward with the lead attacking elements and, in full view of the enemy, directed and coordinated the attack. As a result of his skillful, heroic, and inspirational leadership, the strategic ridge was secured and many of the enemy were killed. On the morning of 20 September 1950, he prepared and coordinated an attack plan for the final assault upon Chungam-ni. As the lead elements prepared to launch their attack, the enemy again concentrated a furious and withering blanket of artillery fire on the position. Colonel Teeters, again moved from his position of safety and, with utter disregard for the hostile fire, reconnoitered a relatively safe route which enabled the companies to advance with a minimum of casualties. The skillful leadership, calmness, and confidence displayed by Colonel Teeters contributed immeasurably to the successful accomplishment of the battalion's mission.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 76 (1951)

TERRELL, EARNEST P.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Earnest P. Terrell (0-1688591), First Lieutenant (Field Artillery), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Battery A, 11th Field Artillery Battalion, 24th Infantry Division. First Lieutenant Terrell distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces near Taejon, Korea, during the period 19 July to 24 July 1950. On 19 July 1950, in a defensive position north of Taejon, Lieutenant Terrell kept his six 155-mm. howitzers firing throughout a twelve hour enemy artillery barrage during which accurate counter-battery fire was placed on his position killing several of his men and wounding many more. That night he displaced his battery to positions within the city of Taejon. Early on the morning of 20 July 1950 enemy tanks broke through the infantry lines and into the howitzer positions firing on them with tank guns and machineguns. Lieutenant Terrell personally directed the shifting of two of his howitzers to place direct fire on these tanks, destroying one and rapidly driving the remainder away. He kept his men firing despite enemy artillery and sniper fire. By mid-afternoon elements of enemy infantry had entered the city and Lieutenant Terrell was ordered to evacuate his position with whatever equipment he could save. He immediately evacuated all his battery personnel retaining only twelve men to help him retrieve the five remaining howitzers from an area now under enemy small arms fire. He successfully retrieved the howitzers and rejoined the convoy leaving the city. The blazing city was infested with enemy snipers and the roads leading out were blocked. Lieutenant Terrell was on a 3/4-ton truck which was destroyed by a direct hit. To prevent the road from being blocked he helped push the truck off the road. Three enlisted men assisting him at this time were killed. Climbing on one of his M-5 tractors he continued through the flaming part of the city and three miles out on the road which leads to Yong-dong. At that point he again encountered a road block and enemy machinegun fire hit the tractor causing the driver to lose control and crash into a telephone pole off the road. He again climbed aboard the next passing tractor and proceeded five miles on a road clogged with damaged vehicles. Here he dismounted and directed men to remove all of the injured and dead from the stalled vehicles. He then instructed his tractor driver to push all of the vehicles off the road with the tractor. It was while clearing the road at this point that Lieutenant Terrell sustained injuries from enemy mortar fire. After assisting in loading the over crowded remaining vehicles with wounded, Lieutenant Terrell directed that they proceed. He then joined a foot party. Lieutenant Terrell continued on to the south through the mountains with a small party. By the evening of 24 July 1950, dressed in native clothing and weak from hunger and exposure, Lieutenant Terrell arrived at the area of the 8th Cavalry Regiment. The extraordinary valor displayed by First Lieutenant Terrell on this occasion reflects the highest credit on himself and the military service.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 120 (October 18, 1950)
Home Town: Grady, Oklahoma

THORNTON, JOHN L.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to John L. Thornton (US55084926), Private First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with an Infantry Company of the 179th Infantry Regiment, 45th Infantry Division. Private First Class Thornton distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Songnae-dong, Korea, on 6 November 1952. On that date, Private Thornton was in a friendly position which was assaulted by an enemy force of estimated company strength. Unable to use machine-guns because of the route taken by the attacking forces, Private Thornton was advised to withdraw; however, realizing that he and his men were the only friendly troops remaining in the sector, he elected to hold his position. He organized a three-man perimeter defense and moved to the open ground in front of the position, bringing heavy and accurate rifle fire to bear on the enemy. When the hostile forces attacked with grenades, Private Thornton caught two of them in mid-air and hurled them back at the assailants; a third grenade exploded in his hand, blinding and partially paralyzing him. In spite of his condition, Private Thornton seized an enemy soldier who had closed with him and after a desperate struggle, hurled him down a hill. He then held his position until a friendly counterattacking force arrived and successfully repulsed the enemy.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 370 (April 8, 1953)
Home Town: Carlton, Minnesota

THROCKMORTON, JOHN LATHROP
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to John Lathrop Throckmorton, Lieutenant Colonel (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as Commanding Officer of the 5th Regimental Combat Team, 1st Cavalry Division. Lieutenant Colonel Throckmorton distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the Waewan-Kumchon area of Korea, on 17 and 18 September 1950. On these dates the 5th Cavalry Regiment attacked the key cities of Waegwan and Kumchon, capturing them, and succeeded in breaking the iron ring of the Pusan perimeter. During the entire successful engagement, Colonel Throckmorton personally directed the assaults of his forward battalions and front line companies. With utter disregard for his own personal safety, he moved from position to position along the entire front, exposing himself to heavy enemy small-arms, mortar, and direct tank fire in order to command his troops with the utmost effectiveness. East of Kumchon he assumed a position with the lead tanks some three hundred yards in advance of the foremost infantry. Despite intense enemy fire, which hit two friendly tanks in his immediate vicinity, he remained in his exposed position to personally supervise the movement of the leading tanks and infantry assault companies. His gallant leadership under the most adverse conditions inspired the men of his command to fight with an unconquerable will to succeed.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 79 (February 17, 1951)
Born: February 28, 1913 at Kansas City, Missouri
Home Town: Kansas City, Missouri

TOLBERT, JACK P.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Jack P. Tolbert (RA19296161), Sergeant First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company B, 1st Battalion, 65th Infantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division. Sergeant First Class Tolbert distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces near Kumhwa, Korea, on 11 June 1953. Sergeant Tolbert was one of two outpost guards on the main line of resistance when the area came under a heavy artillery and mortar bombardment. Observing a hostile infantryman approaching the position, he shouted a warning to the other sentinel and to the guard at the command post, enabling them to alert other elements of the imminent attack. Seconds later the enemy solider hurled a fragmentation grenade into the bunker. Fully aware of the danger involved, he stepped on the missile in an attempt to dispose of it or lessen its explosive effect and receive the full impact of the explosion. Although critically wounded in this display of valor, his prompt and unhesitating action prevented serious injury to his comrade. Inspired by his unflinching courage, the troops fought with great tenacity and skill, inflecting numerous casualties and containing the assault. Sergeant Tolbert's inspirational conduct and consummate devotion to duty reflect the highest credit upon himself and u-hold the esteemed traditions of the military service.
Department of the Army: General Orders No. 26 (April 2, 1954)
Home Town: Los Angeles, California

*TRENHOLM, RICHARD R.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Richard R. Trenholm (RA19403870), Private, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as a Medical Aidman with an Infantry Company of the 38th Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division. Private Trenholm distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Pia-ri, Korea, on 12 September 1951. On that date, Private Trenholm accompanied a force of infantrymen as they engaged in an assault against a heavily fortified, enemy-held hill. In the initial phase of the attack, the friendly troops were subjected to a heavy volume of automatic weapons and mortar fire. Many fell wounded, including Private Trenholm, who was severely wounded by an exploding mortar shell. Bleeding profusely and in great pain, Private Trenholm heard a wounded comrade call for aid. Although seriously weakened, he forced himself to his feet, made his way to the stricken soldier, and rendered aid. After assuring himself that the man was safe, Private Trenholm climbed painfully to a ridge to answer a second call for help. Upon reaching the hapless man, he dressed his wounds. Realizing that the soldier had to be evacuated for further treatment, Private Trenholm attempted to carry him down the exposed slope. While engaged in this task, a sudden burst of enemy machine- gun fire ended his life.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 275 (May 20, 1952)
Home Town: Whatcom, Washington

*TRINEN, WILLIAM P.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to William P. Trinen (0-1996377), First Lieutenant (Armor), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company C, 72d Medium Tank Battalion, 2d Infantry Division. First Lieutenant Trinen distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Changyong, Korea. On the night of 31 August 1950, Lieutenant Trinen was designated to command a task force, consisting of five tanks and an infantry platoon, with the mission of opening an escape route for an infantry battalion which had been completely encircled by the enemy. At first contact, the advanced enemy elements, stunned by the aggressive ferocity of the task force's attack, retreated in panic. As Lieutenant Trinen's unit moved further forward, the reorganized enemy, backed by seemingly unlimited reserves, launched a massed attack. During this action, the infantry platoon leader was killed and Lieutenant Trinen immediately opened the turret of his lead tank and directed the infantry attack by arm and hand signals. Despite hits on his tank by enemy anti-tank weapons and satchel charges, he continued to press forward in the attack, forcing the major elements of the enemy force to withdraw to the protection of a nearby slope. The aggressive leadership, courage and sound tactical judgment displayed by First Lieutenant Trinen resulted in the success of the mission.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 572 (July 22, 1951)
Home Town: Kitsap, Washington

TRUITT, JOSEPH M.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Joseph M. Truitt (RA14276625), Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 9th Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division. Sergeant Truitt distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Chang- nak, Korea, on 19 September 1950. On that date, Company I was attacked by a strong enemy force and forced to withdraw from positions on Hill 201. The withdrawing unit was hampered by numerous casualties inflicted by the enemy and was forced to leave four seriously wounded men on the hill. Sergeant Truitt, a member of the Regimental Intelligence and Reconnaissance Platoon which was in position at the base of the hill, volunteered to climb three hundred and fifty yards to attempt to rescue them. As he neared the position, an enemy grenade exploded close by, knocking him down and wounding him in the chest. Despite the intense enemy fire and the pain from his wound, he continued up the fire-swept slope until he reached the wounded men. After administering first aid to the four stricken men, he carried one of them to a safe position at the foot of the hill. The heroic act of Sergeant Truitt so inspired one of his comrades that he volunteered to assist in the rescue operation, and together they succeeded in bringing two more of the wounded men down the slope to safety. During this second trip, Sergeant Truitt was knocked down twice by enemy grenades exploding close to him, but each time he regained his feet and continued on his self- imposed mission. Although weakened by loss of blood, and with enemy fire on the area increasing in intensity, he made a third trip up the hillside and succeeded in bringing the last of the wounded men to safety.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 425 (June 12, 1951)
Home Town: Washington, Tennessee

TYBROSKI, MAX M.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Max M. Tybroski, Sergeant First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company K, 3d Battalion, 23d Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division. Sergeant First Class Tybroski distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Chaun-ni, Korea, on 18 May 1951. On that date, Sergeant First Class Tybroski's company was subjected to a savage attack by a numerically superior enemy force while manning defensive positions near Chaun-ni. With complete disregard for his personal safety, and heedless of the intense enemy fire, Sergeant Tybroski led his platoon to positions on high ground to the enemy's flank from which flanking fire could be brought to bear on the hostile positions. The aggressive leadership and courageous actions of Sergeant Tybroski in executing this flanking movement resulted in 150 of the enemy being killed, and diverted the hostile fire to his platoon's position, thereby enabling the remainder of his battalion to effect an orderly withdrawal with minimum casualties.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 417 (June 9, 1951)

TYLER, RUSSELL P.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Russell P. Tyler, Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company K, 3d Battalion, 21st Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division. Sergeant Tyler distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces north of Taejon, Korea, on 10 July 1950. On this date, Sergeant Tyler's platoon was engaged in a counterattack which, largely due to his outstanding leadership, was successful in attaining its objective. During the fight he was wounded in the knee; but ignoring his own injuries, he rescued a fellow soldier who was wounded and lying in front of the position by going to his aid in the face of sniper and machine-gun fire. He also directed accurate mortar fire on enemy positions. He refused to be evacuated until the position had been consolidated and darkness had fallen. The next day, hearing that his company was being overrun, he left the hospital and, gathering up a group of stragglers, organized a roadblock with a view to stopping the enemy advance. He continued to direct the activities of the men comprising the roadblock until the enemy overran the position and he was ordered to withdraw.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 12 (July 28, 1950)

TYRRELL, STANLEY C.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Stanley C. Tyrrell, Major (Infantry), [then Captain], U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as Commanding Officer Company F, 2d Battalion, 23d Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division. Major Tyrrell distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Konmae-ri, Korea, on 28 January 1951. On that date, while en route to rescue a reconnaissance patrol that had been surrounded by the enemy, Major Tyrrell's company encountered two bodies of hostile troops, one of company strength and the other numbering approximately sixty men. Although heavy fire came pouring down on the friendly troops from all sides, Major Tyrrell, setting a personal example of utter fearlessness, led his men against the foe and, after a bitter engagement, the friendly force routed the enemy from the area with heavy casualties. Then, proceeding on his mission, the company made its way to the ambushed patrol. Upon reaching the area, Major Tyrrell found a wounded friendly soldier who informed him that eight members of his patrol had been killed and the remainder taken prisoner. The next day Major Tyrrell was assigned a similar mission. After leading his men to a point a short distance from another encircled patrol, Major Tyrrell's company was subjected to intense enemy small-arms and automatic-weapons fire. Completely exposing himself to the heavy fire, Major Tyrrell positioned the supporting heavy weapons of his company and then personally led two platoons in a daring assault against the hostile positions. Inspired by the matchless fighting spirit of Major Tyrrell, the friendly troops forced the enemy to flee from their positions in disorder. After supervising the evacuation of the beleaguered patrol, Major Tyrrell reorganized his men and led them in a skillful withdrawal from the area.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 278 (May 31, 1952)

U

UFFMAN, MILTON F.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Milton F. Uffman (0-60383), Captain (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Headquarters, 1st Battalion, 17th Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division. Captain Uffman distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces near Kuram, Korea, on 19 February 1951. Captain Uffman, as the battalion S-2 on a reconnaissance mission, accompanied forward elements of his battalion on a mission to attack and take a heavily wooded mountain, well-defended by a stubbornly resisting enemy force. The plan for securing the objective was to make a frontal attack up the steep slopes and over the enemy-held ridge lines. During the attack, the leading assault company was met by devastating fire from a well-entrenched enemy machine-gun crew and was pinned down. Realizing that the company was in danger of annihilation, Captain Uffman, under intense grenade and automatic-weapons fire, charged the enemy stronghold and, firing his pistol, killed the machine-gunner and forced the four other crew members to flee. Then, picking up the abandoned machine gun and two belts of ammunition, Captain Uffman moved forward in the face of intense enemy fire, shooting the weapon from his hip and inflicting heavy casualties on the hostile troops. As he was expending the second belt of ammunition, the machine-gun jammed from overheating and simultaneously, he was seriously wounded by a burst of enemy fire; however, his absolute fearlessness against such great odds so disrupted and demoralized the enemy that the friendly troops were able to continue the assault, overrun the hostile positions, and complete their mission.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 457 (June 25, 1951)
Home Town: St. Louis, Missouri

*URBANO, ISIDRO D.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Isidro D. Urbano (0-1324892), First Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with an Infantry Company of the 31st Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division. First Lieutenant Urbano distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Kumhwa, Korea, on 18 September 1952. On that date, Lieutenant Urbano was leading a patrol that had been ordered to assault an enemy-held hill for the purpose of taking prisoners of war. As the group was approaching the objective, it was pinned down by an intense barrage of sniper, machine-gun, and mortar fire. In the devastating rain of fire, the patrol became disorganized and suffered numerous casualties. Disregarding his personal safety, Lieutenant Urbano moved among the men, reorganized them and encouraging them. He was preparing to move on to their objective when he received order from the battalion commander to withdraw. As he supervised the withdrawal, Lieutenant Urbano saw a wounded comrade lying in an exposed position. Unhesitatingly he moved towards the wounded man in an attempt to rescue him, firing his weapon at the enemy as ranks. Lieutenant Urbano almost reached his comrade when he was mortally wounded.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 507 (May 24, 1953)
Home Town: San Francisco, California

V

*VAN ANTWERP, FRANK G.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Frank G. Van Antwerp (RA19305648), Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as a Medical Aidman attached to an Infantry Company of the 5th Regimental Combat Team, 1st Cavalry Division. Sergeant Van Antwerp distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the Republic of Korea on 17 September 1950. As an aidman, Sergeant Van Antwerp was advancing with an infantry rifle platoon when intense enemy fire was suddenly encountered, pinning them down in a position devoid of adequate cover or concealment and causing heavy casualties. The heavy volume of enemy fire prevented anyone from rising any appreciable distance from the ground, but Sergeant Van Antwerp managed to crawl along the entire front line administering aid to the wounded. Even though darkness and heavy rain added to his difficulties, he continued to perform his duties in a manner that gave courage and hope to the wounded. When his medical supplies were exhausted, he crawled along the front lines and collected first aid packets, using them until they too were exhausted. New casualties continued to develop during the night due to renewed enemy aggressiveness, and it was physically impossible to remove all wounded to the rear. Despite that fact that he had used all of his medical supplies, he continued to seek out the wounded and assist them as best he could. While he was crawling forward under heavy enemy fire attempting to evacuate a wounded comrade he was struck by enemy fire and mortally wounded.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 19, (January 12, 1951) as amended by General Orders No. 129 (1951)
Home Town: Los Angeles, California

*VAN CLEAVE, RICHARD C.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Richard C. Van Cleave (RA18347428), Corporal, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company A, 1st Battalion, 17th Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division. Corporal Van Cleave distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Chonjae-dong, Korea, on 28 May 1951. On that date, Corporal Van Cleave was a member of the lead squad in his unit's assault against a well-entrenched and determined enemy force. Several attempts to advance were made by the lead elements, but all of them were repulsed by the enemy. As darkness approached, Corporal Van Cleave, armed with grenades and a rifle, charged the enemy in the face of intense small-arms and automatic-weapons fire and single-handedly destroyed an enemy machine- gun emplacement, killing the entire crew. At this time, the entire company, inspired by Corporal Van Cleave's actions, rose from their positions and joined in an assault that successfully routed the enemy. Near the summit of the hill just secured, a band of enemy soldiers regrouped to make a final stand. Corporal Van Cleave charged into their devastating fire and, although seriously wounded, closed with the enemy and engaged them in hand-to-hand combat. Completely demoralized by his aggressiveness, the remaining enemy forces fled. Corporal Van Cleave remained in command of his squad throughout the night and, not until the final objective was secured, did he finally collapse from and later die of the many wounds he had received.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 624 (August 8, 1951)
Home Town: Lubbock, Texas

VAN HOVE, JAMES T.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to James T. Van Hove, Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with an Infantry Company. Sergeant Van Hove distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Kowang-San, Korea, on 23 November 1951. On that date, the positions held by Sergeant Van Hove's company were subjected to an intense enemy artillery barrage. Observing that the men about him were becoming confused by the heavy shelling, Sergeant Van Hove reorganized them and directed their fire against large numbers of the enemy where were now charging up the slope towards the friendly perimeter. Moving constantly among his men, reorganizing their positions and offering words of encouragement, he discovered that their supply of ammunition was dangerously low. Immediately, he led several men through the heavy fire to a supply point and returned with vitally needed ammunition. Upon reaching the positions held by his squad, Sergeant Van Hove observed several of the enemy attempting to breach the barbed wire before the friendly perimeter. Without hesitation, he seized an automatic rifle from the hands of a fallen comrade and moved forward, firing rapidly. His bold attack killed and wounded many of the enemy and eliminated the threat of a hostile penetration at that point. A short time later, the enemy massed before the perimeter and so, arming himself grenades, Sergeant Van Hove charged toward them, making such effective use of his grenades that six of the enemy were killed and three wounded. Through his inspiring leadership and fighting spirit, the hostile force was repulsed with heavy casualties.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 254 (May 19, 1952)

VAN ORMAN, CHESTER W.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Chester W. Van Orman (0-2212006), Sergeant First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company C, 1st Battalion, 19th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division. Sergeant First Class Van Orman distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces near Taepyon-Ni, Korea, on 16 July 1950. On that date, the position of the 2d platoon, Company C, 19th Infantry Regiment was being overrun by an enemy of superior force. With complete disregard for his own safety, Sergeant First Class Van Orman exposed himself to enemy fire by standing and firing tracer ammunition to direct mortar fire on the enemy. He organized the remaining two platoons of Company C, setting up a perimeter defense and then went to deliver a message to Company A. Finding Company A had withdrawn, Sergeant First Class Van Orman returned to his unit, remaining in the position until every man had withdrawn. He then led the men through mountainous terrain to join friendly forces. His courage and aggressive leadership reflects the highest credit on himself and the military service.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 7 (July 23, 1950)
Home Town: Androscoggin, Maine

*VANDERVOORT, WILLIAM A.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to William A. Vandervoort (RA17234635), Private, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company C, 1st Battalion, 5th Regimental Combat Team, 1st Cavalry Division. Private Vandervoort distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces at Taejon-ni, Korea, on 12 August 1950. While participating in the defense of a strategic terrain feature, Private Vandervoort's company became engaged in heavy fighting, repulsing a series of attacks launched against the position by a determined enemy. During this action and while repeatedly exposing himself to enemy fire, Private Vandervoort was wounded. He was placed in a foxhole for protection against enemy fire and to receive medical treatment. Launching a concerted attack on the company positions a short time later, the enemy lobbed a grenade into the emplacement occupied by Private Vandervoort and an aidman. As the result of the explosion of the grenade, he lost his life when his body absorbed its full blast.
Department of the Army: General Orders No. 49 (June 9, 1953)
Home Town: Sturgis, South Dakota

*VANGSNESS, RALPH J.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Ralph J. Vangsness (RA06858371), Master Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company C, 1st Battalion, 27th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division. Master Sergeant Vangsness distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces near Hwanggan, Korea, on 28 July 1950. On this date Company C bore the brunt of a determined enemy attack and the unit was ordered to withdraw through the perimeter of a contiguous company's sector into the battalion reserve. Sergeant Vangsness led a group of men across a river in the initial phase of the withdrawal. By skillful maneuvering he led the men through an area covered by withering hostile fire and had arrived at the crest of a hill a short distance from friendly lines when he was critically wounded. When one of the men in the group attempted to assist him, Sergeant Vangsness, heedless of his own plight and aware that remaining in his precarious position meant almost certain death, ordered the men who had offered to assist him to leave the area immediately and save themselves from capture. By his conspicuous courage, selfless regard for the welfare of his comrades, and exemplary leadership, Master Sergeant Vangsness was instrumental in saving the lives of a large number of men who would otherwise have been captured or killed.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 89 (October 1, 1950)
Home Town: Lawrence, Pennsylvania

*VAUGHN, DONALD C.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Donald C. Vaughn (RA14312142), Private First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company A, 1st Battalion, 21st Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division. Private First Class Vaughn distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Chupari, Korea, on 8 July 1951. On that date, Private Vaughn was a scout with the lead squad of Company A, which was on a reconnaissance patrol to determine the strength and disposition of the enemy. Upon contacting the enemy, the lead squad immediately assaulted the hostile outpost and succeeded in neutralizing it. As the company moved forward to the base of their primary objective and another squad advanced to accomplish the next phase of the mission, Private Vaughn volunteered to go with them in their assault. As Private Vaughn reached higher ground, he observed that the hitherto hidden enemy platoons were moving out in a flanking movement aimed at encircling the friendly forces. Immediate, He ordered the patrol back and took up an exposed position to cover their withdrawal. Although his position was subjected to a deadly a crossfire from the enemy, Private Vaughn succeeded in pinning down the hostile forces with his intense and accurate rifle fire long enough for his comrades to reach safety before he was hit and mortally wounded.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 703 (September 18, 1951)
Home Town: Hamblen, Tennessee

VAUGHN, WILBERT F.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Wilbert F. Vaughn (0-2036086), First Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with an Infantry Company of the 23d Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division. First Lieutenant Vaughn distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Sangpobang, Korea, on 31 July 1952. On that date, Lieutenant Vaughn led a four-man volunteer patrol on a mission to neutralize an enemy marching-gun which was holding up the advance of a friendly platoon assaulting an enemy-held hill. Shortly after the patrol left the line of departure, three of the men were wounded and had to be evacuated. Despite the loss of three of his men, Lieutenant Vaughn advanced toward the emplacement and, reaching an exposed vantage point, threw several grenades at the gun position, forcing the enemy to withdraw to move covered positions. While the remaining man of his patrol held the hostile forces at bay, Lieutenant Vaughn made repeated trips across the fire-swept terrain to secure additional ammunition and a flame thrower. Lieutenant Vaughn then led the platoon in a vicious charge against the hostile troops, neutralizing the hill and permitting the friendly forces to secure the objective. Lieutenant Vaughn continued to hold the position until he was seriously wounded by enemy mortar fire in a devastating barrage.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 324 (March 23, 1953)
Home Town: Anderson, South Carolina

*VERA, MIGUEL A.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Miguel A. Vera (US50110351), Private, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company F, 2d Battalion, 38th Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division. Private Vera distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces at Chorwon, Korea, on 21 September 1952. On that date, Private Vera's unit was committed to assault and secure the right sector of "Old Baldy" and, although wounded in an earlier engagement, he voluntarily rejoined elements of the platoon regrouping at the base of the hill to resume the attack. Forging up the bare, rocky slope in skirmisher formation, the troops came within twenty yards of hostile positions when they were subjected to heavy artillery and mortar barrages and intense cross-fire from automatic weapons and grenades, which forced them to move back. He selflessly remained behind to cover the withdrawal and, maintaining a determined stand, poured crippling fire into enemy emplacements. During this action he lost his life.
Department of the Army: General Orders No. 37 (April 29, 1953)
Home Town: Puerto Rico

W


*WAGNER, BURTON ALES
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Burton Ales Wagner (RA16242452), Sergeant First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company A, 8th Engineer Combat Battalion, 1st Cavalry Division. Sergeant First Class Wagner distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces at Yopo-ri, North Korea, on 2 December 1950. Given the mission of providing security for a crew from his company in the process of building a bridge across the Taedong River, Sergeant First Class Wagner was checking his positions for maximum defense when suddenly attacked by Chinese Communist troops apparently intent on sweeping through his line of resistance and destroying the bridgehead. He courageously moved forward alone to engage and sufficiently delay the foe in order that the members of the crew might be alerted against surprise attack. Armed only with a carbine, he fearlessly exposed himself to enemy observation and action and delivered a deadly accurate fire into the advancing hostile force until his position was overrun and he was mortally wounded. Sergeant Wagner's magnificent stand alerted the company and enabled the men to contain the enemy attack and save the bridgehead.
Department of the Army: General Orders No. 85 (September 25, 1951)
Home Town: Stephenson, Illinois

WALD, OLIVER B.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Oliver B. Wald, Corporal, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company I, 3d Battalion, 9th Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division. Corporal Wald distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Sogong-ni, Korea, on 25 May 1951. On that date, Corporal Wald's company was given the mission of attacking and securing Hill 800 at Sogong-ni. Approaching to within two hundred yards of the objective, the company was subjected to murderous fire from the enemy positions and the attack was temporarily halted. Two squads were ordered forward in an assault while the remainder of the company furnished covering fire for the operation. Upon reaching the top of the hill, Sergeant Wald, leader of one of the assault squads, and his squad were subjected to as fanatical enemy counterattack and were forced to withdraw due to the numerical superiority of the enemy. Heedless of the intense fire, Sergeant Wald remained in an exposed position, throwing grenades at the attacking force and placing effective rifle fire on them until his squad reached cover. After regrouping, the entire company assaulted the hill. Again Sergeant Wald led the attack, moving forward in the face of withering fire. His aggressive leadership so inspired the men around him that they followed him to the top of the hill, engaged the enemy in hand-to-hand combat, and forced them to flee in wild disorder, leaving numerous dead and wounded on the hill.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 485 (July 1, 1951)

*WALKER, ROBERT BENJAMIN
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Robert Benjamin Walker (0-39384), Captain (Cavalry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as Commanding Officer of Company L, 3d Battalion, 7th Cavalry Regiment (Infantry), 1st Cavalry Division. Captain Walker distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces near Taegu, Korea, on 12 September 1950. Cavalry Regiment, First Cavalry Division, on 12 September 1950. When his company was pinned down by heavy enemy fire during an attack on stubbornly held Hill 314, it was viciously counterattacked by North Korean troops who inflicted heavy casualties. With utter disregard for his safety, Captain Walker charged forward into a veritable hail of enemy fire, shooting his carbine and exhorting his men to follow him. His company, inspired by their commander's courage, moved forward, aggressively following him in the vicious and bloody assault, engaged the enemy in hand-to-hand combat, and pursued the foes down the mountain until halted by Captain Walker. On 24 September 1950, while leading a reinforced platoon on patrol through enemy-infested territory in the vicinity of Sangju, his patrol suddenly receive heavy automatic fire from enemy entrenched in a rice paddy. While the troops were deploying to return the fire, they were fired on from the rear by an enemy group that had been by-passed in the aggressive advance. Captain Walker was seriously wounded, but he voluntarily exposed himself to draw fire in his direct, thus enabling his men to take cover, locate the enemy and annihilate the. During this fierce fight he was fatally wounded.
Department of the Army: General Orders No. 50 (July 16, 1951)
Born: September 11, 1918 at Grant, Wisconsin
Home Town: Madison, Wisconsin

WALKER, WALTON HARRIS
(Second Award)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting a Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster in lieu of a Second Award of the Distinguished Service Cross to Walton Harris Walker (0-3405), Lieutenant General, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as Commanding General of the 8th United States Army. Lieutenant General Walker distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the Republic of Korea from 14 July to 28 September 1950. During this campaign General Walker personally, and at great risk to his own life from enemy ground fire, performed repeated aerial reconnaissance flights in unarmed plane deep into enemy territory. The knowledge gained by General Walker from these flights was of inestimable value to him in making tactical decisions, and contributed greatly to the accomplishment of his mission in spite of the preponderance of force possessed by the enemy. In addition to the above and with personal disregard not only of health of but life itself, he spent hour after hour and day after day on the battlefield, inspiring the United Nations forces with his own courage and his will to fight. Where acts of personal courage were common, General Walker's fearlessness and courageous leadership were outstanding.
General Headquarters Far East Command: General Orders No. 33 (October 1, 1950)
Born: December 3, 1889 at Belton, Texas
Home Town: Belton, Texas
Other Award: Distinguished Service Cross (WWII)

*WALL, PAUL A.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Paul A. Wall (ER55004319), Sergeant First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as a Platoon Sergeant with a platoon of Company B, 1st Battalion, 9th Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division. Sergeant First Class Wall distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Chapyang-ni, Korea, on 2 January 1951. On that date, Company C, while holding Hill 451, was attacked by overwhelming numbers of the enemy and forced to withdraw. Sergeant Wall's unit was assigned the mission of assaulting the objective and recapturing the lost positions. As platoon sergeant of the lead platoon, Sergeant Wall led his men forward and immediately deployed them in advantageous positions along a ridge overlooking the enemy. Suddenly, a concealed machine gun opened fire and threatened to annihilate the friendly troops. With total disregard for his personal safety, Sergeant Wall, rushed the enemy emplacement, silencing it with grenades and rifle fire, and continued his single- handed assault until he fell, mortally wounded.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 614 (August 4, 1951)
Home Town: Crawford, Wisconsin

WALLACE, WILLIAM C.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to William C. Wallace (0-1309632), Captain (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as Commanding Officer of Company B, 1st Battalion, 9th Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division. Captain Wallace distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Kunu-ri, Korea, on 25 November 1950. On that date, Company B was given the mission of attacking Hill 219 which was occupied by a well entrenched, numerically superior enemy force. To reach the objective it was necessary to take three knolls immediately in front of the enemy's position. Fighting with grim determination under the gallant leadership of Captain Wallace, the lead platoon took the first two knolls but were pinned down as they approached the third. Fully exposing himself to the deadly fire, Captain Wallace threw grenades into the enemy positions, enabling the remainder of his company to execute a flanking movement and seize the third knoll. Although painfully wounded in the face during this action, he again exposed himself to enemy fire, secured tank support and personally directed fire on the enemy strong points, inflicting heavy casualties and enabling his company to take the objective. The extraordinary heroism and inspiring leadership displayed by Captain Wallace reflect great credit on himself and are in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 235 (April 25, 1951)
Home Town: Dinwiddie, Virginia

WALLS, CLAUDE R.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Claude R. Walls, Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company C, 1st Battalion, 38th Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division. Sergeant Walls distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Mug-gol, Korea, on 18 May 1951. On that date, the 2d Platoon of Company C had the mission of protecting the forward battalion command post and was deployed on a ridge to the front of the command post. Sergeant Walls, a member of the platoon, was at the observation post of the platoon when a numerically superior enemy force launched a sudden, ferocious attack against the ridge. Armed with an automatic rifle, Sergeant Walls swept the assaulting force with withering automatic-rifle fire, inflicting numerous casualties on the enemy and halting the attack before withdrawing to the platoon perimeter. When the hostile force launched a second attack, the platoon was cut off from the battalion and forced to withdraw in order to reestablish contact. Sergeant Walls and one comrade voluntarily remained in position to cover the withdrawal of the platoon. As the enemy approached to within grenade range of his position, Sergeant Walls leaped from his foxhole and began hurling grenades at the advancing enemy and raking them with deadly automatic-rifle fire. When his comrade was wounded by enemy fire, Sergeant Walls rushed to him, rendered first aid and then began carrying him to safety, stopping every few yards to deliver devastating fire on the enemy. The aggressive actions of Sergeant Walls during his fearless two-hour stand against numerically overwhelming odds enabled his platoon to establish more favorable positions and reorganize for renewed and successful defensive action. The extraordinary heroism of Sergeant Walls reflects great credit on himself and is in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 475 (June 2, 1951)

WALLS, HENRY R., JR.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Henry R. Walls, Jr. (0-1882259), Second Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with an Infantry Company of the 15th Infantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division. Second Lieutenant Walls distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Ujang-ni, Korea, on 16 April 1953. On that date, Lieutenant Walls led a support element through an artillery and mortar barrage to a point where a friendly patrol was involved in a fire-fight with a numerically superior hostile force. Upon reaching the scene, Lieutenant Walls immediately set up an effective base of fire and moved among his men, directing their fire and shouting words of encouragement. When a grenade wounded him so that it was impossible for him to walk, Lieutenant Walls crawled forward to a position from which he could exercise better control of his men; but he was again wounded by burp gun fire and was rendered incapable of movement. When the hostile forces overran the area, Lieutenant Walls was assumed to be dead and enemy soldiers removed his pistol and personal possessions. When the battle turned and friendly reinforcements arrived, Lieutenant Walls was still unconscious, but as medical aidmen placed him on a stretcher he regained consciousness and ordered the men to leave him until all other wounded had been evacuated.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 561 (June 11, 1953)
Home Town: Prince Georges, Maryland

*WARE, WILLIAM DUBOIS (MIA)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to William DuBois Ware (0-967794), Second Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company I, 3d Battalion, 24th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division. Second Lieutenant Ware distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces west of Sangju, Korea, on 26 July 1950. On that date, Lieutenant Ware, Platoon Leader, Company I, placed personnel of his platoon in a defensive position on a ridge to the Battalion's front. The position was attacked from three sides by numerically superior enemy force armed with automatic weapons and supported by mortar fire. The position soon became untenable and Lieutenant Ware, arming himself with a rifle, ordered his men to withdraw. He was last seen firing from his position on the advancing enemy until his position was overrun.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 54 (September 6, 1950)
Home Town: Fayette, Texas

*WARNER, CHARLES L.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Charles L. Warner (0-64284), Second Lieutenant (Field Artillery), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with serving as a Forward Observer of the 158th Field Artillery Battalion, 45th Infantry Division. Second Lieutenant Warner distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Tumyong-dong, Korea, late on the night of 15 June 1952. On that date, Lieutenant Warner was with an infantry company occupying a strategically located hill. Suddenly the company was subjected to an intense artillery barrage followed by a fanatical attack, by a numerically superior hostile force. Despite the fact that he had been wounded early in the action, Lieutenant Warner remained at his post, adjusting artillery fire which inflicted heavy casualties on the enemy. With wave after wave of screaming enemy troops assaulting the friendly position, Lieutenant Warner's radio was destroyed by enemy fire, but he continued to call in fire directions by using the company's radio and relaying his adjustments through the infantry battalion. Wounded again, he still refused evacuation, but remained throughout the night in a shallow trench, relaying every request for supporting fire. Early the following morning it was discovered that he had received fourteen wounds, and he was ordered to a rear area for medical treatment. As he was being placed on a stretcher for evacuation, a direct hit by an enemy mortar killed him instantly.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 597 (October 4, 1952)
Home Town: Jackson, Mississippi

*WARNER, LEONARD KALANI
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Leonard Kalani Warner (0-1331791), First Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company H, 2d Battalion, 5th Regimental Combat Team, 1st Cavalry Division. First Lieutenant Warner distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Umjich-on, Korea, on 22 and 23 April 1951. On the night of 22 April 1951, a machine-gun platoon from Company H, commanded by Lieutenant Warner, was attached to Company F to assist them in an assault against well-fortified enemy positions on Hill 565. After a fierce firefight, the friendly forces secured their objective and began to consolidate their positions in anticipation of a counterattack by the enemy. While setting up their defenses, the unit was suddenly subjected to a devastating volume of mortar and artillery fire. In the wake of this barrage, the enemy hurled repeated assaults against the unit's defenses in a fanatical effort to dislodge the friendly forces from their newly won positions. Throughout the shelling and subsequent attacks, Lieutenant Warner, totally disregarding his personal safety, moved along the ridgeline in full view of the enemy encouraging his men and directing their fire. His heroic actions inspired the men to hold their positions and to maintain their perimeter of defense in the face of the intense enemy fire. After several hours of frenzied attacks by overwhelming numbers of the enemy, heavy casualties among the friendly forces made the positions untenable and the unit began to withdraw. Lieutenant Warner moved from emplacement to emplacement to ensure that none of his men were left behind and, when last seen early in the morning of 23 April 1951, he was fighting hand-to-hand with a group of enemy soldiers.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 714 (September 21, 1951)
Born: April 23, 1924 at Honolulu, Hawaii
Home Town: Honolulu, Hawaii

*WATTS, CLEVELAND E.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Cleveland E. Watts (RA14314805), Private First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company I, 3d Battalion, 7th Infantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division. Private First Class Watts distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Tongmang'ni, Korea, on 25 April 1951. On that date, Private Watt's company was occupying defensive positions when it was attacked by a large and determined enemy force. After several frenzied attacks had occurred, Private Watts noticed that one of his platoon's automatic riflemen had been wounded and was unable to continue delivering effective fire on the enemy. With utter disregard for his personal safety, and despite the withering enemy fire directed at him, he rushed to the aid of the wounded soldier and administered emergency first aid, which saved the man's life. Realizing that the firepower of the company would be considerably weakened by the lack of the automatic rifle's fire, Private Watts picked up the weapon and jumped from his covered position to deliver such an extremely effective concentration of fire that the enemy attacks were repulsed. When the automatic rifle's ammunition was expended, he discarded it and, using his own rifle, continued to deliver deadly and accurate fire on the enemy. Although mortally wounded in this action, he refused to be evacuated, insisting on fighting until the enemy had been completely repelled. His selfless courage and outstanding devotion to duty were a direct contribution to the success of his unit in holding its positions against an overwhelming enemy force.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 630 (August 11, 1951)
Home Town: Fairfield, South Carolina

*WEATHERS, LOGAN CHRISTOPHER (MIA)
(Second Award)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting a Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster in lieu of a Second Award of the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Logan Christopher Weathers (0-2012542), First Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with 8066th Mechanized Reconnaissance Platoon attached to the 89th Medium Tank Battalion, 29th Regimental Combat Team, 24th Infantry Division. First Lieutenant Weathers distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces near Haman, Korea, on 2 August 1950. The 8066th Reconnaissance Platoon was spearheading an attack by the 19th Regimental Combat Team when they came under enemy fire which included mortar and bazooka fire. Lieutenant Weathers' vehicle received a direct hit and his arm was partially blown off. At that instant the infantry came under terrific enemy machine-gun and, despite his serious wound, Lieutenant Weathers seized his rifle and, single-handed, attacked an enemy machine-gun nest. He silence the machine-gun nest but during this action he was killed by sniper fire.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 46 (August 31, 1950)
Born: 1911 at Cleveland, North Carolina
Home Town: Cleveland, North Carolina
Other Award: Distinguished Service Cross (WWII)

WEAVER, LEO A., JR.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Leo A. Weaver, Jr., Second Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company B, 1st Battalion, 19th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division. Second Lieutenant Weaver distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces near Sesim-ni, Korea, on the night of February 3 - 4, 1951. On those dates, Company G was in defensive positions along the Han River, preparing to resume an attack against the enemy the following day. Later that night the enemy began probing friendly lines in a series of harassing skirmishes, climaxing in a massed attack at midnight. Lieutenant Weaver, who was at the Company Headquarters, organized all available men, formed an assault squad, and led it toward the strongest point of enemy penetration. This movement was detected by the enemy, and his squad was subjected to an intense volume of small-arms and grenade fire. As Lieutenant Weaver ordered his men to close with the enemy, a concussion grenade exploded nearly, knocking him to the ground. Rising immediately, he charged from one hostile position to another, engaging the enemy in hand-to-hand combat and killing them with bayonet slashes and rifle smashes. During this action, he single-handedly killed an estimated thirty enemy soldiers. His daring assault completely demoralized the enemy troops, and they fled in disorder, leaving the company's defense line intact.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 502 (July 3, 1951)

WEAVER, WOODROW L.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Woodrow L. Weaver, Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company C, 1st Battalion, 15th Infantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division. Sergeant Weaver distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces near Uijongbu, Korea, on 23 March 1951. On that date, Company C had the mission of attacking and seizing Hill 155, located in the vicinity of Uijongbu. Due to the intensity of enemy fire, the attack faltered and the friendly forces were temporarily halted. Sergeant Weaver, with complete disregard for his own safety, left his position of cover and advanced alone toward the enemy emplacements. As he approached the hostile positions, intense grenade and rifle fire was directed at him. Pressing forward despite the extreme danger, he tossed grenades into the hostile positions and engaged several of the enemy in hand-to-hand combat, killing them. Sergeant Weaver then continued to move toward the crest of the hill, neutralizing other enemy positions as he advanced. His actions were so inspiring to the remainder of the company that his comrades stormed the hostile positions, overwhelming the enemy troops, and securing the objective.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 467 (June 28, 1951)

WEBEL, JAMES B.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to James B. Webel, Captain (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as Operations Officer of the 7th Cavalry Regiment (Task Force 777), 1st Cavalry Division. Captain Webel distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces at Hambung-ni, Korea, on the night of 26 - 27 September 1950. As the leading elements of the task force entered the sleeping village of Hambung-ni, ninety-eight miles behind enemy lines, they were suddenly ambushed by a force of ten hostile T-34 tanks supported by foot troops. When the rapidly firing enemy tanks smashed the column, the outnumbered and outgunned men withdrew to the flanks to make their stand. As the ensuing battle raged fiercely in and near the village, Captain Webel, realizing that drastic action would be necessary to save the column, stepped out to destroy the leading tank. Suddenly swerving and almost overrunning its daring adversary, the enemy tank averted Captain Webel's attempt to climb aboard to drop grenades through an open periscope slot. Continuing to smash through the column, the tank swung off the road and into a rice field, gaining a more advantageous firing position. In the meantime, Captain Webel moved swiftly to a point opposite the tank's new location. Seeing the ineffectiveness of a group of men attempting to put the tank completely out of action by throwing grenades into an open hatch, he seized a five-gallon can of gasoline from the nearest vehicle, ran to the side of the tank, and after a comrade had failed to set fire to it by dashing gasoline on its sides, he climbed aboard. Knowing full well that an explosion might cost him his life, Captain Webel poured the gasoline through the ventilator over the hot engine; whereupon, in a burst of flame, he was blown approximately thirty feet through the air by the resultant blast. The lull provided by the spectacular destruction of the lead tank enabled the task force to reorganize. Disregarding shock, two broken ribs, and second-degree burns on his face and hands and, notwithstanding concentrated enemy fire that continuously swept the narrow streets, Captain Webel refused medical attention as he established cohesive defensive positions. Then, with a loaded bazooka, he proceeded to a point on the edge of the city where, from a range of approximately twenty-five yards, he fired alternately into two assaulting enemy tanks until they were destroyed. As enemy troops started withdrawing, Captain Webel dropped the bazooka and, from an exposed position on the road, opened fire with his submachine-gun. Then he again refused medical attention until all other wounded persons were treated.
General Headquarters Far East Command: General Orders No. 21 (February 3, 1951)

*WEBER, GERHARDT H.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Gerhardt H. Weber (0-60810), First Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company I, 3d Battalion, 24th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division. First Lieutenant Weber distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in near Haman, Korea, on 23 August 1950. On that date, Lieutenant Weber was leading his platoon in an assault upon an enemy held position which was supported by two machine-guns and artillery and mortar sections. Intense fire from the machine-guns, coupled with a heavy artillery and mortar barrage, caused the platoon to seek cover. Lieutenant Weber and five men continued to advance, but the enemy machine-gunner pinned them down. Determined to accomplish his mission, Lieutenant Weber continued to advance despite the deadly enemy fire. He was wounded by fragments from a grenade but he still kept going. He managed to maneuver to within five feet of one of the enemy machine-guns, and although wounded again, tossed a grenade into the enemy position, killing all of the crew. Two of his men reached him at this time and attempted to evacuate him, but an enemy mortar shell burst within five feet of the trio and fatally wounded Lieutenant Weber. Because of his inspiring actions and gallant sacrifice, the platoon was able to continue the assault and overrun the objective.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 18 (January 12, 1951), as amended by Section V of General Orders No. 46 (1951), HQ Eighth US Army Korea.
Home Town: Kings, New York

WEINSTEIN, JACK
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Jack Weinstein (US55055551), Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company G, 2d Battalion, 21st Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division. Sergeant Weinstein distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Kumsong, Korea, on 19 October 1951. On that date, Sergeant Weinstein was a member of a platoon that had just secured a strategic hill position from the enemy. As the friendly force began to consolidate their defenses, the numerically superior enemy launched a fierce counterattack to regain their lost positions. With most of the men of the platoon suffering wounds from the previous action, it became necessary for the friendly troops to execute a limited withdrawal. In order to provide covering fire for his comrades as they fell back, Sergeant Weinstein voluntarily remained in his position and continued to fire at the on-rushing enemy. After killing at least six of the attacking enemy with rifle fire, Sergeant Weinstein still refused to leave his position even though his ammunition was exhausted. Instead, gathering enemy grenades which lay near his emplacement, he hurled them at the hostile troops. Although painfully wounded, Sergeant Weinstein continued to inflict numerous casualties among the enemy, single-handedly holding the ground which his platoon had previously taken. He was still fighting fiercely when a friendly force moved forward and drove the enemy force from the objective.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 961 (December 3, 1951)
Home Town: Barton, Missouri

*WELSH, HARLEY
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Harley Welsh (US56099223), Corporal, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with an Infantry Company of the 15th Infantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division. Corporal Welsh distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Chiro- Dong, Korea, on 15 August 1952. On that date, Corporal Welsh's platoon was ordered to attack and secure an important enemy-held position. Corporal Welch was ordered to lead his squad in an encircling attack from the rear. Upon reaching the base of the objective, Corporal Welch and his squad charged the well-entrenched enemy, throwing grenades and directing accurate and deadly rifle fire into their ranks. When an enemy grenade landed a few feet from his position, Corporal Welch pushed one of his comrades aside, shouted a quick warning to the other members of the squad, and shifted his body to absorb the full impact of the grenade, sacrificing his life to save his companions.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 406 (April 21, 1953)
Home Town: Yuma, Arizona

*WENTZEL, DAVE W.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Dave W. Wentzel (RA27550994), Sergeant First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as Platoon Sergeant with an Infantry Company of the 8th Cavalry Regiment (Infantry), 1st Cavalry Division. Sergeant First Class Wentzel distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Sokkogae, Korea, on the night of 21 November 1951. On that date, Sergeant Wentzel was occupying an outpost position with his men when it was suddenly subjected to a fierce attack by approximately two battalions of the enemy. Without hesitation, he left his own position and made an immediate circuit of the entire defense perimeter, passing through intense enemy artillery, mortar, automatic-weapons, and small-arms fire to instruct his men. When the first wave of the assaulting enemy neared the outpost, Sergeant Wentzel moved along the top of the defensive positions, completely exposed to the hostile fire. His calmness under fire and his shouted words of encouragement gave the friendly troops the necessary courage to repel the assault. With the first attack repulsed, Sergeant Wentzel reorganized his men in anticipation for the next hostile assault and, although he was painfully wounded, he moved to other sections of the perimeter to coordinate the defense. Despite the fact that he was seriously weakened by his wound, Sergeant Wentzel, realizing that all available firepower was needed, refused to be evacuated and insisted on maintaining his own position. When the final enemy attack was launched, Sergeant Wentzel fearlessly leaped from his emplacement and killed six of the enemy with his carbine who were attempting to blast through the friendly barbed-wire entanglements with explosives. As he made his way back to his position, a hostile grenade exploded at his feet and killed him.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 183 (April 6, 1952)
Home Town: Mower, Minnesota

WESOLOWSKY, CHARLES L.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Charles L. Wesolowsky (0-28704), Captain (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with the United States Military Advisory Group, Korea. Captain Wesolowsky distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the Republic of Korea on 20 May 1951. Captain Wesolowsky was one of a group of United Nations personnel attempting to evade capture when they were suddenly subjected to heavy enemy fire which caused the withdrawal of the group. He and two companions remained in position and furnished covering fire. During this action, he fearlessly left his sheltered position to go to the aid of a companion who was pinned down by heavy automatic-weapons fire. Charging the enemy in a fierce, bold attack, he bayoneted the gunner and one other enemy soldier and forced the remaining enemy troops to disperse, thereby preventing the overrunning of the position. After the enemy fire had momentarily subsided, he ordered his two companions to withdraw to safety while he remained behind with a critically limited supply of ammunition and covered their withdrawal, fought off enemy patrols, and continued to destroy as many of the enemy as possible. Despite malnutrition and extreme fatigue from his arduous days behind enemy lines, he displayed superb courage against heavy odds in knowingly risking his life to allow his companions to escape unharmed.
Department of the Army: General Orders No. 107 (December 14, 1951)

WEST, HERMAN L.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Herman L. West, Captain (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as Commanding Officer of Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 2d Battalion, 7th Cavalry Regiment (Infantry), 1st Cavalry Division. Captain West distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces near Waegwan, Korea, on 7 September 1950. When his unit, almost surrounded by the enemy, received orders to withdraw to new positions under cover of darkness, Captain West improvised litters for his wounded and began the descent from the hill they occupied. Half way down heavy enemy artillery fire cut off the Company from other withdrawing units. During this barrage, Captain West received a painful back injury, but proceeded to re-form his Company and led it down another escape route. By making a personal reconnaissance despite his severe injury, he moved his company through three miles of enemy territory until dawn, when a brisk fight developed with the enemy on all sides. The company succeeded in driving off the enemy after killing a regimental commander and his staff and capturing valuable documents which disclosed friendly artillery positions known to the enemy. Proceeding toward a friendly unit, the company came under artillery and mortar fire which cut off the last platoon, which was carrying the wounded. Captain West, completely disregarding his own safety and the intense pain from his back injury, dashed 500 yards through the heavy fire to rally and move up the last platoon. When radio contact was made and the heavy shelling was found to be from friendly units, he dashed through the barrage a second time to radio and have the fire lifted. Only by his extremely courageous leadership and selfless disregard of his own safety and despite his injured condition, was Captain West's company, with its wounded, enabled to return to safety.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 204 (December 20, 1950), as amended by paragraph 3, Section III, of General Orders No. 121, HQ Eighth US Army Korea (1951)

WEST, HORACE W.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Horace W. West (0-2005251), Captain (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company A, 1st Battalion, 5th Regimental Combat Team, 1st Cavalry Division. Captain West distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Pisi-gol, Korea, on 25 April 1951. On that date, Company A was moving forward with a truck convoy when it was suddenly ambushed by a fanatical and numerically superior hostile force, supported by intense mortar, automatic-weapons and small-arms fire. Ordering his men to dismount from the vehicles, Captain West quickly reorganized them and led them in a daring assault against the well-entrenched enemy force occupying the ridgeline. Although painfully wounded in this action, he led his men forward again and again, inflicting heavy casualties among the enemy troops until the strategic disadvantages of the position held by the friendly force made it necessary for them to withdraw to the road. Immediately, Captain West deployed his men in a perimeter defense and constantly exposed himself to the intense enemy fire in order to move among his men with words of encouragement. Successfully coordinating the fire of his men and assisting in the evacuation of the wounded, Captain West's personal example of fearlessness inspired his troops to repulse the repeated assaults of the foe and inflict heavy casualties on them. Although growing weak from his wounds, he steadfastly remained with his men, instilling in them determination and confidence which enabled them to aggressively resist the on-rushing hostile troops until armor and infantry reinforcements were able to arrive and help rout the enemy.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 955 (December 1, 1951)
Home Town: Northampton, Pennsylvania

*WESTERMAN, SAMUEL V.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Samuel V. Westerman (0-968477), First Lieutenant (Field Artillery), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as a Forward Field Artillery Observer with Battery A, 38th Field Artillery Battalion, 2d Infantry Division. First Lieutenant Westerman distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces near Yong Byong Myon, Korea, on 28 November 1950. Surrounded by a numerically superior, ruthless foe and subjected to devastating hostile fire, Company A was committed to attack and consolidate on high ground. Lieutenant Westerman skillfully controlled artillery fire, enabling the infantry to advance, overrun enemy positions, and secure the strategic hill. Immediately following this action, Lieutenant Westerman assumed a forward vantage point exposed to enemy observation to direct fire on the threatened area, often brining it to within one hundred yards of his location. Later, the enemy launched a ferocious counterattack and Lieutenant Westerman participated in the encounter, fearlessly directing artillery power and firing his carbine and pistol. Engaging in bitter fighting and close hand-to-hand combat, the friendly forces fought tenaciously but, in the face of overwhelming odds, withdrew and yielded the key terrain. Struck by a hostile bullet, Lieutenant Westerman was given first aid but refused evacuation and returned to the unit. When the company again assaulted the strongpoint, through expert direction of artillery support, he laid down a curtain of withering fire in front of the advancing infantry. After retaking the commanding ground, Lieutenant Westerman returned to his original position and directed continuous concentrations of fire, stopping only to assist in the evacuation of the wounded. The friendly unit held through three fanatical attacks and when ordered to withdraw, Lieutenant Westerman remained with the rear guard to provide protective fire for the orderly withdrawal of the company.
General Headquarters Far East Command: General Orders No. 196 (July 29, 1951)

WESTON, LOGAN E.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Logan E. Weston (0-1795021), Captain (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as Commanding Officer of Company A, 1st Battalion, 27th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division. Captain Weston distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces at Chindong-ni, Korea, on 4 August 1950. On that date the 1st Battalion command post was attacked by a numerically superior enemy forces. During this action Captain Weston, without regard for his own personal safety, assaulted two enemy machine- guns on the crest of a hill and eliminated them with fire from an M-1 rifle. During this action he was wounded in the thigh, but after he received first aid he refused to be evacuated and returned to his unit. By his personal bravery he encouraged his men to repel the enemy attack. In a later action he was wounded twice but despite his three wounds refused to be evacuated.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 68 (September 15, 1950)
Home Town: Lawrence, Pennsylvania

WESTON, RALPH W.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Ralph W. Weston (ER16304621), Private First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company A, 1st Battalion, 19th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division. Private First Class Weston distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces near Sesim-ni, Korea, on 3 and 4 February 1951. On those dates, Company A was in defensive positions covering the withdrawal of a friendly unit. As the unit completed its withdrawal, the enemy launched a tremendous mass attack against the company. Private Weston was situated on a commanding knoll where the hostile troops were concentrating their attack. As the enemy approached, Private Weston laid down such accurate and voluminous fire that his immediate sector was soon swept clear. He then delivered enfiladed fire on enemy soldiers who were approaching other areas, providing effective support for friendly troops in those sectors. Although wounded by mortar fire during this first attack, Private Weston, refusing to be evacuated, remained in position and repulsed the second and third attacks with his devastating machine-gun fire. Again wounded during the third attack, he held his position and when the enemy started another attack Sergeant Weston continued to rake them with machine-gun fire, repelling them for the fourth time. During this action, he received his third wound but continued to remain at his machine-gun until he was carried from the position by his comrades. As a result of his dauntless action, fifty enemy soldiers were killed and the company was able to hold its defensive positions.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 456 (June 24, 1951)
Home Town: St. Clair, Illinois

*WETZEL, EUGENE V.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Eugene V. Wetzel (RA13393309), Corporal, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company E, 2d Battalion, 224th Infantry Regiment, 40th Infantry Division. Corporal Wetzel distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces at the "Punch Bowl" in Korea, on 24 May 1953. On that date, Corporal Wetzel voluntarily accompanied a contingent assigned the mission of apprehending an enemy who had been sighted in the vicinity. As the patrol neared an allied listening post, acting as point man, he observed a hostile force lying in ambush. Disregarding personal safety, he charged forward, killing one and wounding four of the foe. Corporal Wetzel was mortally wounded in this action, but seeing an enemy soldier preparing to throw a grenade, he killed the man with his rifle, then threw himself on the lethal missile to protect his comrades from the explosion. Seconds later he lost consciousness from his wounds and remained unaware that because of the enemy's inability to release the firing pin the grenade failed to detonate.
Department of the Army: General Orders No. 84 (November 3, 1953)
Home Town: Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

*WHITE, DAVID N.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to David N. White (0-2021082), First Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company G, 2d Battalion, 187th Airborne Regimental Combat Team, 11th Airborne Division. First Lieutenant White distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Wonju, Korea, on 15 February 1951. On that date, Lieutenant White was leading his platoon in an attack against a strongly fortified enemy occupying positions on the topographical crest and reverse slope of Hill 342. As the platoon approached the forward slope of the hill, the leading element was halted and the platoon pinned down by accurate, intense machine-gun and small arms fire. After spotting the nearest machine-gun, he crawled over open terrain, exposed to enemy observation and fire, to a point within twenty yards of the gun position and opened fire with his carbine, killing the crew and silencing the weapon. When a second machine-gun located approximately fifty years away opened fire on him, wounding him in the chest, he crawled to within fifteen yards of the gun emplacement and, despite his wounds, succeeded in destroying the gun with a phosphorous grenade. While in the act of destroying this second machine-gun, he was mortally wounded and died at this position.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 318 (May 17, 1951)
Home Town: Lee, Florida

*WHITE, EDWARD ANSEL
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Edward Ansel White (0-57152), First Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company F, 2d Battalion, 5th Cavalry Regiment (Infantry), 1st Cavalry Division. First Lieutenant White distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces near Kumchon, Korea, on 2 August 1950. On that date, Lieutenant White was in command of an outpost comprising eleven men when an enemy force of two platoons launched a pre-dawn attack. In the face of overwhelming odds, Lieutenant White calmly withheld the order to fire until the enemy approached within twenty-five yards, then his outpost delivered such devastating fire from small arms and grenades that thirty of the enemy were killed. During this action the outpost expended nearly all of its ammunition and Lieutenant White, although the road was swept for machine-gun fire, drove a jeep to the rear for more ammunition. Obtaining the ammunition, he started back through the concentrated enemy fire. During the return trip First Lieutenant White was killed.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 55 (September 7, 1950)
Home Town: Monterey, California

WHITE, MILLARD C.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Millard C. White (0-544863), First Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company B, 1st Battalion, 15th Infantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division. First Lieutenant White distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Sobangsan, Korea, on 23 June 1951. On that date, Lieutenant White's company was engaged in an assault against Hill 717, which was being defended by a fanatically determined and well-entrenched force. As Lieutenant White led his platoon toward the objective, the men were forced to seek cover when of a heavy volume of mortar, small-arms and automatic-weapons fire was concentrated on them from the hostile emplacements. Realizing that his men faced annihilation in untenable positions, Lieutenant White, with complete disregard for his personal safety, charged across the fire-swept terrain toward the key enemy emplacement. On the way, he was painfully wounded by fragments from a bursting mortar shell; but despite this, he crawled to within a few yards of the enemy position and succeeded in neutralizing the hostile weapon and killing its crew with grenades. As a result of his courageous action, the hostile troops withdrew from the crest of the hill, enabling the friendly forces to secure their objective. Lieutenant White immediately set about organizing his men in a perimeter defense against the enemy counterattack which was sure to come. When the enemy charged up the slope they were met by a devastating volume of fire from the friendly forces. Accounting for many of the enemy dead himself, Lieutenant White constantly moved among his men, encouraging them and directing their fire. His example of courage so inspired his men that they succeeded in beating off the enemy attack and held the hill. The extraordinary heroism and complete selfless devotion to duty displayed by Lieutenant White throughout this action reflect great credit on himself and are in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 715 (September 22, 1951)
Home Town: Warwick, Virginia

WHITLATCH, GLEN L.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Glen L. Whitlatch (RA15410462), Corporal, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company D, 1st Battalion, 15th Infantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division. Corporal Whitlatch distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Suso-ri, Korea, on 13 February 1951. On that date, while moving from Suso-ri to occupy the high ground north of the village, Company D was suddenly and fiercely attacked by an estimated enemy battalion, As the attack commenced, Corporal Whitlatch left his concealed position to run through the deadly hail of fire to his jeep on which was mounted a heavy machine-gun. From this exposed and hazardous position he delivered accurate, withering fire into the enemy ranks, halting the initial assault and killing approximately 39 hostile troops. Taking advantage of a temporary lull in the fighting, Corporal Whitlatch obtained a tripod for his weapon; then, as he started toward a selected firing position, the enemy launched a second banzai charge at the friendly position. Immediately placing his gun in action, he stopped this charge only twenty yards from his position. During this action, Corporal Whitlatch received a serious head wound caused by fragments from an enemy grenade. Refusing to relinquish his gun and return to the aid station for medical attention, he remained in position throughout the ensuing five hour battle, placing effective machine-gun fire on the enemy and preventing the friendly positions from being overrun.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 388 (June 2, 1951)
Home Town: Marshall, West Virginia

*WIGHTMAN, JAMES M.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to James M. Wightman (RA14008591), Master Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as a Platoon Sergeant with Company E, 2d Battalion, 17th Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division. Master Sergeant Wightman distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Twi-got, Korea, on 9 March 1951. Sergeant Wightman led his men in an attack against numerically superior enemy forces who were well-entrenched on Hill 1232 near Twi-got. Nearing the objective, the platoon came under intense enemy automatic-weapons and small-arms fire and was pinned down. Moving among his men, Sergeant Wightman encouraged them to increase their rate of fire and then led them in an assault on the hill. Locating a machine-gun position that was placing withering fire on his platoon, Sergeant Wightman single-handedly assaulted the gun emplacement, thereby drawing enemy fire on himself so that his platoon could advance. In assaulting the machine-gun position, he was hit by a burst of fire and killed; however, his heroic act enabled the platoon to close with the enemy and seize the objective.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 364 (May 28, 1951)
Home Town: Lexington, South Carolina

*WILBUR, WILLIAM HALE
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to William Hale Wilbur (0-59308), Second Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 3d Battalion, 8th Cavalry Regiment (Infantry), 1st Cavalry Division. Second Lieutenant Wilbur distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces near Tabu-dong, Korea, on 3 September 1950. From the 28th of August 1950, when he joined the Eighth Cavalry Regiment, Lieutenant Wilbur continually volunteered for extra hazardous duties, leading several combat and reconnaissance patrols deep into enemy territory and securing important information as to enemy gun emplacements and troop dispositions. On the morning of 4 September 1950, Company I was given the mission of halting the enemy's advance by cutting the road north of Tabu-dong, even though the village and terrain to their rear was held by the enemy. Realizing the necessity of clearing the enemy from the village, Lieutenant Wilbur volunteered to lead a thirty-man patrol into it. Although continually harassed by enemy small arms fire, he succeeded in clearing a sector. Then, despite the heavy enemy small arms and machine-gun fire, he aggressively led his patrol to the far side of the town where they successfully recovered and evaluated a seriously wounded man. While clearing out the remainder of the village, Lieutenant Wilbur skillfully directed his patrol in repelling an enemy attack, killing six. When the enemy, approximately seventy-five in number, launched a second attack and nearly overwhelmed his troops, he called for artillery fire upon his own position and broke up the hostile force, allowing his patrol to withdraw to his company's position. His courage, initiative, and superior leadership were largely responsible for Company I successfully withstanding successive attacks of an enemy in vastly numerical strength over a period of three days. He constantly exposed himself to intense enemy fire, and on 5 September 1950, was mortally wounded.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 14 (January 8, 1951)
Home Town: Lake, Illinois

WILKES, HERBERT
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Herbert Wilkes (RA34517144), Sergeant First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Battery B, 63d Field Artillery Battalion, 24th Infantry Division. Sergeant First Class Wilkes distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces near Chonan, Korea, on 8 July 1950. On that date, the battery position of Battery B received extremely heavy fire from enemy tanks and artillery. The rate of fire was so intense that personnel of the battery became disorganized. Seeing this, Sergeant First Class Wilkes, without regard for his personal safety, exposed himself to the intense fire and personally organized each howitzer section so that counter battery fire could be delivered. Due to his heroic action and aggressive leadership, the battery was able to return the enemy fire and in addition deliver concentrated fire on the town of Chonan to protect the withdrawal of an American infantry battalion.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 50 (September 3, 1950)
Home Town: Florence, South Carolina

WILLIAMS, BILLIE F.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Billie F. Williams, Master Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with an Infantry Company of the 32d Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division. Master Sergeant Williams distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Kumhwa, Korea, on 16 October 1953. On that date, Sergeant Williams was participating in an assault on a strategic enemy-held hill. When all of the officers in his company became casualties in the intense fighting, Sergeant Williams assumed command. Continually exposing himself to the heavy concentration of enemy fire, Sergeant Williams led the men in a spirited charge which was greatly responsible for the ultimate withdrawal of the enemy. When the objective had been secured, Sergeant Williams immediately set up an effective defense perimeter and deployed his force in the most advantageous positions to meet the anticipated counter-attacks. During the ensuing action Sergeant Williams was informed that an enemy force was organizing to the rear of his position. Rallying his men, Sergeant Williams led them in an assault on the enemy element and, through his leadership and skillful fire direction, the threat of an attack from the rear was neutralized.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 658 (July 16, 1953)

WILLIAMS, HARRY O.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Harry O. Williams, Captain (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company K, 3d Battalion, 7th Infantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division. Captain Williams distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Chom-Chon, Korea, on 12 February 1951. Captain Williams was leading a reinforced patrol toward the Han River when the unit encountered intense small-arms, automatic weapons, and mortar fire from a numerically superior enemy well entrenched on commanding terrain. Immediately deploying his men to meet the attack, he directed one squad to move to the left flank of the enemy and a second squad to move to the right flank in an effort to encircle the enemy positions. Shortly thereafter, he observed that the squad moving to the right had encountered intense enemy fire and was pinned down. Moving to the squad's position, he found that the squad leader had advanced to a position approximately five yards from an enemy machine-gun and had been wounded and pinned down by machine-gun fire. Determined to rescue the wounded man, Captain Williams charged the machine-gun position with grenades and carbine and succeeded in destroying the weapon and killing the crew. Despite the continued hail of small- arms fire, he reached the wounded squad leader but found the man was unable to move. Picking the man up, Captain Williams moved with him across approximately fifty yards of open fire-swept terrain to the position of the patrol where, after administering first aid to the wounded man, he continued to direct the operations of the patrol until orders were received to withdraw.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 396 (June 3, 1951)

WILLIAMS, SAMUEL T.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Samuel T. Williams, Major General, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as Commanding General of the 25th Infantry Division. Major General Williams distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Chu-Dong, Korea, on the morning of 15 July 1953. On that date, General Williams was advised of a large-scale enemy attack consisting of six hostile divisions and extending the width of the corps front. He immediately contacted all available sources of information in an effort to coordinate the defense. The reports he received were confused because of the scope of the battle, and General Williams realized that only through personal observation would he be able to secure the data he needed. Consequently, he flew in a helicopter to the scene of the battle. Dipping repeatedly to within a few feet of the hostile positions, General Williams noted the disposition of the foe without regard for the heavy fire directed against his craft. At one point, a bullet ripped through the plastic canopy of the helicopter, narrowly missing him. However, even this did not cause him to turn back. Instead, he passed again and again over the battle area until satisfied that he had gathered sufficient information upon which to base an effective defense. Only then did he return to his command post to plan and coordinate a counter operation which substantially reduced the fighting potential of the hostile force through the tremendous casualties they suffered.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 710 (July 30, 1953)

*WILLIAMS, STANLEY R.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Stanley R. Williams (RA13349750), Sergeant First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company E, 2d Battalion, 23d Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division. Sergeant First Class Williams distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Chorwon, Korea, on 18 July 18 1952. On that date, the company in which Sergeant First Class Williams served was attacking heavily fortified enemy positions on a tactically important hill. As the friendly force advanced, it was exposed to intense hostile artillery and mortar bombardment which, combined with a vicious fusillade of enemy small-arms fire, pinned the friendly infantrymen down on an exposed slope leading to their objective. Realizing that his unit would suffer heavy casualties if it remained in its present position, Sergeant Williams charged alone into the murderous fire pouring from the hostile entrenchment. Reaching the crest of the hill, he shouted for his men to come forward. As they advanced to joint him, he moved about through the intense enemy fire in order to point out places of cover for the members of his platoon. Painfully wounded, he saw that the numerically superior foe could not be dislodged by his small force, and ordered his men to move back. Refusing evacuation, he remained behind in order to cover their withdrawal and direct intense and accurate fire on the enemy until he succumbed from his wounds. His gallant self-sacrifice enabled his men to reach friendly line with safety.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 718 (November 22, 1952)
Home Town: Kanawha, West Virginia

WILLIAMS, WILLIAM R.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to William R. Williams, Captain (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with the United States Military Advisory Group, Korea, deployed as Advisor to the 3d Battalion, 23rd Regiment, Republic of Korea Army. Captain Williams distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces near Yongdok, Korea, on 31 July 1950. On that date, the attack of the 3d Battalion had been stopped by a numerically superior enemy force and the battalion was disorganized and started falling back. At this critical time, Captain Williams, acting promptly and decisively, moved forward under heavy enemy fire, effected the rapid reorganization of the unit, and reestablished the lines. Calling for artillery fire, Captain Williams found that no observer was available. He then took a radio to the exposed crest of Hill 151, where he directed artillery fire on the enemy positions. Soon after establishing his observation post, Captain Williams was discovered by the enemy, who placed incessant artillery fire on his position. With complete disregard for his personal safety, Captain Williams remained at his position and continued to adjust fire in an artillery duel lasting for a period of one hour and fifteen minutes. During this time, he repeatedly exposed himself to enemy sniper and artillery fire while moving about for better observation. Through his efforts, he succeeded in eliminating the enemy forward observation post and in silencing the enemy artillery fire. As the attack resumed, Captain Williams then discovered an enemy group holding up the advance of a forward company of the Battalion. Because of the mountainous terrain, artillery fire could be placed on this strongpoint only by shifting battery positions. Realizing that immediate action was necessary, Captain Williams secured a .50 caliber machine-gun, and with two ammunition bearers, returned to Hill 151. Although observed and under intense small-arms and mortar fire, Captain Williams continued for forty-five minutes to attack the enemy group by machine-gun fire until it was dispersed and the Republic of Korea company was able to secure its objective.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 175 (November 17, 1950)

WILSON, BENJAMIN F.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Benjamin F. Wilson, Master Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company I, 3d Battalion, 31st Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division. Master Sergeant Wilson distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Nodong-ni, Korea, on 9 June 1951. On that date, Sergeant Wilson's company was advancing against heavily fortified enemy hill positions when a sudden and heavy volume of small-arms and automatic-weapons fire forced the men to seek cover. Sergeant Wilson, realizing the need for immediate and aggressive action so that the men could extricate themselves from their untenable positions, charged forward against the enemy emplacements single-handedly, firing his rifle rapidly and pitching grenades. Completely exposed to the concentrated fire of the enemy, he nevertheless succeeded in killing four of the enemy and in neutralizing a hostile bunker. His heroic actions so inspired his men that they renewed their assault and secured the objective. Immediately, the enemy launched a fierce counterattack against the newly gained positions and Sergeant Wilson once more left his position and engaged them at extremely close range. He personally killed five of the attacking enemy and laid down such a devastating volume of fire that the remainder were forced to withdraw after suffering heavy losses.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 694 (September 12, 1951)
Born: June 2, 1922 at Vashon, Washington
Home Town: Vashon, Washington
Other Award: Medal of Honor (Korea)

WILSON, JAMES P.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to James P. Wilson, Second Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company B, 1st Battalion, 27th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division. Second Lieutenant Wilson distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces near Chin-Dong- ni, Korea, on 20 September 1950. On that date, Company B was assigned the mission of taking a hill on which the enemy had well-prepared positions. Although wounded in the face by enemy shell fragments, Lieutenant Wilson refused medical aid and personally led his platoon on three assaults of the enemy's position. With utter disregard for his personal safety, Lieutenant Wilson charged up the slopes under an intense volume of enemy machine-gun, grenade, and rifle fire; he closed with the enemy and, in hand-to-hand combat, killed three of them. His undaunted courage and determination so inspired his men that they completely overran the enemy position.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 68 (February 12, 1951)

WILSON, NORMAN E.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Norman E. Wilson (US56111054), Private First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company M, 3d Battalion, 5th Cavalry Regiment (Infantry), 1st Cavalry Division. Private First Class Wilson distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Tokchol-li, Korea, on 6 September 1951. On that date, the friendly forces were occupying a patrol base that had been surrounded and was undergoing an attack by elements of three enemy regiments. Although wounded in the initial assault, Private Wilson refused medical aid and steadfastly remained at his post, delivering a devastating volume of machine-gun fire into the charging enemy's ranks. During lulls in the attack, he fearlessly exposed himself to heavy enemy mortar and artillery fire to obtain re-supplies of ammunition for his weapon. Although wounded twice more by small-arms fire, Private Wilson still refused to be evacuated, and when his platoon executed a limited withdrawal, he voluntarily remained in his position to cover his comrades as they fell back. At this time he noticed three friendly riflemen in an isolated position. Immediately, he attracted the attention of the hostile force and by causing the enemy fire to be concentrated on him, enabled the three men to crawl to safety. In this action, Private Wilson succeeded in neutralizing two hostile automatic-weapons and killing approximately twenty-five enemy soldiers.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 772 (October 16, 1951)
Home Town: Canyon, Idaho

WILSON, VENARD
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Venard Wilson, Brigadier General, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as Assistant Division Commander of the 25th Infantry Division. Brigadier General Wilson distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the Republic of Korea from 22 July to 5 October 1950. During this period General Wilson courageously and repeatedly risked his life in the execution of his duties. He was often at the front advising and encouraging battalion and company commanders, and at times, platoon and squad leaders. On 23 July 1950, in the vicinity of Sangju, Korea, while two platoons of infantry were in ditches at the side of a road covered by enemy fire, General Wilson, without regard for his personal safety, walked down the road and directed a sergeant to take his squad and clean out a small village in the rear from which the enemy fire was believed to be coming. The squad moved to the edge of the area and hit the ground. General Wilson went to the squad and by his example of personal courage enabled the sergeant and his men to enter and secure the village. On 25 September 1950, when Task Force Tarman was held up at the Man Gang River, east of Chinju, Korea, and the Task Force commander was seriously wounded, General Wilson took charge of the crossing. Under heavy enemy small-arms and mortar fire, he personally reconnoitered the crossing site, organized the crossing, and continued on to direct operations during the assault and movement of the lead elements. On 16 September 1950, near Sachan-ni, Korea, while he was at the joint command post of companies L and F, 35th Infantry Regiment, two hundred rounds of enemy artillery and mortar fire fell on the position over a two hour period. Under this terrific fire, General Wilson's calmness and valuable advice resulted in the successful launching of an attack by Company L. The extraordinary heroism displayed by General Wilson during the mentioned period aided immeasurably in the accomplishment of the combat mission of the 25th Infantry Division
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 136 (October 26, 1950)

*WINSTEAD, OTHO T.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Otho T. Winstead (0-44345), Lieutenant Colonel (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as Commanding Officer of the 1st Battalion, 19th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division. Lieutenant Colonel Winstead distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces at Taepyong-hi, Korea, on 15 and 16 July 1950. When his positions were under constant and severe artillery, heavy weapons and sniper fire, Colonel Winstead remained constantly in his most forward infantry positions for the purpose of directing counter-fire and to inspire and calm his officers and men by his own personal fearless and daring example. On 16 July 1950, when his positions were subject to attack from the front, the flanks and from the rear by a vastly numerically superior enemy, Colonel Winstead personally led a counterattack against a group of infiltrating enemy who were threatening to disrupt the orderly withdrawal of his unit to new defensive positions, killing at leas two of them with his pistol at point-bank range. He remained at the battle positions with the last element of his unit and when last seen was calmly directing its preparations for withdrawal.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 24 (August 12, 1950), as amended by General Orders No. 342 HQ Eighth US Army Korea(1951)
Home Town: Hinds, Mississippi

WISEMORE, ROYAL A.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Royal A. Wisemore, Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as a Medical Aidman with Company I, 3d Battalion, 5th Cavalry Regiment (Infantry), 1st Cavalry Division. Sergeant Wisemore distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Kasan, Korea, on 28 November 1950. On that date, Company I's defensive positions were attacked by a numerically superior enemy force supported by intense artillery and mortar fire. Working tirelessly, Sergeant Wisemore moved among the friendly troops, giving medical aid to the many wounded. As the battle raged, enemy troops infiltrated the friendly defenses and Sergeant Wisemore, in order to evacuate the seriously wounded, was forced to move across terrain occupied by the enemy. Although it meant exposing himself to the concentrated fire of the hostile force, Sergeant Wisemore evacuated two men in this manner. After moving these men to positions of safety, he returned to Company I's defense line and found a man with a badly wounded foot. Upon attempting to carry him to the rear, Sergeant Wisemore found that the route was cut off by the enemy. He then carried the wounded man toward a road which he had observed earlier. Upon reaching the road, he found two men, who were cut off from the friendly forces which had withdrawn to a new defense line, engaged in a fierce firefight with the enemy. Joining them in a position which was subjected to the concentrated fire of the enemy, Sergeant Wisemore used his own body to shield the wounded man from the many enemy grenades being hurled at them. As Sergeant Wisemore and his comrades distracted the enemy, the wounded man attempted to drag himself to safety. After remaining in their position for twenty minutes, the men, believing that the wounded man had reached the friendly lines, withdrew through the surrounding enemy to the new defense perimeter. As they reached a position of comparative safety, Sergeant Wisemore heard the wounded man, who had not been able to reach the friendly lines, call for help. Unhesitatingly, he rushed back across the fire-swept terrain and carried him to cover.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 875 (November 11, 1951)

WONG, WILLIAM E.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to William E. Wong (RA39033506), Sergeant First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as a Squad Leader with Company K, 3d Battalion, 7th Infantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division. Sergeant First Class Wong distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Chom-Chon, Korea, on 12 February 1951. On that date, Sergeant Wong was leading his squad in a reconnaissance patrol when they became engaged in a fierce firelight with a strongly entrenched enemy force on Hill 88. After he had maneuvered his squad into an assault position, he single-handedly charged an enemy machine-gun that was delivering withering fire on his squad. He was wounded twice in this action, but showing fearless perseverance, he continued to close in on the position in the face of the savage enemy fire until, wounded the third time, he fell to the ground. Weak from loss of blood and his arduous efforts, Sergeant Wong lay in an exposed area until finally rescued by his patrol leader. Sergeant Wong's comrades, inspired by his gallant actions, charged the hostile positions and successfully routed the enemy.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 570 (July 21, 1951)
Home Town: San Francisco, California

*WOO, THEODORE R.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Theodore R. Woo (0-2202513), Second Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as a Platoon Leader in Company E, 2d Battalion, 5th Cavalry Regiment (Infantry), 1st Cavalry Division. Second Lieutenant Woo distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces at Mago-ri, Korea, on 3 October 1951. On that date, Lieutenant Woo led his platoon to the company's objective under intense mortar and small-arms fire. In the initial assault, he outdistanced his leading elements and knocked out an enemy bunker. Although wounded in the arm, he left the hill, reorganized the platoon, and again led them to the objective. Before he could organize to hold the captured hill, a powerful enemy counterattack struck the position. Lieutenant Woo was again wounded, the platoon's ammunition was exhausted, and its withdrawal become necessary. While he was courageously directing the withdrawal and the evacuation of the wounded, he was killed by an enemy mortar shell.
Department of the Army: General Orders No. 89 (October 3, 1952)
Home Town: Kanawha, West Virginia

*WOOD, MARVIN R.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Marvin R. Wood (RA19322364), Corporal, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as a Medical Aidman with the 13th Engineer Combat Battalion, 17th Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division. Corporal Wood distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces at Soju-ri, Korea, on 17 November 1950. On that date, Corporal Wood's platoon was moving out into a narrow valley affording little cover when the enemy opened a violent cross-fire which resulted in many casualties to his unit. With utter disregard for his personal safety, he moved about in the heavy hostile fire, attending the wounded, and assisting in their evacuation. As he dashed through vicious cross-fire toward a wounded man approximately one hundred yards away, he was wounded by concentrated fire and knocked to the ground. Crawling the remaining twenty-five yards to the wounded man, he unhesitatingly sat astride the back of his patient and administered first aid. He was again wounded and knocked from the wounded man's back, but returned to his position and again attempted to administer first aid. He was struck for the third time and fell mortally wounded alongside his comrade.
Department of the Army: General Orders No. 50 (July 16, 1951)
Home Town: Clearwater, Idaho

WOOD, STEVEN H.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Steven H. Wood (0-1935523), Second Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with an Infantry Company of the 17th Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division. Second Lieutenant Wood distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Sokkogae, Korea, on 8 July 1953. On that date, Lieutenant Wood was the leader of a group attempting to reinforce an outpost which was under attack. When his unit was pinned down by fire from an enemy bunker, Lieutenant Wood advanced on the position alone and killed eight of its occupants through the accurate use of grenades and his pistol. Although wounded by a grenade, Lieutenant Wood proceeded to another bunker and freed five United Nations soldiers who had been trapped by an explosion. Encouraging and inspiring his men, Lieutenant Wood then continued to lead the advance and successfully established a perimeter of defense on the crest of a hill before again being wounded by an enemy grenade. With complete disregard for his personal safety, he fearlessly exposed himself to an intense barrage of fire, hurled grenades into an enemy-occupied trench to his front, and forced the enemy to evacuate the position. Seeing the enemy move into the open, Lieutenant Wood immediately directed effective fire which killed twelve of them. When his force was finally ordered to withdraw, he quickly called in accurate artillery fire on the enemy positions and prevented the enemy from bringing up reinforcements.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 998 (November 9, 1953)
Home Town: Monmouth, New Jersey

WOODSIDE, WILLIAM W.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to William W. Woodside, First Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as Commanding Officer of Company L, 3d Battalion, 7th Cavalry Regiment (Task Force 777), 1st Cavalry Division. First Lieutenant Woodside distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces at Hambung-ni, Korea, n the night of 26 - 27 September 1950.0. On 26 September 1950, Lieutenant Woodside moved northward in a motor column to link with other United Nations elements in Korea. Shortly after midnight as the column entered the town of Hambung-ni, ninety-eight miles behind enemy lines, it was suddenly ambushed by ten enemy T-34 tanks with infantry support. In the pitch darkness and under an intense hail of machine-gun and tank cannon fire, Lieutenant Woodside quickly organized a group of four enlisted men, armed with grenades, and led them against a tank. Reaching the tank, he hurled grenades into the open hatch until the crew was silenced, enabling final destruction by a comrade who poured gasoline into the hot engine, causing the tank to explode. Moving quickly to the front of the column, reorganizing the confused troops as he went, he led them into the thick of the fighting. He then assisted in destroying a tank that had smashed through the head of the column and then, standing in an exposed position approximately twenty yards form enemy foot soldiers, he fired his carbine with such fearless tenacity that they dispersed wildly. At daybreak, after the enemy tanks had withdrawn, a hostile machine-gun crew opened intense fire on the column. Unhesitatingly, again with complete disregard for his life, Lieutenant Woodside led two men in a spectacular charge, overrunning the position and killing the crew. First Lieutenant Woodside, through his tenacious intrepidity, sustained courage, and inspiring gallantry contributed materially to the successful counterattack of the enemy ambush and continuation of the column's movement to accomplish its objective.
General Headquarters Far East Command: General Orders No. 21 (February 3, 1951)

WOOLLEY, EARL K.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Earl K. Woolley (0-2014809), First Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company G, 3d Battalion, 187th Airborne Regimental Combat Team, 11th Airborne Division. First Lieutenant Woolley distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Parun-ni, Korea, on 28 March 1951. On that date Company G was assigned the mission of attacking Hills 507 and 519, two strongpoints held by a well-entrenched hostile force. In the ensuing action, Lieutenant Woolley led his platoon in a bayonet and grenade assault against the enemy positions. Despite the heavy volume of hostile fire, Lieutenant Woolley took up a position at the head of his men and began hurling grenades at the hostile positions. The enemy troops then began to barrage the friendly platoon with grenades. With complete disregard for his personal safety, Lieutenant Woolley picked up several enemy grenades that landed near his position and threw them among the hostile troops, inflicting heavy casualties. Although painfully wounded by an exploding grenade, he nevertheless led his men forward and closed with the enemy in hand-to-hand combat, successfully securing Hill 507. Refusing evacuation, Lieutenant Woolley was placed in charge of the weapons platoon as the remainder of the company launched an attack against Hill 519, the second phase of the mission. Upon observing that the route of attack was under intense enemy automatic-weapons fire, he immediately organized his platoon, consisting of eleven men, and, supported by machine-gun and mortar fire, led an assault against the hostile emplacements. In this action, two enemy machine-guns were destroyed and twenty-five of the enemy were killed. When four of his men were wounded, Lieutenant Woolley deployed the remaining seven in a perimeter defense and held an important terrain feature until relieved by another unit at dusk.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 820 (October 24, 1951)
Home Town: Uintah, Utah

*WRIGHT, GEORGE M.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to George M. Wright (0-1688695), First Lieutenant (Corps of Engineers), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as a Platoon Leader with Company B, 65th Engineer Combat Battalion, 25th Infantry Division. First Lieutenant Wright distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces at Taeson-Myon, Korea, on 14 September 1950. Lieutenant Wright was leading his platoon in an attack against a strongly defended enemy position. One platoon had already lost all its non-commissioned officers and officers, either killed or wounded, and Lieutenant Wright assumed leadership over the group and placed them in his platoon. Although seriously wounded in the leg, he continued to lead the men forward in the face of heavy enemy fire, destroying machine- gun position with a grenade and shouting words of encouragement to the men under his control. By his courage and devotion to duty, he so inspired his men that they continued and captured the final objective from the enemy after he himself had been mortally wounded while trying to throw another grenade.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 54 (February 6, 1951)
Home Town: Blue Earth, Minnesota

WURST, HOWARD C.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Howard C. Wurst, Sergeant First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company A, 1st Battalion, 8th Cavalry Regiment (Infantry), 1st Cavalry Division. Sergeant First Class Wurst distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Chung-myon, Korea, on 14 July 1951. On that date, Sergeant Wurst was placed in charge of an ambush patrol in an outpost position with the mission of checking any enemy attempts to attack the battalion's patrol base. In the early morning hours a squad of hostile troops launched a surprise assault and succeeded in overrunning the patrol's machine-gun emplacement. Observing this, Sergeant Wurst charged the enemy-held position in a fearless, single-handed assault, firing his carbine and hurling grenades. This sudden and aggressive action caused the enemy troops to withdraw from the emplacement and Sergeant Wurst immediately called to his men to move forward and reoccupy the position. While the friendly forces were still in the process of setting up their defenses, they were again attacked, this time from the front and both flanks, by an estimated two companies of the enemy. Quickly, Sergeant Wurst organized his men, put the machine-gun in operating condition, and deployed his forces for an effective defense. Despite the heavy volume of enemy fire concentrated on him, Sergeant Wurst repeatedly moved form position to position across the exposed terrain, calming and encouraging his men and directing their fire. He then called for friendly mortar and artillery support by radio and directed fire against the enemy with such devastating precision that the attack was broken and the hostile troops were forced to withdraw with many casualties.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 738 (October 1, 1951)

WYNN, ELLISON
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Ellison Wynn (0-1303423), First Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company B, 1st Battalion, 9th Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division. First Lieutenant Wynn distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces near Kunu-ri, Korea, on 25 November 1950. On that date, Company B was attacking a hill consisting of three knolls occupied by the enemy. As each knoll fell under the company's relentless attack, the enemy withdrew until they were in considerable force when the attack on the last knoll was made. During the attack on this knoll the company commander was wounded and Lieutenant Wynn, assuming command, led his troops in the final assault and routed the enemy. While preparing to pursue the retreating forces, an estimated two companies of enemy counterattacked from an adjacent hill. During this fierce counterattack, the machine-gun section with Lieutenant Wynn was knocked out and the gunner and his assistant were killed. Remaining alone on the hill, Lieutenant Wynn held off the enemy by throwing grenades until his men joined him in defending the position. Although bleeding profusely from wounds he had received, he staunchly directed the defense of his position until the battalion commander ordered a withdrawal.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 221 (April 19, 1951)
Home Town: Suffolk, Massachusetts

Y

YODA, HENRY H.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Henry H. Yoda (RA10104632), Sergeant First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as a Squad Leader in Company A, 1st Battalion, 15th Infantry Regiment, 15th Infantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division. Sergeant First Class Yoda distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Chorwon, Korea, on 29 September 1951. On that date, Sergeant Yoda's company was engaged in an attack against a hostile force occupying heavily fortified bunkers on a strategic slope. The friendly troops managed to destroy four of the enemy positions, but the fifth, a strong bunker, which was the key to the enemy defense system, poured such a devastating volume of fire into the ranks of the advancing troops that they were pinned down. Repeated assaults by special demolition and flame thrower teams failed to dislodge the hostile troops. Realizing the attack would fail unless immediate and aggressive action was taken, Sergeant Yoda led his squad through the pinned-down lead elements and attacked the bunker frontally. A shower of enemy grenades halted the squad, but Sergeant Yoda, taking the initiative, fired two rocket grenades which scored direct hits. Under cover of the confusion created by the explosions, he advanced on the bunker and began hurling grenades. In desperation, the enemy troops threw numerous grenades at the exposed position of Sergeant Yoda but he fearlessly dodged some and kicked the others aside. Leaping into a trench that connected which connected with the enemy bunker, Sergeant Yoda entered the emplacement, alternately firing his rifle and throwing grenades. He then signaled his squad to advance and take the bunker. In the vicious firefight that ensued, Sergeant Yoda was seriously wounded but his actions enabled the troops to renew their assault and to secure their objective.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 20 (January 10, 1952)
Home Town: Hawaii

YOUNG, KERMIT
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Kermit Young (0-1324969), First Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company B, 1st Battalion, 5th Regimental Combat Team, 1st Cavalry Division. First Lieutenant Young distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces near Sobuk San, Korea on 22 August 1950. On this date Lieutenant Young was given the mission of taking a hill in the Sobuk San area. He moved his company out coolly and efficiently up the hill routing the enemy and securing the objective. During the ensuring seventy-two hours he and his company received considerable small arms and mortar fire. He continually exposed himself, going from foxhole to foxhole encouraging his men and directing their fire. Although painfully wounded he refused to be evacuated, and remained in command of his unit until his position was completely secured. The gallantry displayed by Lieutenant Young on this occasion reflects great credit on himself and the military services.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 89 (October 1, 1950)
Home Town: Marshall, Alabama

Z

ZACKMAN, LOUIS H.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Louis H. Zackman (US51208311), Private First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company C, 1st Battalion, 7th Infantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division. Private First Class Zackman distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces at Kumhwa, Korea, on 24 May 1953. On that date, Private Zackman was radio operator for a security patrol engaged in a fire-fight forward of the main line of resistance. Constantly vulnerable to enemy observation and fire, he accompanied the patrol leader in checking positions to relay messages and maintain contact with the command post. When his companion was severely wounded, Private Zackman rushed to the aid of the fallen man, grabbed his weapon, and swept the menacing foe with a merciless hail of fire. After his ammunition was expended, he threw grenades into the ranks of the hostile force, thereby blunting the assault. Observing an enemy grenade fall near his companion, Private Zackman hurled himself on the lethal missile, thus absorbing the impact of the explosion and saving his wounded leader and several comrades from death or serious injury. Inspired by his incredible display of valor, the men fought with such tenacity the enemy was routed with heavy casualties and the mission accomplished.
Department of the Army: General Orders No. 26 (April 2, 1954)
Home Town: Suffolk, New York

ZANIN, JOHN B.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to John B. Zanin (0-1307610), Captain (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as Operations Officer of the 3d Battalion, 24th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division. Captain Zanin distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces near Wonsan, Sobuk-San, Korea, on 11 and 12 August 1950. During the attack on Wonsan, although directed to bring up the rear of the assault companies, Captain Zanin voluntarily exposed himself to constant heavy, enemy mortar and small arms fire to personally develop the battalion's left flank in the attack. By employing the reserve companies and stragglers from the assault units, he broadened the support base of fire in order to relieve increasing enemy pressure upon the assault elements. From then on, Captain Zanin's aggressive reconnaissance for better positions, personal leadership, and his constant observation and adjustment of supporting fire enabled the battalion to continue the attack against numerically superior enemy forces. He was later seriously wounded while adjusting mortar fire upon the enemy. His keen tactical sense, his skillful terrain evaluation, and above all his inspiring leadership, coolness under fire, and extraordinary courage enabled his force to outmaneuver and inflict heavy casualties on the enemy.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 20 (January 13, 1951)
Home Town: Cambria, Pennsylvania

ZIMMERMAN, CHARLES T.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Charles T. Zimmerman (RA16301236), Private First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company C, 3d Engineer Combat Battalion, 24th Infantry Division. Private First Class Zimmerman distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces near Taejon, Korea, on 20 July 1950. On that date, the enemy established a road block to the rear of Company C which halted the retrograde movement of the unit. Without regard for his personal safety, Private First Class Zimmerman left his jeep and attacked the positions of three enemy snipers, killing them with accurate fire. During this action he was wounded twice. He then noted two enemy machine-guns firing from positions on each side of the road. Despite his wounds he advanced up the road and with accurate fire from his submachine-gun, destroyed both machine gun nests.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 54 (September 6, 1950)
Home Town: Fond Du Lac, Wisconsin

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