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Full Text Citations For Award of

The Distinguished Service Cross
 U.S. Army Recipients  - Vietnam 
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K

To All Who Shall See These Presents Greeting:

This is to Certify that
The President of the United States of America
Takes Pride in Presenting


THE 
DISTINGUISHED SERVICE CROSS
to

*KANESHIRO, EDWARD NOBORU (MIA)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Edward Noboru Kaneshiro (RA10113707), Staff Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company C, 1st Battalion, 9th Cavalry, 1st Cavalry Division. Staff Sergeant Kaneshiro distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 1 December 1966 while serving as a squad leader in an Infantry Platoon during a search and destroy mission at Phu Huu 2, Kimson Valley, Republic of Vietnam. Not knowing that the Village was heavily fortified and garrisoned by North Vietnamese troops in vastly superior force, two squads of the platoon had deployed to its center, while Sergeant Kaneshiro and squad scouted the more open terrain eastward. A fully bunkered and wholly concealed trench system ran the length of the village on the west side. From that source, machinegun and rifle fire suddenly came against the two squads at center, killing the platoon leader, the point man, wounding four others, then flattening and immobilizing the survivors. Sergeant Kaneshiro moved with his men to the sounds of the fire. Swiftly reading the situation, seeing the fire from the big trench had to be stopped if anyone was to survive, Sergeant Kaneshiro first deployed his men to cover, then crawled forward to attack it alone. He began by grenading from the parapet, while flattened, and his first round, entering the aperture of the bunker, silenced the machinegun and killed the gunner that had opened action. That done, with five grenades and his M-16 to sustain his assault, Sergeant Kaneshiro jumped into the trench to sweep its length, where it fronted the two pinned squads. Over the distance of about 35 meters, he worked the ditch alone, destroying one enemy group with M-16 fire and two others with grenade fires. By the end of his sweep, the able-bodied survivors of the two squads were again standing and preparing to move the dead and wounded. Sergeant Kaneshiro's assault enabled the orderly extrication and reorganization of the platoon which was the beginning of a larger action, and final success for the arms of the United States. Sergeant Kaneshiro's conspicuous gallantry and uncommon heroism under fire, at the cost of his life, are in keeping with the highest traditions of the military and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Department of the Army, General Orders No. 46 (October 26, 1967)
Home Town: Honolulu, Hawaii

KASUN, DAVID R.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to David R. Kasun, Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company D, 3d Battalion, 187th Infantry, 101st Airborne Division (Airmobile). Sergeant Kasun distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 7 and 8 October 1968 while serving as a squad leader during combat operations in the Trung Lap area. Sergeant Kasun's squad was advancing through the dense jungle undergrowth in the area when they were engaged by a large enemy force firing small arms and automatic weapons from well- concealed fighting positions. Ignoring the intense enemy fire, the sergeant led his men in an aggressive assault toward the positions. As they neared the hostile position, an enemy hand grenade landed beside Sergeant Kasun. Reacting immediately, he grabbed the grenade and tossed it back toward the enemy. However, the grenade detonated a few feet in front of the sergeant and inflicted serious wounds to his head and shoulders. Undaunted, Sergeant Kasun immediately assaulted a nearby enemy bunker and destroyed it with well-aimed automatic weapons fire and hand grenades. Refusing to be evacuated, the sergeant continued to assist his squad in their defensive maneuvers. During the ensuing battle, he moved forward of the perimeter to secure an allied radio that had been abandoned during a previous engagement. During this maneuver, Sergeant Kasun engaged and eliminated an enemy soldier in hand-to-hand combat. Then, returning to his company's position, he prepared his men for an aggressive enemy ground attack. During this assault, the sergeant continuously moved from one position to another to direct the fire of his men and pinpoint enemy targets. Sergeant Kasun's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 5162 (November 26, 1970)

*KAUHAIHAO, JOHN KUULEI
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to John Kuulei Kauhaihao (575-42-7379), First Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company B, 2d Battalion, 8th Cavalry, 1st Cavalry Division (Airmobile). First Lieutenant Kauhaihao distinguished himself during a reconnaissance-in-force operation in Tay Ninh Province. He was leading his platoon over thick jungle terrain at the point of their company when they were fired upon by a battalion-size force of North Vietnamese regulars occupying bunker fortifications. Lieutenant Kauhaihao quickly directed his men to cover behind several large, bamboo covered dirt mounds. As the rest of the company moved up to lend supporting fire to the pinned down point element, they were caught in a crossfire from flanking enemy bunkers. Seizing upon a momentary lull in the exchange of fire, Lieutenant Kauhaihao then hacked an opening through the bamboo growing over the dirt mound behind which he took cover. In the next fifteen minutes, he hurled more than thirty hand grenades through this opening at the enemy bunkers. In so doing, Lieutenant Kauhaihao drew enemy fire on himself again and again so that his men could sight enemy gunners and bring them under suppressive fire. Lieutenant Kauhaihao then directed the withdrawal of his battered point element. Crawling over a hundred meters of fire-swept terrain, he dragged vital equipment to the rear and helped wounded soldiers to a position of safety. While rejoining his men to the company's main force, Lieutenant Kauhaihao sighted an enemy squad moving up on his tattered platoon. As he advanced to engage the approaching enemy, Lieutenant Kauhaihao was morally wounded by enemy fire. First Lieutenant Kauhaihao's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 1047 (May 4, 1970)
Home Town: Honaunau, Hawaii

KELLEY, GORDON F.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Gordon F. Kelley (0-5337549), Second Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company C, 2d Battalion (Mechanized), 22d Infantry, 3d Brigade, 25th Infantry Division. Second Lieutenant Kelley distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 2 January 1968 as platoon leader of an infantry unit defending against a massive enemy attack on Fire Base Burt. The insurgents struck the camp with a murderous night mortar barrage. Lieutenant Kelley personally insured that his men were under cover and that they were fully prepared for the ground attack which followed. The vanguard of the assault went directly into Lieutenant Kelley's platoon position. Throughout the ensuing eight hour battle, he moved from position to position to adjust his platoon's fire, relocate weapons, inspire his men, and supervise the treatment and evacuation of wounded personnel. Although painfully wounded by shrapnel, Lieutenant Kelley refused medical attention and repeatedly braved the relentless enemy fire to adjust air strikes and artillery to within fifty meters of his own position. These strikes and the well directed fires from his superbly led infantrymen repulsed the fanatic assault. Second Lieutenant Kelley's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 2735 (June 7, 1968)

*KELLEY, JERRY CONRAD
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Jerry Conrad Kelley (US55876523), Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company C, 1st Battalion (Airborne), 503d Infantry, 173d Airborne Brigade (Separate). Specialist Four Kelley distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 12 November 1967 while serving as machine gunner of an airborne infantry company on combat operations near Dak To. His company was savagely attacked by a North Vietnamese Army battalion firing mortars, rockets and small arms from well-concealed positions. Specialist Kelley quickly laid down a devastating base of counterfire which stalled the enemy attack. Several men had been wounded in the initial enemy barrage, and he took up an exposed position to cover their evacuation. With bullets striking all around him, he inflicted heavy casualties to the attackers. Badly outnumbered, his unit was forced to pull back to a more defensible position. Specialist Kelley elected to remain between his company and the hostile forces and covered the withdrawal. The North Vietnamese concentrated their attention and efforts on his position in an attempt to stop his ravaging fire, and he was wounded by an intense enemy fusillade. With complete disregard for his safety, he moved back twenty meters and once more set up his machine gun to repel the enemy attack. Realizing he had become cut off from his company, he fought furiously against the savage North Vietnamese Army force's assault until he was mortally wounded. His fearless actions disrupted the momentum of the enemy attack and prevented numerous casualties to his fellow soldiers. Specialist Four Kelley's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 1140 (May 15, 1968)
Home Town: Englewood, Colorado

*KELLEY, WILLIAM FRANCIS
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to William Francis Kelley (263-66-7190), Staff Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company D, 1st Battalion, 20th Infantry, 11th Infantry Brigade, Americal Division. Staff Sergeant Kelley distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 31 May 1969 during reconnaissance-in-force operations near Tap An Nam. Supported by a troop of armored personnel carriers, his unit was dispatched to outflank a North Vietnamese force that had immobilized a sister unit with heavy suppressive fire. As the reinforcements advanced through open rice paddies, they were suddenly fired upon from a hedgerow to their front. Sergeant Kelley boldly dashed to the hedgerow and attacked the hidden enemy with numerous grenades and devastating rifle fire. His lone assault repelled the enemy troops and permitted the friendly force to break through the vegetation and advance on the main enemy body occupying an abandoned hamlet nearby. Having rearmed himself with grenades, Sergeant Kelley crawled within feet of a hostile trenchline and dropped a grenade on its unsuspecting defenders. Although stunned by the ensuing blast, he quickly rose to his feet and emptied his rifle on the survivors. Then observing that enemy soldiers manning an emplacement some sixty meters distant were placing harassing fire on his unit, he charged the position under heavy fire and, firing his weapon on the run, eliminated their resistance. Staff Sergeant Kelley's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 3885 (October 18, 1969)
Home Town: Tampa, Florida

*KELLY, CHARLES L.
Synopsis:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Charles L. Kelly (0-70399), Major (Medical Service Corps), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with 57th Medical Detachment. Major Kelly distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 1 July 1964 while flying a medical evacuation helicopter. His extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Department of the Army, General Orders No. 40 (December 11, 1964)
Home Town: Warm Springs, Georgia
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KELLY, DONALD W.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Donald W. Kelly, Sergeant First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in action in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Troop B, 1st Squadron, 11th Armored Cavalry Regiment. Platoon Sergeant Kelly distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 19 April 1969 while leading a platoon on a reconnaissance-in-force mission near Dau Tieng. When a North Vietnamese force opened fire on the troop's tracked vehicles with rocket-propelled grenades and automatic weapons, Sergeant Kelly instantly arranged his platoon on line and assaulted the hostile positions directly. As the battle raged, he secured three tanks and directed them to evacuate the wounded from the area. He then continued his assault on the enemy and succeeded in destroying five bunkers and four rocket-propelled grenade positions. Observing the deadly fusillade from a recoilless rifle team, he fired his machine gun on the emplacement to eliminate it. When the troop broke contact with the hostile element, Sergeant Kelly supervised the salvage and withdrawal of disabled vehicles. Platoon Sergeant Kelly's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 3491 (September 13, 1969)

*KELLY, GEORGE THOMAS, III
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to George Thomas Kelly, III (238-80-9936), First Lieutenant (Field Artillery), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving an opposing armed force in the Republic of Viet Nam, while serving with Battery C, 6th Battalion, 14th Artillery, I Field Force, Vietnam. First Lieutenant Kelly distinguished himself while serving as forward observer with a Vietnamese battalion near Dak Seang. Lieutenant Kelly's battalion had been engaged with a North Vietnamese Regiment in continuous combat for several days. During the previous night the battalion had been aggressively attacked by the enemy who had moved to within thirty meters of the battalion's perimeter. Only through Lieutenant Kelly's daring and precise artillery adjustment was the enemy attack repulsed. During the early afternoon of 22 April 1970, Lieutenant Kelly led his beleaguered comrades in an attempt to break through the enemy encirclement and reach Camp Dak Seang. After several hours of travel, a bomb crater large enough to be utilized as a landing zone was discovered. A medical evacuation helicopter was immediately summoned by radio. Moments after the helicopter's arrival, the enemy emerged from the tree line and struck Lieutenant Kelly's force again. Because of the intense hostile fire, the heavily laden helicopter experienced great difficulty in taking off. Lieutenant Kelly unhesitantly left the ship to engage the enemy in an attempt to divert their fire and to allow the helicopter to depart. As Lieutenant Kelly maneuvered to one side of the clearing to provide cover fire, he was mortally wounded by enemy small arms fire. First Lieutenant Kelly's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 3727 (August 11, 1970)
Home Town: High Point, North Carolina

KELLY, ROSS S.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Ross S. Kelly, First Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Airborne Division Assistance Team, United States Army Advisory Group. First Lieutenant Ross distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions while serving as Deputy Senior Advisor and Acting Senior Advisor, 6th Airborne Battalion, Airborne Division, Army of the Republic of Vietnam, during the period 14 April 1972 to 21 April 1972. On a combat assault to relieve enemy pressure of the besieged provincial capital of An Loc, the 6th Airborne Battalion immediately engaged numerically superior enemy forces. During this period, Lieutenant Kelly repeatedly exposed himself to enemy small arms and indirect fire while directing friendly airstrikes to within 25 meters of his position. The battalion received intensive enemy indirect fire for several days during which he continually thwarted enemy troop attacks by effectively employing massive air power against their positions. During a nighttime attempt to break out of the enemy encirclement under the cover of B-52 strikes, Lieutenant Kelly succeeded in leading the remainder of the battalion through enemy lines while receiving direct and indirect fire from all directions. Although weak and exhausted, his personal example and forceful urging helped to encourage the battalion to continue over the rough terrain as they used the remaining small amount of ammunition to protect their rear elements against advancing enemy troops. Once again Lieutenant Kelly employed supporting airstrikes and the battalion was successfully evacuated from the area. His leadership, professional knowledge and tenacity in the face of overwhelming odds were directly responsible for saving the battalion from imminent disaster. Lieutenant Kelly's personal bravery and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, MACV Support Command General Orders No. 2438 (October 17, 1972

KELTNER, NEIL L.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Neil L. Keltner (0-5418251), First Lieutenant (Armor), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Troop C, 1st Squadron, 11th Armored Cavalry Regiment. First Lieutenant Keltner distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 21 November 1966 while commanding the security element of a large convoy near Long Binh. The convoy received intense fire from a large Viet Cong force concealed on both sides of the highway. Lieutenant Keltner immediately moved to the head of the convoy where the danger was greatest, and led them beyond the fire. With all weapons firing, he returned to the killing zone, personally accounting for five insurgent casualties. He constantly directed aggressive maneuvers of his platoon and the removal of damaged vehicles and wounded men from danger. When he received a hit which wounded him in the calf and thigh, and destroyed his communications, he ran through the intense fire to another vehicle to maintain radio contact with all defensive elements. Moving again to the head of the convoy, he called in medical evacuation helicopters and air strikes upon the hostile emplacements. Heedless of the inherent danger, Lieutenant Keltner calmly maintained order on the congested highway, held off the superior Viet Cong force until relief arrived, and prevented the destruction of the whole convoy. Lieutenant Keltner's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 7008 (December 23, 1966)
Born: August 26, 1940 at Lansing, Michigan
Home Town: Houston, Texas

KEMMER, THOMAS
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Thomas Kemmer, Master Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary gallantry in action on 21 November 1970 as a member of an all-volunteer joint United States Army and Air Force raiding force organized by the Joint Chiefs of Staff to conduct a heliborne assault in a heroic effort to rescue United States military personnel held as prisoners of war at Son Tay prison in North Vietnam. After debarking from the assault helicopter which crash-landed inside the prison compound, Sergeant Kemmer aggressively maneuvered to secure and clear his preplanned position. Immediately upon reaching his position, he faced a sudden attack of North Vietnamese soldiers moving from the north area of the compound in an apparent attempt to reinforce the east gate area. With complete disregard for his life, Sergeant Kemmer remained at his exposed and unconcealed position and fearlessly engaged the attacking enemy with his rifle. Sergeant Kemmer then unhesitatingly continued his preplanned task of searching and clearing a key cell block. Sergeant Kemmer's bold and courageous actions were an inspiration to his comrades and contributed immeasurably to the successful execution of the raid. His extraordinary gallantry in action is in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflects great credit on him and the United States Army.
Department of the Army, General Orders No. 43 (August 9, 1971)

KENDALL, JOE A.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Joe A. Kendall (0-5337410), Second Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company A, 1st Battalion, 28th Infantry, 1st Brigade, 1st Infantry Division. Second Lieutenant Kendall distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 4 November 1967 while serving as platoon leader of an infantry company on a sweep operation near Loc Ninh. While struggling through dense bamboo jungle, the lead elements of his platoon came under small arms fire from the front. After quickly deploying his men in a defensive formation and directing their fire in the direction of the enemy attack, he contacted his point elements by radio and directed them to return to the platoon's position. He detected well-concealed enemy firing lanes cut in the bamboo and realized that his scouts would have to cross them to reach his perimeter. Despite the increasing intensity of the hostile barrage, Lieutenant Kendall crawled across the bullet-swept firing lanes, contacted the forward elements, and led them safely back to his platoon's location. As the fight continued, one of his men was wounded and trapped in a lane. Disregarding his personal safety, he moved through a hail of bullets to reach the man and pull him to safety. He was wounded during the rescue but refused aid and continued to direct the actions of his troops. Determining that the Viet Cong were moving from lane to lane, he set up machine guns in momentarily abandoned firing strips to engage the insurgents when they returned. One gunner became separated from his crew, and Lieutenant Kendall dashed through heavy fire to re-supply him with ammunition and encourage the man. As artillery support began to pound the enemy positions, he led the platoon's withdrawal to join the main force in a nearby rubber plantation. His courage and leadership in close combat were a source of inspiration to his men and prevented his platoon from suffering heavy casualties. Second Lieutenant Kendall's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 726 (February 16, 1968)

KENNEDY, ALTON R.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Alton R. Kennedy (US52659547), Private First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 1st Battalion (Airborne), 12th Cavalry, 1st Cavalry Division (Airmobile). Private First Class Kennedy distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 17 December 1966 while serving as a medic with elements of the 1st Cavalry Division during a combat assault in the Highway 506 Valley. Maneuvering against an entrenched North Vietnamese Army force, his platoon and another company became pinned down by intense hostile fire. Private Kennedy quickly raced forward and began treating his stricken comrades. Dauntlessly exposing himself to the devastating fire, he was wounded in the leg as he aided a fellow soldier. Unmindful of the pain, Private Kennedy crawled to the side of another man and bandaged his wounds. He then called for men to help in the evacuation and made several trips back through the hail of bullets to carry more injured soldiers to safety. Oblivious to the extreme dangers, Private Kenned left his covered position to retrieve another casualty, who was lying within ten meters of an insurgent bunker. Inching his way through the rounds that were kicking up dirt all around him, he succeeded in dragging the man back to the company perimeter. Pausing only to retard his own bleeding, Private Kennedy ignored requests to await further treatment and courageously reentered the ravaged battlefield. Her crawled forward yet another time, but was fatally wounded a few meters from a hostile machine gun position. His unimpeachable valor and selfless concern for the welfare of others, inspired his entrapped comrades and saved the lives of others, inspired his entrapped comrades and saved the lives of many fellow soldiers. Private First Class Kennedy's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 1059 (March 11, 1967)

KENNEDY, HERMAN J.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Herman J. Kennedy (RA17224568), Master Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with 5th Special Forces Group (Airborne), 1st Special Forces. On 26 July 1964, Sergeant Kennedy was serving as a Special Forces Advisor to a one hundred and ninety man Vietnamese Strike Force patrol. The patrol's mission was to attack and destroy a well-fortified Viet Cong mountain stronghold. At 0530 hours, the forward element of the patrol, composed of Sergeant Kennedy, another United States Special Forces Sergeant, and four Vietnamese, positioned themselves within ten yards of the insurgent camp to keep surveillance of Viet Cong activity within the outpost and to wait for the main body of the patrol to move into position. Simultaneously, a magazine from a weapon of an advancing member of the main body was dropped and tumbled down the mountainside. Immediately, the Viet Cong opened fire on the advancing group. During the initial burst of automatic weapons fire and grenades, four members of the forward element were wounded. Sergeant Kennedy with complete disregard for his own personal safety, charged through the intense hail of hostile firepower and overran two Viet Cong emplacements, killing the gunners of each position. Despite leg wounds received from punji stakes during the initial assault and notwithstanding the fact that his weapon was out of ammunition, Sergeant Kennedy grabbed one of the dead insurgent's weapons and killed a Viet Cong grenadier and wounded another insurgent. Although exposed to hostile fire, he continued to direct the attack and personally moved three seriously wounded men to safer positions. He again joined the assault and continued on until the insurgents were routed from the area and their camp destroyed. Sergeant Kennedy's extraordinary heroism and gallantry in action were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Army and reflect great credit upon himself and the military service.
Headquarters, US Army, Pacific, General Orders No. 117 (April 19, 1965)

KENNEDY, LESLIE D.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Leslie D. Kennedy (0-5322546), First Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company A, 2d Battalion (Airborne), 502d Infantry, 1st Brigade, 101st Airborne Division. First Lieutenant Kennedy distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 15 September 1966 while serving as platoon leader of an airborne infantry platoon on a reinforcing mission near Tuy Hoa. When a sister platoon was savagely attacked and pinned down by a numerically superior Viet Cong force firing machine guns and automatic weapons, Lieutenant Kennedy immediately led his platoon to relieve the beleaguered friendly force. Upon arrival at the battle site, his unit made heavy contact with the enemy and was pinned down by intense enemy fire. Lieutenant Kennedy observed a machine gun placing a heavy barrage on his men and began crawling toward its position to destroy the gun. When he had crawled within ten meters of the hostile emplacement, an enemy automatic weapon began firing at him from his left flank. Completely disregarding his own safety, he stood up in the ravaging hail of bullets and charged that position, silencing the weapon and killing two Viet Cong soldiers. The enemy machine gunner detected his actions and immediately unleashed a fierce barrage on him. With bullets striking all around him, he charged across the open battlefield into the face of the enemy weapon and single-handedly destroyed the position and its three occupants with rifle and grenade fire. His fearless leadership inspired his men to spontaneously attack and overrun the determined insurgents, forcing them to flee. First Lieutenant Kennedy's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 6373 (December 11, 1967)
Born: November 9, 1939 at Beatrice, Nebraska
Home Town: Beatrice, Nebraska

KENT, ALAN
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Alan Kent (RA16855606), Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company B, 2d Battalion (Airborne), 502d Infantry, 1st Brigade, 101st Airborne Division. Specialist Four Kent distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 18 May 1967 while serving with an airborne infantry platoon on a combat mission near Duc Pho. His unit was moving to reinforce a heavily-engaged sister platoon when it was fiercely attacked and pinned down by an enemy force firing automatic weapons. Specialist Kent was painfully wounded in the initial barrage, but he refused aid and dashed through a sheet of enemy fire to reach a fallen comrade and carry him to safety. As his platoon attempted to maneuver against the enemy positions, the intensity of the fusillade increased, inflicted several casualties to the friendly forces and caused the unit to pull back. Specialist Kent saw one of the new casualties trapped in the open and moved across the bullet-swept battlefield to aid him. Finding the man dead, he charged into the face of withering fire and destroyed a nearby enemy bunker with deadly rifle fire and grenades. Automatic weapons fire from another position began raking his location, and he assaulted the second emplacement. After being knocked to the ground and wounded by an enemy grenade, he staggered to his feet, continued his charge on the bunker and demolished it. He then conducted a one-man frontal assault on a machine gun bunker. As a hail of bullets cut down brush and kicked up dirt all around him, he fearlessly pressed the attack and silenced the weapon with a hand grenade. His aggressive charge and devastating fire forced the determined enemy to break contact and flee the battlefield. Specialist Four Kent's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 911 (February 28, 1968)

*KERNAHAN, GREGORY P., JR.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Gregory P. Kernahan, Jr. (OF-100823), Captain (Corps of Engineers), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with the United States Army Engineer Command. Captain Kernahan distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions while serving as a Convoy Commander near Pleiku and Kontum, Republic of Vietnam, on 6 March 1968. Captain Kernahan's unit was ambushed by a hostile force. His personal courage and inspiring leadership while directing the preparation of the convoy's defense and care for the wounded resulted in a well-organized defensive action. After his vehicle had completely cleared the kill zone, Captain Kernahan voluntarily returned to aid his comrades. He appeared to be oblivious of the intense enemy fire and knew that moving from vehicle to vehicle was extremely dangerous. Leaving the shelter of a dump truck to reach and aid several wounded men, he himself was wounded by small arms fire. As his own wounds were being treated, he continued to give directions as to how the defense was to be established and instructions for the care of the wounded. Almost an hour passed before the evacuation of the wounded commenced. Captain Kernahan directed this action and insisted on being the last evacuated. As a result, he died before reaching the hospital. Captain Kernahan's extraordinary heroism and intrepidity, at the cost of his own life, are in the highest traditions of the United States Army and reflects great credit upon himself and the Armed Forces of his country.
Department of the Army, General Orders No. 80 (December 16, 1968)
Home Town: Avon By The Sea, New Jersey

KERNS, RAYMOND A.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Raymond A. Kerns (W-3155916), Warrant Officer (W-1), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Troop A, 1st Battalion, 9th Cavalry, 1st Cavalry Division (Airmobile). Warrant Officer Kerns distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 19 September 1967 as a pilot on an armed reconnaissance mission in Binh Thuan Province. Mister Kerns was diverted from his mission to assist a platoon heavily engaged by a Viet Cong force firing automatic weapons and small arms. As he made a low-level pass over the battle area, his ship received intense fire from a treeline. Ignoring the vulnerability of his scout helicopter, he launched a devastating attack on one enemy position and suppressed its weapons with deadly accurate fire. As he hovered over the silenced position to assess the damage, his ship received heavy fire from two more emplacements. Disregarding his safety, he remained in position and executed a series of turns that enabled his gunner to engage and kill the attackers. The friendly infantry began an assault on the enemy and was brought under heavy fire. Mister Kerns again attacked the Viet Cong, forcing them to break cover and run in the face of the infantry's pursuit. He inflicted heavy casualties to the insurgents as they tried to escape. Two fleeing enemy soldiers took refuge in some brush and Mister Kerns hovered over their position until they surrendered to the friendly ground forces. His fearless actions in the heat of battle contributed greatly to the decisive defeat inflicted on the Viet Cong. Warrant Officer Kerns' extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 2016 (May 2, 1968)

KETTLES, CHARLES S.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Charles S. Kettles (0-1938018), Major (Artillery), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with 176th Aviation Company (Airmobile) (Light), 14th Combat Aviation Battalion, Americal Division. Major Kettles distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 15 May 1967 while serving as aircraft commander of a helicopter supporting infantry operations near Duc Pho. An airborne Infantry unit had come under heavy enemy attack and had suffered casualties. Major Kettles immediately volunteered to carry reinforcements to the embattled force and evacuate their wounded from the battle site. Although friendly artillery had pounded the hostile positions, the enemy was well entrenched and fighting fiercely. Major Kettles led a flight of helicopters into the landing zone through a savage barrage. Small arms and automatic weapons fire raked the landing zone and inflicted heavy damage to the ships, but Major Kettles refused to leave the ground until all the craft were loaded to capacity. He then led them out of the battle area. He later returned to the battlefield with more reinforcements and landed in the midst of a rain of mortar and automatic weapons fire which wounded his gunner and ruptured his fuel tank. After leading more wounded aboard, he nursed the crippled craft back to his base. He then secured another ship and led a flight of six helicopters to extract the Infantry unit. All but eight men had been loaded when Major Kettles directed the flight to take off. Completely disregarding his safety, he maneuvered his lone craft through a savage enemy fusillade to where the remainder of the Infantrymen waited. Mortar fire blasted out his windshield, but he remained on the ground until the men were aboard. The enemy concentrated massive firepower on his helicopter and another mortar round badly damaged his tail boom, but he once more skillfully guided his heavily damaged ship to safety. Major Kettles' extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 1049 (March 9, 1968)

*KIGER, DENNIS DELMAR
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Dennis Delmar Kiger (474-48-0700), Staff Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company B, 8th Engineer Battalion, 1st Cavalry Division (Airmobile). Staff Sergeant Kiger distinguished himself while serving as a volunteer member of an infantry company during an assault of an enemy element entrenched around a large cache. As Sergeant Kiger and his comrades advanced toward the enemy emplacements, they came under an intense barrage of enemy fire. Nevertheless, the company continued to advance until the enemy fire wounded several of the friendly soldiers. At this time, Sergeant Kiger sprang to his feet amid the hail of enemy bullets and assaulted the nearest enemy position. Although wounded as he advanced, he continued his assault until he eliminated the enemy position and four enemy soldiers. He then placed intense rifle fire on the enemy from his exposed position until he was mortally wounded by enemy fire. Staff Sergeant Kiger's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 4062 (March 31, 1970)
Home Town: Minneapolis, Minnesota

KIMURA, DONALD K.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Donald K. Kimura, Specialist Fifth Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 3d Battalion, 22d Infantry, 1st Brigade, 25th Infantry Division. Specialist Five Kimura distinguished himself while serving as senior medical advisor during a company search and clear mission on the northeastern slope of Nui Ba Den Mountain. While conducting a sweep through various mountainside caves, Specialist Kimura's unit engaged an estimated battalion size enemy force. During this initial encounter, Specialist Kimura braved enemy sniper fire several times as he maneuvered long distances to administer aid and to direct the wounded to cover. Still under enemy fire, Specialist Kimura returned to the base of the mountain and personally carried several casualties to evacuation helicopters. Later in the afternoon, as the entire company was moving to the base of the mountain, the enemy renewed their attack and caused several more casualties. Specialist Kimura crawled over sixty meters through the enemy fire to aid his wounded comrades. Upon arrival of an extraction helicopter, Specialist Kimura lifted a wounded man over his shoulder and moved toward the landing zone. As he approached the helicopter, enemy automatic weapons fire wounded the injured man and caused both of them to fall to the ground. Signaling the helicopter to leave, Specialist Kimura administered aid to his critically wounded comrade in this position for thirty minutes until he could be evacuated. During the entire action, Specialist Kimura treated twenty-five casualties and was credited with saving two lives. Specialist Five Kimura's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 3243 (July 14, 1970)

*KING, LARRY DOUGLAS
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Larry Douglas King (US54665460), Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company A, 2d Battalion (Mechanized), 22d Infantry, 3d Brigade, 25th Infantry Division. Sergeant King distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 4 February 1968 while on an ambush patrol in the Michelin rubber plantation. A Viet Cong force moved into the patrol's ambush late at night. When the enemy were in range, Sergeant King fired two claymore mines into the insurgents, inflicting several casualties. The enemy quickly returned savage fire on the patrol, and Sergeant King braved the fusillade to move among his men and direct their fire. Seeing his machine gunner hit, he moved through a hail of bullets and carried the wounded soldier to safety. When a relief column of armored personnel carriers reached the raging firefight, he leaped atop the lead vehicle and directed its machine gun fire into the Viet Cong positions. The hostile fire mounted in intensity, and the personnel carrier's machine gunner was wounded. Completely disregarding his personal safety, Sergeant King moved to the front of the vehicle and delivered devastating fire on the insurgents with his own machine gun. He was mortally wounded by a Viet Cong rocket while fearlessly engaging a numerically superior enemy force in close combat. Sergeant King's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 1747 (April 16, 1968)
Home Town: Talihina, Oklahoma

KINGSTON, ROBERT CHARLES
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Robert Charles Kingston (0-71534), Lieutenant Colonel (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Headquarters, 1st Battalion, 35th Infantry, 3d Brigade, 25th Infantry Division. Lieutenant Colonel Kingston distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions during the period 22 November 1966 to 24 November 1966 while commanding elements of the 1st Battalion, 35th Infantry Division on a search and destroy mission. When two of his companies made contact with the forward positions of a Viet Cong battalion, Colonel Kingston landed by helicopter and assumed control of ground operations. In the evening of 22 November 1966 when the lead company was pinned down by intense automatic weapons fire, Colonel Kingston, with complete disregard for his safety, charged a wounded Viet Cong and wrestled a weapon from him. While firing the captured weapon, he then led an assault on the hostile positions and forced the insurgents to flee. Throughout the three day period, Colonel Kingston repeatedly exposed himself to hostile fire, to encourage his troops and direct air strikes and artillery against the Viet Cong emplacements. His aggressive leadership and personal courage inspired his men to fight with renewed vigor and defeat the numerically superior hostile force. Colonel Kingston's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 7024 (December 25, 1966)

KIZIRIAN, JOHN
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to John Kizirian (0-91916), Lieutenant Colonel (Military Intelligence), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Advisory Team 95, Technical Intelligence Detachment, 525th Military Intelligence Group. Lieutenant Colonel Kizirian distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 12 and 13 May 1967 while serving as III Corps G-2 advisor on a combat patrol near Bien Hoa. Intelligence reports indicated that a Viet Cong force which had recently attacked the air base was operating in the vicinity, and he led a Vietnamese company-size combat patrol in pursuit of the enemy. Preplanned air strikes hit the hostile fortifications before he reached them, but he ignored the warning which the attack gave to the hostile forces and moved in to assess the bomb damage. He moved to the front of the patrol when it became momentarily disorganized in the dense jungle and quickly rallied his men and moved toward the objective. While crossing a river, he detected a fleeing Viet Cong force and immediately pursued them until he reached an area which he suspected was their camp. Deploying his main force for security, he led three men to the edge of a clearing but was pinned down by small arms and grenade fire. The company could not get to the firefight because of dense jungle and intense firepower which pinned them down, but Colonel Kizirian moved through a hail of bullets to lead them in an attack on the camp which routed the insurgents after they had suffered heavy casualties. He personally killed two insurgents with accurate fire and supervised the destruction of the bunker and tunnel complex used as a regimental base camp. While he led his men back to base, the Viet Cong repeatedly harassed the patrol from ambush. He exposed himself to withering fire time after time to fight furiously and inflict heavy casualties on the determined insurgents. Lieutenant Colonel Kizirian's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 5965 (November 18, 1967)

*KLINE, JAMES JOSEPH
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to James Joseph Kline (US52811137), Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company C, 2d Battalion, 3d Infantry, 199th Infantry Brigade (Separate) (Light). Specialist Four Kline distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous action on 14 May 1968 while serving as an assistant machine gunner during combat operations in enemy territory. He was helping secure the perimeter of his company base camp when a large Viet Cong force attacked. Under the cover of darkness and a driving rain, the enemy was able to penetrate the company's defenses and take control of several bunker positions. During the savage battle that followed, several of the defenders were wounded and stranded in the open. Although wounded himself, Specialist Kline left his position to aid his injured comrades. Moving through withering enemy machine gun and rocket fire, he carried one casualty after another from the battle area to safety. After having removed six men from the line of fire, he began checking bunkers for other wounded personnel. He discovered that two American casualties were trapped in an enemy-held bunker. Disregarding his safety, Specialist Kline courageously assaulted the position, killing two insurgents and silencing their machine gun. As he continued to advance against the fortification, he was mortally wounded by enemy fire. Specialist Kline's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 3575 (July 24, 1968)
Home Town: Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

KLINGER, VERNON L., JR.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Vernon L. Klinger, Jr., First Lieutenant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 52d Aviation Battalion, 1st Aviation Brigade. First Lieutenant Klinger distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 22 May 1969 while leading a four-man Pathfinder team near Dak To. His team was inserted into enemy-held Landing Zone Yankee as advance guard for troops to be inserted later. When the helicopter carrying the team landed it immediately came under volleys of hostile fire wounding the crew chief and killing the pilot and two Vietnamese scouts. As Lieutenant Klinger led his team out of the helicopter into the volleys of automatic weapons fire, he observed four enemy charging the craft and eliminated them with rifle fire. As the damaged helicopter lifted out of the landing zone, Lieutenant Klinger led his greatly outnumbered men to a nearby bomb crater. He and his team killed four more enemy soldiers en route to the crater. Using the short respite this rapid maneuver had gained, Lieutenant Klinger positioned his men to cover all sides of the crater. As the enemy drew the trap tighter, he was wounded in the leg by hand grenade fragments, but he continued to fire his rifle and radioed for helicopter gunship support. Frequently during the next hour, Lieutenant Klinger exposed himself to the enemy fire to direct better the gunship and tactical fighter-bomber strikes against the determined attackers. His guidance was so precise that 750-pound bombs impacted only fifty meters from his position. Twice the team was given up for dead by crews of the aircraft overhead, but Lieutenant Klinger continued to inspire his team to repel the enemy. When reinforcements arrived, he directed his men in providing suppressive fire for the troop helicopters. With the arrival of the reinforcements the enemy withdrew, leaving the bodies of forty-one dead around the crater defended by the team. First Lieutenant Klinger's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 167 (1970)

*KLUG, HERBERT WHEELER
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Herbert Wheeler Klug (299447887), Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company A, 3d Battalion, 7th Infantry, 199th Infantry Brigade. While on a reconnaissance operation, near the village of Suoi Kiet, Specialist Klug's unit was ambushed by an enemy force of unknown size. Four of the six men in the lead element were wounded, and the platoon leader was mortally wounded. The company commander ordered the platoon to withdraw so he could call in support artillery fire on the enemy positions. Realizing that the enemy would immediately overrun the five trapped forward as soon as the platoon withdrew, Specialist Klug and two other comrades volunteered to try and rescue the wounded. Trying to reach the wounded soldiers, one of the three was wounded. Specialist Klug pulled the wounded soldier to safety and continued the search with his remaining buddy for the other wounded men. Finding two of the stranded and wounded soldiers, Specialist Klug and his comrade pulled these men back to the perimeter. While rescuing the two soldiers Specialist Klug was wounded. Despite this wound, Specialist Klug left the perimeter in search of the other wounded soldiers. Upon finding the wounded men Specialist Klug placed effective suppressive fire on the enemy while pulling the wounded men back toward the perimeter. While crossing an exposed rocky area, Specialist Klug was mortally wounded by a rocket-propelled grenade. His courage and concern for the welfare of his fellow soldiers earned him the respect of all whom he served. Specialist Four Klug's extraordinary heroism, at the cost of his life, was in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Department of the Army, General Orders No. 31 (July 1, 1971)
Home Town: Dayton, Ohio

*KNADLE, ROBERT EDWARD
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Robert Edward Knadle (0-5243162), Second Lieutenant (Corps of Engineers), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company A, 35th Engineer Battalion, United States Army Engineer Command, Vietnam. Second Lieutenant Knadle distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 9 October 1967 while serving as platoon leader of an engineer unit operating near Phu Li Bridge. While en route to his base camp by jeep, Lieutenant Knadle and his squad were savagely ambushed by a numerically superior Viet Cong force firing automatic weapons and grenades from both sides of the road. He was wounded and the vehicle was disabled by the withering barrage. He quickly directed his men to defensive positions while he remained in the open by the jeep to radio for reinforcements and medical evacuation. Completely disregarding his own safety, he refused to take cover and maintained radio contact with friendly units coming to his assistance. The enemy forces concentrated their fire on his exposed position in an attempt to cut communications, and he was seriously wounded by exploding grenades. Heedless of bullets striking all around him, he refused aid and fought furiously to repel the mounting enemy attack. He was mortally wounded while gallantly leading his men in the face of grave danger. His fearless actions inspired his men to continue fighting until reinforcements arrived and defeated the determined hostile forces. Second Lieutenant Knadle's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 6340 (December 10, 1967)
Home Town: Camp Springs, Maryland

*KNIGHT, PETER STANLEY
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Peter Stanley Knight (0-91902), Captain (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company A, 1st Battalion, 16th Infantry, 1st Infantry Division. Captain Knight distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 25 August 1966 while serving as a company commander during a combat mission near Binh Duong Province. When Captain Knight's company was directed to assault a fortified base camp of an estimated Viet Cong battalion, he immediately deployed two of his platoons, held one in reserve and began to advance through the dense jungle and bamboo thickets toward the insurgent complex. S the assault elements emerged from the jungle, Captain Knight learned that the platoon on his right flank had received intense Viet Cong fire and sustained numerous casualties. Realizing the seriousness of the situation, he rushed to the stricken platoon, reorganized his men and called his reserve platoon for assistance. As Captain Knight led his reinforced unit on a renewed assault against the Viet Cong stronghold, the Viet Cong again opened with a suppressive barrage of fire. Although his company was staggered by the intense hostile fire, Captain Knight fearlessly exposed himself and rallied a small group of men in an attack on a Viet Cong emplacement. Inspired by this courageous attack, the remaining elements pushed forward in a final determined drive to rout the Viet Cong. Although he was wounded while exposing himself and encouraging his comrades to continue the assault, Captain Knight, with complete disregard for his safety, continued to lead his company until he was mortally wounded by Viet Cong fire. Through his courage and outstanding leadership, he inspired his badly stricken company to continue the attack until the determined Viet Cong force was completely routed from its base camp. Captain Knight's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 6561 (November 29, 1966)
Home Town: Key West, Florida

KNIGHT, ROBERT CLYDE
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Robert Clyde Knight (0-5312436), Captain (Aviation), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with 336th Assault Helicopter Company, 13th Combat Aviation (Delta) Battalion, 164th Combat Aviation Group, 1st Aviation Brigade. Captain Knight distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 31 January 1968 as an aircraft commander and the leader of an assault helicopter platoon defending against the communist Lunar New Year offensive on Soc Trang. An enemy battalion reinforced by numerous local guerilla companies launched a coordinated mortar and ground assault on the city and the adjacent airfield. Captain Knight dashed through a hail of impacting rounds to reach his gunship as others took cover all around him. Airborne, he flew low over the enemy positions, locating several weapons emplacements from which devastating fire was hitting the air base. Without regard to the savage barrage directed at his ship, he successfully destroyed several vital enemy positions with rockets and machine gun fire. As other helicopters arrived, he organized them into a team and directed their assaults on the determined insurgents. As the siege on the air field lifted at dawn, he led his platoon toward the city where Viet Cong threatened to overrun vital military positions. Another officer was assigned the mission Captain Knight had ably performed throughout the night and early morning hours, but he refused to ground his aircraft for a deserved rest. Instead he joined in fierce attacks on enemy forces attempting to gain control of the area. For over twenty-eight consecutive hours, he repeatedly risked his life and braved withering fire to knock out hostile weapons positions and destroy the assaulting Viet Cong forces. His fearless efforts in the heat of battle inflicted heavy casualties on the enemy and were instrumental in repelling the massive offensive. Captain Knight's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 2650 (June 1, 1968)
Home Town: Westbrook, Maine

KOPSOLIAS, LESTER
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Lester Kopsolias (US67154480), Private First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in action in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Troop A, 1st Squadron, 11th Armored Cavalry Regiment. Private First Class Kopsolias distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 18 July 1968 while serving as the driver of an armored personnel carrier during a mounted sweep through a rubber plantation near Loc Ninh. His troop was engaged by a North Vietnamese Army company firing small arms, automatic weapons and anti-tank rockets. Private Kopsolias directed his vehicle in a counter assault on the attacking force, taking the lead when the sole track in front of him was hit and totally disabled. Two enemy rockets detonated against his carrier, wounding everyone inside. Private Kopsolias called for a medic and together they removed the seriously injured commander, gave him first aid and then carried him over a hundred meters to an evacuation vehicle. Completely disregarding his safety, Private Kopsolias then returned to his track and for more than twenty minutes defended it alone by constantly firing his fifty caliber machine gun into the enemy positions. When twenty-five North Vietnamese soldiers began an assault on his position he fired the gun into their midst, slaying several and dispersing the rest. He took complete command of the vehicle when replacements were sent to aid him. Despite another wound received when the track was again hit by a rocket-propelled grenade, he remained in charge until the battle ended. Private First Class Kopsolias' extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 5028 (October 29, 1968)

KORTE, CHELSE C.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Chelse C. Korte, Second Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company A, 1st Battalion, 61st Infantry, 1st Infantry Brigade, 5th Infantry Division (Mechanized). Second Lieutenant Korte distinguished himself while serving as leader of a weapons platoon during the defense of a night perimeter just south of the Demilitarized Zone. Early that morning, waves of North Vietnamese regulars assaulted Lieutenant Korte's position under cover of rocket-propelled grenade, mortar, and automatic weapons fire. Although hit in the abdomen by an enemy round early in the fighting, Lieutenant Korte refused medical aid and continued to direct the return fire of his men. When the blast of a rocket-propelled grenade threw one of his men outside the perimeter, Lieutenant Korte, though weakened by his own wound, moved through a hail of enemy fire to his fallen comrade and pulled him back within the perimeter. Lieutenant Korte attempted to administer first aid to the wounded soldier, but he lapsed into unconsciousness from exhaustion and loss of blood. When he regained consciousness, Lieutenant Korte ordered the medical aidman treating his wound to attend to the soldier he had just retrieved. He then staggered off to the perimeter and resumed command of his defenses. Sighting two enemy soldiers firing from behind a clump of bushes, Lieutenant Korte summoned a rifleman to his side and gave the soldier two hand grenades. He then stood up in the open to attract the attention of the enemy soldiers. As the two enemy rose to open fire, Lieutenant Korte's companion hurled his grenades and killed both enemy soldiers. Noticing then that machine gunners on the perimeter were low on ammunition, Lieutenant Korte three times crawled over thirty meters under fire to the gun emplacements with re-supplies of ammunition. Despite Lieutenant Korte's determined efforts to hold air the enemy onrush, one side of the perimeter was about to be overrun. Lieutenant Korte then crawled to the other side of the perimeter and ordered reinforcements to the endangered aide. While deploying these troops to defensive positions, Lieutenant Korte collapsed unconscious on the battlefield. Emboldened by Lieutenant Korte's indomitable fighting spirit, his men, though overwhelmingly outnumbered, emerged from their foxholes and charged the enemy attackers. So stunned were the enemy that they broke contact and fled, leaving over a hundred dead and wounded on the battlefield. Second Lieutenant Korte's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 835 (April 8, 1970)

*KOSKI, RICHARD ARNE
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Richard Arne Koski (0-5424564), First Lieutenant (Artillery), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Battery A, 3d Battalion, 34th Artillery, 9th Infantry Division. First Lieutenant Koski distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 8 March 1968 as artillery forward observer with an infantry unit during an airmobile assault mission near My Tho. The helicopter formation received a devastating volume of automatic weapons and machine gun fire as it arrived at the landing zone, and only Lieutenant Koski's ship and one other aircraft were able to discharge their passengers onto the battlefield. The insurgents immediately pressed a furious assault on the outnumbered friendly forces with savage rocket, mortar and small arms fire. Braving the withering fusillade, Lieutenant Koski called for artillery support and skillfully adjusted the fire to within twenty-five meters of the defenders' perimeter. Shrapnel and enemy bullets struck all around him, but he moved into the open time after time to locate Viet Cong emplacements and destroy them with deadly strikes. Seriously wounded by an exploding enemy round, he fearlessly continued his mission until he succumbed to his injuries. His gallant and selfless actions in the heat of battle were instrumental in repelling the determined hostile attack and forcing the insurgents to withdraw. First Lieutenant Koski's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 2869 (June 17, 1968)
Home Town: Pengilly, Minnesota

*KOTRC, JAMES CARL
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to James Carl Kotrc (508-42-2472), Captain (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company D, 2d Battalion, 27th Infantry, 25th Infantry Division. Captain Kotrc distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 29 July 1969 while commanding an airborne assault mission to reinforce a beleaguered Civilian Defense Group. When his unit began to receive hostile fire after disembarking from helicopters, Captain Kotrc quickly organized his men to sweep toward the enemy positions. As his company closed on the bunkers concealed in a hedgerow at the edge of a rice paddy, he encountered a wounded American advisor to whom he rendered emergency aid. After a medic arrived, Captain Kotrc directed gunship fire on the enemy and then rallied his men to drive the communists from their bunkers. During this valiant maneuver, Captain Kotrc was severely wounded, but he refused medical attention and continued to direct his men in taking a bunker system in a second hedgerow some seventy-five meters beyond the first. Advancing to the enemy emplacement through a barrage of rifle fire, he threw a grenade into the hedgerow. Although his feat succeeded in breaking the enemy stronghold, he was fatally wounded by hostile fire. Captain Kotrc's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 3787 (October 7, 1969)
Home Town: Omaha, Nebraska

KRATZER, WILLIAM M.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to William M. Kratzer, Staff Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Vietnam Team 2, United States Military Assistance Command, Vietnam. Staff Sergeant Kratzer distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 21 April 1971 while serving as Heavy Weapons Advisor at Fire Support Base Honey in Quang Ngai Province. On the morning of the date cited, an enemy sapper force succeeded in breaching the defenses of the fire base under cover of rocket, mortar and small arms fire. Sergeant Kratzer immediately moved to assist the ARVN battalion commander in repulsing the attack. Upon leaving the protection of his bunker, he was thrown to the ground by a grenade blast which wounded him in both arms. Continuing to move under fire, he received a gunshot wound which shattered his leg bone. Despite his painful wounds and loss of blood, Sergeant Kratzer dragged himself some 40 meters uphill past destroyed and burning bunkers until he reached an ARVN artillery position where he requested a radio in order to establish communications with his parent unit. As he waited for the radio, a nearby ammunition bunker exploded, inflicting still more wounds on him and causing a partial loss of hearing. Although suffering from shock, pain and loss of blood, Sergeant Kratzer secured the radio and called in support for the beleaguered outpost. He continued to advise supporting elements of the tactical situation until he lost consciousness from his wounds. Thanks to his heroic efforts, helicopter gunships arrived in time to drive off the attackers and inflict heavy casualties on the enemy. Staff Sergeant Kratzer's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 2950 (October 19, 1971)

*KRECKEL, JOHN WILLIAM
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to John William Kreckel (392-50-0198), Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company A, 2d Battalion, 506th Infantry, 3d Brigade, 101st Airborne Division (Airmobile). Sergeant Kreckel distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 22 July 1970 while serving as a squad leader during an intense enemy attack at Fire Support Base Ripcord. Soon after the enemy initiated their attack on the base, the allies were forced to withdraw from their hilltop location to organize a counter-offensive. As they prepared to assault the enemy, the allied element began receiving intense fire from an enemy machine gun emplacement located on higher terrain. Without hesitation, Sergeant Kreckel ran into the fire-swept area and began administering aid to wounded allied soldiers. He then organized several companions into an assault force and led them up the hill toward the enemy position. As the assault force neared the enemy emplacement, intense fire forced them to take cover. At this time, Sergeant Kreckel observed a companion standing directly in the line of fire of an enemy weapon. Leaving his covered position, the sergeant ran to the soldier and pushed him to safety but was simultaneously killed by the enemy fusillade. Sergeant Kreckel's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 5063 (November 12, 1970)
Home Town: Milwaukee, Wisconsin

*KRUPINSKI, RAYMOND JOHN
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Raymond John Krupinski (170-40-5758), First Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company B, 1st Battalion, 12th Cavalry, 1st Cavalry Division (Airmobile). First Lieutenant Krupinski distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 30 April 1969 while serving as platoon leader of a patrol operating in Binh Long Province. As he was positioning his men in an ambush formation, an enemy force opened fire with automatic weapons and rockets. He immediately directed retaliatory fire and called the medics to administer aid to the wounded. As he and his machine gun crew were attempting to move in on a hostile emplacement, the assistant gunner was wounded as well as the medical aidman who tried to reach him. Lieutenant Krupinski quickly proceeded to remove the wounded gunner. As he was pulling the man to safety, he was wounded. Refusing medical treatment, he returned to the area to recover the medic. As he was heroically attempting to rescue the injured man, he was mortally wounded by enemy fire. First Lieutenant Krupinski's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 2527 (July 12, 1969)
Home Town: Erie, Pennsylvania

*KUNZ, ANTHONY EDWARD (MIA)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Anthony Edward Kunz (US54374076), Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company C, 1st Battalion, 8th Infantry, 4th Infantry Division. Sergeant Kunz distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 4 May 1967 while serving as pointman with an infantry company during a search and destroy mission near the Cambodian border. When his unit engaged a Viet Cong force, Sergeant Kunz moved fearlessly from one man to another to position them and direct their fire. He organized his element into a small perimeter and began to locate hostile positions. As he moved about, he received a serious abdominal wound, but continued inflict casualties on the enemy. When the Viet Cong tried to envelop his company, Sergeant Kunz spotted three insurgents moving toward his perimeter to set up a sniper position. He ran to engage them and killed them all with a burst of rifle fire. As he made his way back to his unit's perimeter, Sergeant Kunz was fired upon by two machine gun emplacements. Still bleeding and in pain from his previous wound, he pulled himself forward using vines and undergrowth to within hand grenade range of the enemy positions. He then got to his feet and threw a grenade which destroyed both hostile weapons. Sergeant Kunz was morally wounded in the tremendous outburst of fire that followed this courageous act. Sergeant Kunz's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 3883 (July 29, 1967)
Home Town: Kerrville, Texas

KURZ, ALFRED
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Alfred Kurz (RA19852039), Private First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company A, 2d Battalion (Airborne), 327th Infantry, 1st Brigade, 101st Airborne Division (Airmobile). Private First Class Kurz distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 16 April 1968 as a rifleman during a search and clear mission near Phu Bai. While his platoon was moving through dense jungle it encountered heavy enemy fire and the lead man was critically wounded. Private Kurz was second in the formation and although wounded in the initial barrage, he unleashed a heavy volume of retaliatory fire which forced the aggressors to remain under cover. Despite the vicious enemy fusillade he then attempted to carry his stricken comrade to safety. Suddenly an enemy grenade landed within three feet of him and, with complete disregard for his own life, he picked it up and attempted to throw it back at the communists. As he released the deadly missile it detonated, seriously wounding him. His quick action, however, saved the lives of five soldiers who were within ten meters of the grenade. Private First Class Kurz's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 169 (January 16, 1969)

KYLES, BOBBY W.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Bobby W. Kyles (US54443505), Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company A, 2d Battalion, 7th Cavalry, 3d Brigade, 1st Cavalry Division (Airmobile). Specialist Four Kyles distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 27 February 1969 while serving as senior radio operator on a reconnaissance-in-force mission northeast of Bien Hoa. While traversing a woody knoll, his company encountered an attack from hostile small arms and automatic weapons fire. When two men fell wounded, Specialist Kyles and his company commander rushed forward to place suppressive fire on the enemy, allowing the downed men to be moved back. Even as he returned fire, Specialist Kyles established communication to the command post for his company commander. During the next assault, which penetrated the communists' position, the company commander was wounded, and Specialist Kyles braved a hail of bullets to assist in bandaging the injured officer. The company, moving under supporting artillery fire, assaulted the enemy a third time. Suddenly an aerial rocket struck an enemy rocket cache located directly in front of the company command group and the first platoon. In the resultant explosion, seventeen soldiers were wounded, including the company commander, the forward artillery observer, and Specialist Kyles. Realizing that the commander was temporarily out of action, Specialist Kyles contacted the gun ships and adjusted their target zone further to the front. Disregarding his painful chest and abdominal wounds, he encouraged the company to press on, thereby enabling the wounded to be removed to safety. He then radioed the battalion command post requesting replacements for the company commander, the forward artillery observer and two radiomen. Turning his attention to tactics, he helped coordinate and stabilize the friendly ground actions and provided the command post with accurate and timely information. Only after the enemy began withdrawing and the level of fighting subsided did he allow himself to be evacuated for medical treatment with the other wounded. Specialist Four Kyles' extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 1957 (June 4, 1969)

L

*LAIER, STEPHEN EUGENE
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Stephen Eugene Laier (RA16815481), Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam. On 4 February 1966, Specialist Laier, a radio telephone operator, of the 3d Platoon, Company A, 1st Battalion, 16th Infantry, 1st Infantry Division, was accompanying his platoon on a night combat operation in the vicinity of Lai Khe, Republic of Vietnam. At approximately 1745 hours, an insurgent force of unknown strength, utilizing antipersonnel mines and small arms fire as a prime means of their offensive, ambushed the platoon causing them to suffer heavy casualties. During the initial insurgent assault, Specialist Laier was seriously wounded from the effects of a mine which severed his legs from his body and knocked his radio off frequency. Despite the intense surging pain from his serious wounds, Specialist Laier fought off unconsciousness, recalibrated his radio, and established contact with higher headquarters to request assistance for his besieged platoon. As a result of his request, troop laden helicopters were dispatched to the battle areas. As the friendly aircraft approached the site, Specialist Laier directed their landing to his position, which at that time was relatively safe from the Viet Cong assault. With darkness drawing near, he directed the relief elements to the other besieged platoon members in order to effect their timely and safe evacuation. Specialist Laier later died as a result of his mortal wounds. His extraordinary heroism, gallantry in action, and supreme sacrifice were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Arm and reflect great credit upon himself and the military service.
Headquarters, US Army, Pacific, General Orders No. 91 (April 22, 1966)
Home Town: Fort Wayne, Indiana

LANDRY, ROBERT M.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Robert M. Landry (0-5336519), First Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company D, 3d Battalion, 21st Infantry, 196th Infantry Brigade, Americal Division. First Lieutenant Landry distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 8 and 9 January 1968. While in pursuit of a group of North Vietnamese Army soldiers, his company came under heavy mortar, automatic weapons and small arms fire. Lieutenant Landry immediately regrouped his scattered troops, and then went forward alone to reconnoiter the area. Finding no suitable avenue of attack against the enemy, he began to withdraw his men. As they maneuvered toward the company command post, he spotted a sizeable enemy force penetrating deep into the company's flank. After directing his troops to cover, he called in artillery strikes and directed them until the aggressors were dispersed. He then reorganized his men and proceeded to the command post. The commanding officer had been killed in the attack, and Lieutenant Landry reorganized the company and secured a landing zone for an evacuation helicopter. Personally directing mortar fire and his maneuver elements, he repeatedly exposed himself to intense hostile fire to supervise the evacuation of his wounded. His unit next joined forces with another company for an assault on the enemy positions. As they attacked, the North Vietnamese opened fire with mortars, automatic weapons, and small arms. Lieutenant Landry ordered his men to withdraw while he stayed in his position, relaying changes in artillery deflection to the forward observer. He returned to his unit only after both companies had safely reached their defensive positions. On the morning on 9 January, Lieutenant Landry was in charge of a reserve force. Two sister companies came under intensive enemy fire, and one sustained heavy casualties on its left flank. He maneuvered his troops across an open rice paddy, plugged the gap in the unit's flank, and drove the attackers back. Constantly exposing himself to a continuing hostile barrage, he directed supporting fires until the battered company had safely broken all contact. Despite concentrated fire directed at him, Lieutenant Landry held his position until both sister companies had established defensive positions and all his own men had withdrawn. Through his leadership he maintained the integrity of his unit throughout the twenty-four hours of sustained heavy combat. First Lieutenant Landry's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 4340 (September 12, 1968)
Home Town: San Antonio, Texas

*LANE, JOHN TIMOTHY
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to John Timothy Lane (US56986266), Private First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company B, 4th Battalion, 9th Infantry, 1st Brigade, 25th Infantry Division. Private First Class Lane distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 6 May 1968 while serving as a rifleman during an operation near Duc Hoa. His unit had just established its night defensive position when an enemy force began to infiltrate the friendly lines. Private Lane and three men with him moved to a secondary defensive position situated in a small depression. An enemy soldier hurled a grenade into their location. With complete disregard for his safety, Private Lane threw himself on the grenade as it detonated. The explosion killed him instantly and wounded one of his comrades. By his self-sacrifice, Private Lane saved the lives of his fellow soldiers at the cost of his own. Private First Class Lane's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 4322 (September 11, 1968)
Home Town: Brewster, Washington

*LASATER, LUTHER MCKINDREE, III
Synopsis:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Luther McKindree Lasater, III (462747173), Captain (Corps of Engineers), U.S. Army (Reserve), for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with the Troop F, 9th Cavalry, 3d Brigade, 1st Cavalry Division. Captain Lasater distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 13 February 1972. His extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Department of the Army, General Orders No. 13 (May 3, 1973)
Born: February 16, 1947 at Fort Worth, Texas
Home Town: Garland, Texas
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LAWRENCE, STEPHEN E.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Stephen E. Lawrence, Chief Warrant Officer (W-2), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in action in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with 135th Aviation Company (Assault Helicopter), 22d Aviation Battalion (Combat), 1st Aviation Brigade. Chief Warrant Officer Lawrence distinguished himself while serving as aircraft commander of a light fire team supporting medical evacuation operations at Fire Support Base Pace and Fire Support Base Alpha. In response to an emergency call from another helicopter going down in flames as the result of enemy anti-aircraft fire, Chief Warrant Officer Lawrence, without regard for his personal safety, decided to attempt a rescue of the downed crew. The area near the burning aircraft was one of known enemy concentration, but his expertise in handling the aircraft enabled him to land safely. While on the ground, he and his crew exposed themselves to enemy ground fire in an attempt to locate the downed crew. Enemy fire forced him to take-off prematurely, but he returned to the area a second time to pick up the crew. The aircraft continued to receive a heavy concentration of small arms fire while the downed crew boarded; and, it increased as he piloted his helicopter from the area. Chief Warrant Officer Lawrence's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 873 (May 1, 1972)
Born: at Virginia Beach, Virginia
Home Town: Clearwater, Florida

LAWRENCE, WILLIAM, JR.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to William Lawrence, Jr., Sergeant First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company C, 2d Battalion, 501st Infantry, 101st Airborne Division (Airmobile). Platoon Sergeant Lawrence distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 19 June 1969 while serving as leader of a platoon securing Fire Support Base Tomahawk south of Hue. Shortly after midnight, the entire base perimeter was subjected to fierce attack by a reinforced battalion of North Vietnamese. During the initial mortar and rocket barrage, Sergeant Lawrence was wounded in the face from shrapnel, but despite his wound, he ran from bunker to bunker, directing fire, administering first aid and engaging enemy sappers with grenade and rifle fire. After repelling the sappers who had penetrated the perimeter, Sergeant Lawrence undertook the mission of re-securing an outpost which had been completely overrun and occupied by the enemy force. He quickly organized a small squad and began assaulting the outpost located on a hilltop approximately one hundred meters from the perimeter. As his men began moving up the slope, they came under heavy rocket-propelled grenade fire. Despite wounds in both arms, he continued to lead his squad in a final charge to recapture the outpost. He then set up a hasty defense around the hilltop, had the casualties returned to the main perimeter for evacuation, and held the outpost against additional hostile assaults. Platoon Sergeant Lawrence's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 102 (January 12, 1970)

LAWTON, JOHN P.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to John P. Lawton (0-5318366), Captain (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company A, 2d Battalion (Airborne), 327th Infantry, 1st Brigade, 101st Air Cavalry Division. Captain Lawton distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 8 October 1967 as the commander of an infantry company during a mission near Chu Lai. He received word that his second platoon had been heavily attacked in an open rice field by an estimated North Vietnamese Army company firing automatic weapons and mortars and had suffered many casualties. He maneuvered another of his platoons to a position from which he could observe the battle and, after a quick estimate of the situation, called for a relief force from a sister company. Not waiting for its arrival, he personally led one squad of his force toward the beleaguered platoon while the remaining squads set up a base of fire to cover the movement. Upon reaching a woodline flanking the rice field, Captain Lawton could see that the trapped platoon's casualties were exposed to an extremely intense cross fire from three enemy machine guns and realized that they had to be recovered immediately. Despite the withering fire and exploding mortar rounds he charged across fifty meters of open rice paddy. As he ran toward the injured men, he received multiple wounds in the leg, arm and chest from a hail of enemy machine gun bullets. Disregarding his severe wounds, he continued to crawl to the casualties, only to discover that they were all either dead or so seriously wounded that they couldn't be moved easily. For a full forty-five minutes he single handedly held the attackers at bay and prevented them from searching the dead or capturing the wounded. He than began directing his men in an attempt to rescue as many of the surviving casualties as possible. He placed suppressive fire on the insurgents to cover his troops' maneuver until he ran out of ammunition and his position was overrun. Captain Lawton, with a burst of reserve energy, lunged forward to grab a weapon from on the enemy, but was wounded for the fourth time and left for dead. Through his courageous actions he had delayed the enemy force to such an extent that when the relief force arrived moments later the attackers were caught in the open and were quickly routed, suffering heavy casualties. Captain Lawton's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 3967 (August 15, 1968)

*LECHUGA, MARTIN
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Martin Lechuga (RA15960755), Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 1st Battalion (Mechanized), 5th Infantry, 25th Infantry Division. Specialist Four Lechuga distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 11 April 1969 while serving as a rifleman with a platoon operating in Hau Nghia Province. His platoon was carrying out an intelligence mission when the lead man detected an enemy ambush in time to warn his comrades. A fire fight erupted, and the hostile forces were routed. Wishing to maintain contact with the fleeing enemy, the platoon pressed forward. On entering a wooded area, the friendly element cam under an enfilade from automatic weapons, rifle grenades, and mortars. On identifying the source of enemy fire to the left flank, Specialist Lechuga and a comrade began moving toward the emplacement. Just as they silenced the enemy position, they received heavy fire from another enemy fortification, which seriously wounded Specialist Lechuga's comrade. Realizing that the hostile fusillade prevented his pulling the wounded man to safety, he placed himself in front of his comrade and began returning a hail of rifle fire. As a result of his attempt to save his fellow soldier's life, he was fatally wounded by enemy fire. Specialist Four Lechuga's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 2025 (June 9, 1968)
Home Town: San Antonio, Texas

LEDBETTER, WILLIAM, JR.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to William Ledbetter, Jr., Master Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Detachment B-20, Company B, 5th Special Forces Group (Airborne), 1st Special Forces. Master Sergeant Ledbetter distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions from 16 to 19 May 1970 while advising a Vietnamese mobile strike force element during search and clear operations in Kontum Province. After six days of searching for suspected enemy activity in mountainous jungle terrain surrounding Dak Seang Special Forces camp, an element of the mobile strike force came into contact with a large, well entrenched enemy force. Reacting immediately, Sergeant Ledbetter led a group of reinforcements to the contact area to support the embattled allies. During the ensuing engagement, the sergeant crawled twenty-five meters across fire swept terrain to rescue a seriously wounded comrade. After contact was broken, Sergeant Ledbetter deployed his men to a night defensive position and directed the helicopter evacuation of the wounded. The following morning, the enemy launched an intense attack on the allied position that lasted for over two days. Throughout this attack, Sergeant Ledbetter exposed himself to intense enemy fire in order to personally direct the defensive efforts of his men. During the violent enemy ground assaults that characterized the attack, the sergeant was continuously at the point of heaviest contact encouraging his men and engaging the enemy with all resources available to him. When the allies ran perilously low on ammunition, Sergeant Ledbetter directed a helicopter resupply operation and exposed himself to intense hostile fire in order to unload and distribute the ammunition to his men. On the final day of contact, the allies broke through the enemy encirclement and Sergeant Ledbetter assumed rear security responsibilities. Directing allied artillery strikes to within thirty meters of his position, the sergeant held the enemy at bay while his men moved toward Camp Dak Seang. Then, when the lead allied element was contacted by another enemy force, the sergeant skillfully maneuvered his men around the enemy's flank in order to reach the safety of the Special Forces camp. Master Sergeant Ledbetter's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 5111 (November 20, 1970)

LEDFORS, FREDERICK D.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Frederick D. Ledfors, Captain (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force while serving as Pilot of a Light Observation Helicopter in the Republic of Vietnam. Captain Ledfors distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 11 July 1972 while flying his light observation helicopter on a voluntary rescue mission behind enemy lines north of Quang Tri City, Republic of Vietnam, on 11 July 1972. Captain Ledfors was serving as the scout team leader of an emergency rescue mission when he and his wingman were engaged by extremely intense small arms, automatic weapons, 23-mm. and 37-mm. antiaircraft fires, and heat seeking missiles. In spite of the intensity and ferocity of the voluminous hostile fire, he continued his flight in search of the downed American crewmen. During his search, Captain Ledfors continually returned fire for fire with the hostile ground forces in the area. He successfully located the crash survivors in a bomb crater, descended into the confined area and hovered to their position, skillfully maneuvering his aircraft to avoid the hostile fire coming from a known North Vietnamese Army regimental stronghold surrounding the survivors' position. After three of the survivors were placed aboard his aircraft, Captain Ledfors attempted to depart the landing zone. However, finding his aircraft excessively overloaded, he instructed his wingman to depart ahead of him so that should he not be able to clear the area, at least his wingman would get clear. Utilizing extraordinary skill and experience, Captain Ledfors was able to coax every bit of power from his straining engine and fly clear of the battle area, again breaching the barricade of intense hostile fire. Immediately realizing that he would be unable to remain airborne with his excessive load, he accomplished an extremely hazardous night landing into a relatively secure rice paddy and transferred the survivors to another aircraft. Through his indomitable courage, total disregard for personal safety and inspiring leadership, Captain Ledfors was responsible for the successful rescue of five American air crewmen and one Vietnamese marine all of whom were severely burned or wounded and prevented their certain capture or death at the hands of the enemy. Captain Ledfors' conspicuous gallantry, extraordinary heroism and intrepidity at the risk of his own life, above and beyond the call of duty, are in the highest traditions of the United States Army and reflect great credit upon himself and the Armed Forces of his country.
Department of the Army, General Orders No. 5 (February 10, 1975)

*LEHEW, DONALD LEE
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Donald Lee Lehew (RA13479761), Sergeant First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Detachment A-430, 5th Special Forces Group (Airborne), 1st Special Forces. Sergeant First Class Lehew distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 26 August 1966 as intelligence sergeant of a Special Forces unit conducting a mission on Phu Quoc Island. Following a sweeping action on a fortified hill, Sergeant Lehew skillfully deployed his troops to break up an enemy ambush. Under intense small arms fire, he helped move a wounded comrade to a safe position where he administered first aid to the man. While helping his detachment commander evacuate the dead and wounded from the battlefield after the engagement, he detected a hidden enemy bunker. A Viet Cong soldier began firing from the position, and Sergeant Lehew pushed his commander to the ground, saving the officer's life. As his unit maneuvered to join a relief force, he placed himself among the force's leading elements. After moving a short distance, two Viet Cong companies opened fire from entrenched positions, momentarily disorganizing his troops. Sergeant Lehew, by exemplary leadership, was able to rally his men and direct a tremendous volume of fire into the attackers. Refusing to pull back to a less exposed position, he instead charged alone into the enemy fusillade, deliberately assaulting the main insurgent position. He was mortally wounded while fearlessly and unselfishly placing the welfare of his men above his own in the heat of battle. His quick action threw the Viet Cong off balance long enough for air support to arrive and prevent the friendly force from being overwhelmed. Sergeant First Class Lehew's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, where in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 3683 (August 1, 1968)
Home Town: Salem, New Jersey

LEMONDS, GARY L.
Synopsis:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Gary L. Lemonds, Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company F, 75th Infantry, 25th Infantry Division. Sergeant Lemonds distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 9 April 1968. His extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 2948 (1969)
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LEPEILBET, ANDREW R.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Andrew R. LePeilbet, First Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company A, 1st Battalion, 8th Infantry, 4th Infantry Division. Lieutenant LePeilbet distinguished himself while serving as platoon leader in the Plei Trap Valley in the Central Highlands. On 12 March 1969, two platoons of his unit came under a devastating barrage of small arms, automatic weapons, and grenade fire from a North Vietnamese force concealed in well constructed bunkers. As his element sustained heavy casualties, Lieutenant LePeilbet courageously moved forward to engage the nearest bunker with grenade fire. Suddenly an enemy grenade landed a few feet from him and his radio operator. Without hesitation, he placed himself between his radio operator and the device, taking the full force of the explosion which hurled him to the ground and inflicted crippling leg and back wounds. Under orders to join with the main element, Lieutenant LePeilbet organized and integrated the platoon, supervised construction of litters for the wounded and, meter by meter, maneuvered his men through two hundred meters of bullet-strafed terrain. Under his dauntless direction, his men suppressed the enemy, but the communists massed to launch an all-out attack. As the enemy sought to over- run the element, Lieutenant LePeilbet tenaciously checked the perimeter, supervised the evacuation of the wounded to places of safety, and redeployed his men. Through his determination, the enemy was repelled. First Lieutenant LePeilbet's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 4371 (December 6, 1969)

LEWIS, JOHN J.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to John J. Lewis (0-5337275), First Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company B, 2d Battalion, 12th Cavalry, 3d Brigade, 1st Cavalry Division. First Lieutenant Lewis distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 3 and 4 February 1968 as an infantry platoon leader during the campaign to regain control of the city of Hue. During an engagement with strong forward elements of a North Vietnamese Army regiment, his battalion charged across an open area against well entrenched enemy forces concealed in the woodline on the far side. As Lieutenant Lewis' company neared the woodline, a heavy volume of accurate small arms fire struck the unit and temporarily halted its advance. Lieutenant Lewis quickly organized a squad of volunteers to maneuver against the fortified emplacements. Moving from his covered position, he led the team across open ground. At a slight rise, he deployed his men as a fire support element and continued on alone to a point within hand grenade range of the insurgents' bunkers. He then began to destroy the positions one by one with grenades and small arms fire. As each bunker was eliminated, the enemy desperately directed more and more fire at him, but he continued his mission until all the bunkers were destroyed. Lieutenant Lewis then began to supervise the medical evacuation of the wounded. As he did so, he observed the litter bearers come under heavy volume of fire. He secured all available smoke grenades and moved forward to provide covering smoke for the rescue teams. Early the next morning, the enemy regiment received reinforcements and attacked the friendly force's perimeter. Lieutenant Lewis' section received the brunt of the assault. Through his outstanding leadership his unit was able to repulse each enemy advance and inflict heavy casualties upon the attackers. The friendly forces then made a tactical withdrawal. Lieutenant Lewis once again organized and led a party of volunteers to retrieve wounded from the bullet-swept forward edge of the battle area. With the cover of a smoke screen he had established, he ran across open ground three times, carrying out wounded and equipment. Lieutenant Lewis' extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 3674 (July 31, 1968)

*LHOTA, ROBERT ALLAN
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Robert Allan Lhota (ER23769625), Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company D, 1st battalion, 11th Infantry, 1st Brigade, 5th Infantry Division (Mechanized). Specialist Four Lhota distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 21 September 1968 while serving as an assistant machine gunner on a search and destroy mission in Quang Tri Province. His platoon was suddenly attacked by an enemy force occupying well concealed bunkers, and became pinned down by the aggressors' cross fire. Specialist Lhota took a machine gun from a wounded man and placed effective fire on the hostile emplacements, enabling his fellow soldiers to begin a withdrawal. The enemy concentrated on his position, and he was seriously wounded by a rocket that exploded next to him. Refusing to be evacuated, he continued to man the machine gun until he was hit a second time and his weapon was damaged. A comrade attempted to carry him to safety, but Specialist Lhota resisted, and instead began shooting his rifle at the communists. He was struck again by the hostile fusillade and was mortally wounded. Through bravery and self-sacrifice most of the platoon escaped the murderous barrage. Specialist Lhota's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 5470 (November 27, 1968)
Home Town: Monessen, Pennsylvania

*LIEBESPECK, JAMES WARREN
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to James Warren Liebespeck (RA27551259), Staff Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with 588th Engineer Battalion (Combat). Staff Sergeant Liebespeck distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on a minesweeping operation near Dau Tieng, Republic of Vietnam, on 21 May 1968. Sergeant Liebespeck was serving as a squad leader in a Combat Engineer company and was sweeping a heavily traveled main supply route to allow re-supply convoys to move through. In the process of the mine sweep Sergeant Liebespeck found a large piece of metal. He checked for booby traps and then raised the medal, exposing and activating a grenade. Sergeant Liebespeck, hearing a warning from a fellow squad member, dropped the piece of metal. Approximately four steps away and nearing safety, Sergeant Liebespeck, recognizing the danger to his men, turned and ran back to the grenade. As he reached to pick it up the grenade exploded. Through his indomitable courage, complete disregard for his own safety, and profound concern for his fellow soldiers, he averted possible loss of life and injury to the members of his squad. Sergeant Liebespeck's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Department of the Army, General Orders No. 80 (December 16, 1968)
Born: January 29, 1936 at La Puente, California
Home Town: La Puente, California

LINDEMANN, EDWARD W.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Edward W. Lindemann, Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company C, 4th Medical Battalion, 4th Infantry Division. Specialist Four Lindemann distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 26 April 1970 while serving as a medical aidman on a long range reconnaissance patrol operating deep within enemy controlled territory. Shortly after initiating contact with a hostile force of unknown size, an enemy hand grenade landed next to Specialist Lindemann. Without hesitation, the specialist warned his nearby comrades and threw himself on the grenade to shield his companions. Although the grenade did not detonate, he remained on top of it until all his companions reached safety. He then gently lifted himself from the device and continued his mission. Specialist Four Lindemann's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 4197 (1970)

LINDSAY, DAVID J.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to David J. Lindsay, Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company E, 3d Battalion (Airmobile) 506th Infantry, 101st Airborne Division. Sergeant Lindsay distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 23 and 24 January 1970 while serving as a team leader of a six man reconnaissance patrol in Binh Dinh Province. While set up in a night defense perimeter, Sergeant Lindsay's patrol came under heavy attack by an estimated platoon size force of North Vietnamese regulars. He quickly led his team to the cover of a nearby boulder formation and then engaged the enemy. Form an unprotected position atop a boulder, Sergeant Lindsay directed supporting artillery fire which successfully silenced the enemy attack for the remainder of the night. By morning the enemy force had received reinforcements and resumed the attack on Sergeant Lindsay's position. Sergeant Lindsay dashed to within fifteen meters of the enemy to retrieve badly needed ammunition, at the same time drawing enemy fire so that the supporting helicopter gunships could pinpoint the enemy positions. During the ensuing battle, he repeatedly moved out to engage the enemy, throwing hand grenades while directing and encouraging his men. While moving forward to set up a claymore mine, enemy small arms fire struck a smoke grenade which he had fastened to his leg. Despite the pain caused by the ignited grenade, he detonated the mine and silenced the enemy fire in that vicinity. Learning that a comrade had been wounded and realizing that the enemy now had the team completely surrounded, he directed helicopter gunships to fire extremely close to his team and unselfishly threw his own body over the wounded man to protect him. The gunfire proved effective and forced the enemy to flee. Sergeant Lindsay's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 1579 (June 3, 1970)

LINDSAY, JAMES J.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to James J. Lindsay (0-75235), Lieutenant Colonel (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Headquarters, 2d Battalion, 60th Infantry, 1st Brigade, 9th Infantry Division. Lieutenant Colonel Lindsay distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions from 31 May to 4 June 1968 during an operation which located and destroyed three main force Viet Cong and North Vietnamese battalions in the Plain of Reeds. After two days of tracking the enemy, Colonel Lindsay accompanied his battalion as it was inserted by air into the flank of the communists. Immediately upon landing, his men were brought under extremely heavy automatic weapons and small arms fire from a nearby woodline. Moving from position to position under the hail of bullets, he directed his troops' fire and, once fire superiority had been gained, led an assault into the hostile bunker complex which destroyed sixty of the fortifications and forced the enemy to withdraw. He then entered his helicopter and flew low over the embattled area to direct the encirclement of the foe. Noticing a group of Viet Cong escaping across a small canal which had not yet been sealed off, he stopped them with hand grenades and rifle fire. After returning to the ground, he exposed himself to the vicious enemy fusillade to coordinate return fire which repelled the enemy's attempt to break the encirclement. While leading a sweep through the woodline early in the morning of 4 June, he surprised three Viet Cong whom he engaged and killed before they could inflict any casualties upon his men. Lieutenant Colonel Lindsay's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 461 (February 10, 1969)

LINES, WILLIAM, JR.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to William Lines, Jr. (RA19898081), Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 1st Battalion, 28th Infantry, 1st Brigade, 1st Infantry Division. Sergeant Lines distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions 7 May 1968 as a platoon sergeant on a reconnaissance-in-force mission near the village of Thu Duc. He was leading his platoon to the aid of a friendly element which had engaged a numerically superior Viet Cong force. His unit was suddenly subjected to a heavy volume of enemy automatic weapons and machine gun fire as it entered the contested area. Although wounded by the fusillade, Sergeant Lines deployed his men in defensive positions and repeatedly exposed himself to the enemy barrage as he moved among them to direct their suppressive fire. As the Viet Cong intensified their attack, he advanced upon their emplacements, destroying them with accurately thrown hand grenades and bursts of rifle fire. He then rallied his men and led an assault on the communist positions, personally slaying two enemy snipers in close combat. When air support was called for, Sergeant Lines led a squad to an extreme forward position to direct an intense volume of fire upon the enemy, enabling two other elements to withdraw and evacuate their wounded. Through his bravery, the lives of many fellow soldiers were saved and the Viet Cong were totally defeated. Sergeant Line's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 4624 (October 4, 1968)

*LINK, JOHN FRANCIS
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to John Francis Link (RA17731124), Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Detachment B-52, 5th Special Forces Group (Airborne), 1st Special Forces. Specialist Four Link distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 29 March 1968 as Special Forces advisor to a Vietnamese platoon conducting a combat operation in enemy territory. The unit had just completed a helicopter assault into an exposed landing zone when it was subjected to intense automatic weapons, rocket, grenade and mortar fire from an enemy force occupying positions on three sides of the landing zone. Braving a withering hail of hostile fire, Specialist Link raced across the open clearing and removed equipment from two helicopters which had been shot down by the savage fusillade. He placed fierce fire on the enemy and assisted three wounded comrades to the relative safety of a rise of ground at the edge of the landing zone. Continuing to expose himself to the barrage, Specialist Link fearlessly left his unit's hasty defensive perimeter numerous time throughout the raging battle to treat casualties and pull them to cover. He was thrown to the ground and wounded by rocket and mortar fire, but got up and courageously resumed his lifesaving efforts. While shielding the body of a fallen soldier from the ravaging enemy fire, Specialist Link was mortally wounded. Specialist Four Link's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 1840 (April 20, 1968)
Home Town: Ottumwa, Iowa

*LITTLE, WILLIAM F., III
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to William F. Little, III (151-36-4314), First Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company E, 2d Battalion, 3d Infantry, 199th Infantry Brigade. First Lieutenant Little distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous action on 11 November 1969 while serving as platoon leader during a reconnaissance operation southwest of Xuan Loc. After his point element discovered signs of recent enemy activity and three well-concealed enemy bunkers, Lieutenant Little started moving the rest of his platoon forward to the point element. Suddenly a concealed enemy force opened fire with small arms and automatic weapons, Lieutenant Little moved forward through the intense enemy fire to pinpoint the hostile positions. He then called in artillery and gunship support and remained in an exposed position to adjust the supporting fire. During a lull in enemy fire, Lieutenant Little and one of his men began to flank the enemy positions. When he suddenly saw an enemy soldier aiming at his companion Lieutenant Little pushed the unwary soldier to the ground and, in doing so, was seriously wounded. As Lieutenant Little fell to the ground, he fired his weapon and killed the enemy soldier. Almost immediately, Lieutenant Little was subjected to a burst of hostile fire and was mortally wounded. First Lieutenant Little's actions were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 4507 (December 22, 1969)
Home Town: Mountainside, New Jersey

*LITWIN, ROBERT RICHARD
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Robert Richard Litwin (RA11357350), Sergeant First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in action in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company A, 2d Battalion (Airborne), 503d Infantry, 173rd Airborne Brigade (Separate). Platoon Sergeant Litwin distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 22 June 1967 while serving as rifle platoon sergeant of an infantry company on a search and destroy mission near Dak To. His platoon was savagely attacked by a North Vietnamese battalion and pinned down by an intense hail of automatic weapons fire. Seeing his platoon leader killed, Sergeant Litwin stood up in the midst of the raging firefight to rally his men against the numerically superior hostile force. Wounded early in the battle, he refused aid and directed the fire of his men on wave after wave of onrushing enemy soldiers. He heard a cry for help and braved withering fire to race forward of his lines and aid a wounded comrade. Wounded again, he bravely carried the man back to safety under heavy fire. He continued to repel the mass assaults while radioing for air strikes within fifty meters of his positions. He sustained another wound while directing the air and artillery strikes, but continued to refuse aid while fighting furiously to repulse the enemy onslaught. Realizing that his defenses could not last much longer, he moved through the bullet-swept area directing the withdrawal of his men. While evacuating the wounded, he was hit again. Continuing to refuse aid, he sent his men ahead and remained to cover the withdrawal. He was mortally wounded while courageously leading his men in the face of grave danger. Platoon Sergeant Litwin's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 5285 (October 16, 1967)
Home Town: Willimansett, Massachusetts

*LOBACK, THOMAS JOHN
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Thomas John Loback (US52753134), Private First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 1st Battalion (Mechanized), 5th Infantry, 2d Brigade, 25th Infantry Division. Private First Class Loback distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 19 February 1968 as medical aidman for an infantry platoon conducting a reconnaissance-in-force operation near Hoc Mon. His platoon had just moved into a hedgerow when it was subjected to intense small arms, automatic weapons, and rocket fire from a North Vietnamese Army battalion in well fortified positions. One squad was immediately pinned down by the savage barrage and sustained several casualties. Hearing a call for medical aid, Private Loback unhesitatingly crawled forward through a withering hail of bullets and flying shrapnel, treated five wounded troops and assisted them to a position of relative safety. Continuing to brave the ravaging hostile fusillade, he raced across a bullet- swept rice filed to the side of another wounded comrade and skillfully treated him. The soldier had begun moving toward cover when he was hit again by enemy sniper fire. Exposing himself to a curtain of raking machine gun fire, Private Loback fearlessly rushed back to the casualty and treated him a second time. Refusing to abandon his life-saving mission, he began to pull his seriously wounded patient to safety. Private Loback was instantly killed by enemy automatic weapons fire while gallantly placing the welfare of a fellow soldier above his own in the heat of battle. Private First Class Loback's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 1820 (April 19, 1969)
Home Town: New York, New York

LOFTUS, ROBERT
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Robert Loftus, Private First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company B, 3d Battalion, 21st Infantry, 196th Infantry Brigade, Americal Division. Private First Class Loftus distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 20 August 1968 while serving as a medical aidman during a search and destroy mission in the Khe Sanh Valley. When his company received fire from a North Vietnamese bunker complex, Private Loftus immediately ran to the foremost positions to administer aid to four wounded Americans. Although he was subjected to intense hostile fire from close range, and at one point had an enemy round crease his helmet, Private Loftus treated the four soldiers and then carried them to a sheltered position some sixty meters away. Again braving the enemy barrage, he treated and extracted five more comrades from positions which were under fire. While carrying one wounded man from the conflict area, he came under direct fire, and the injured soldier in his arms was struck by another enemy round. Without hesitation, Private Loftus assaulted the hostile emplacement and destroyed it with a hand grenade and continued to evacuate the casualty. Private First Class Loftus' extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 459 (February 17, 1970)

*LONCON, LARRY JOSEPH
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Larry Joseph Loncon (438-80-6526), Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 1st Battalion, 8th Cavalry, 1st Cavalry Division (Airmobile). Specialist Four Loncon distinguished himself while serving as a medical aidman during combat operations in Phuoc Long Province. Specialist Loncon was accompanying a friendly force up a steep, densely vegetated hill when the lead element came under an intense volley of fire from a well entrenched enemy force. Without hesitation, Specialist Loncon advanced through the hostile fire until he reached a seriously wounded soldier in the lead element. While under enemy fire; he skillfully applied first aid to the soldier's wounds and assisted him to a rear position. The Specialist then returned to the forward area of contact to treat two comrades who had been seriously wounded. Although seriously wounded by enemy fire as he treated the two casualties, he continued to treat his comrades and assist them to safety until he collapsed. Specialist Four Loncon's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 4063 (August 31, 1970)
Home Town: New Iberia, Louisiana

*LOPEZ, JOHN EDWARD, JR. (MIA)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to John Edward Lopez, Jr. (554-54-7041), Sergeant First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Detachment A-242, Company B, 5th Special Forces Group (Airborne), 1st Special Forces. Sergeant First Class Lopez distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 7 October 1969 while serving as a Special Forces advisor with a Vietnamese company search and clear mission near Camp Dak Pek. A platoon of his company had been fired upon and pinned down by a well entrenched and concealed enemy force. Sergeant Lopez and a fellow advisor immediately formed a reaction force in an attempt to rescue the trapped platoon. The reaction force no sooner began to maneuver on the enemy when it was caught in an enemy crossfire, and Sergeant Lopez's fellow advisor was mortally wounded. Faced with enemy fire on three sides, Sergeant Lopez quickly formed a defensive perimeter. Moving outside the perimeter, Sergeant Lopez exposed himself to enemy fire in order to recover the body of the other advisor. He then directed and adjusted artillery fire and air strikes on the enemy positions. Personally carrying the body of his companion, Sergeant Lopez led his unit through the three-sided crossfire, but found his route of withdrawal blocked by another enemy company. Sergeant Lopez then directed artillery and gunship fire against the enemy positions until he was able to lead his unit safely through the enemy encirclement. Sergeant First Class Lopez's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 1692 (June 8, 1970)
Home Town: San Jose, California

*LOPEZ, MANUEL TORRES
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Manuel Torres Lopez (RA38707253), Sergeant First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with 5th Special Forces Group (Airborne), 1st Special Forces. Sergeant First Class Lopez distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 27 June 1968 near Moc Hoa, Republic of Vietnam, as platoon leader of an Irregular Mobile Strike Force Company conducting a heliborne insertion into an enemy-occupied landing zone. Upon learning of the critical wounds of a fellow soldier, Sergeant Lopez located and retrieved him by crawling under intense and accurate enemy fire from a nearby woodline. As the unit sustained additional casualties, Sergeant Lopez secured a radio and again crawled forward against intense machinegun fire, mortars and rockets to carry more wounded back to the medical evacuation point. Moving forward a third time, he was knocked unconscious by the concussion of a B-40 rocket. Upon recovering, he refused medical evacuation for himself and moved toward the woodline from where he carried another American and three irregulars to another helicopter under heavy fire. While assisting yet other irregular soldiers pinned down by enemy fire, Sergeant Lopez fell mortally wounded. During the several hours that he moved about the battlefield assisting others, his bravery, courage and determination saved fourteen of his comrades. His continued feats of heroism in the face of certain death inspired his men to whom retreat or hesitation was unnecessary in the knowledge that he was among them. Sergeant Lopez's extraordinary heroism at the cost of his own life, above and beyond the call of duty, are in the highest traditions of the United States Army and reflect great credit upon himself and the military service.
Department of the Army, General Orders No. 8 (February 4, 1969)
Home Town: Oshkosh, Wisconsin

LOSE, CHARLES R.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Charles R. Lose, Specialist Fifth Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism on 14 November and 15 November 1965 in Ia Drang Valley, Republic of Vietnam while serving with Company B, 1st Battalion, 7th Cavalry, 1st Air Cavalry Division. Specialist Five Lose distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 14 and 15 November 1965. As a Medical Aidman, Specialist Lose was serving with the Second Platoon of Company B when the Platoon became pinned down by an intense assault from a battalion size Viet Cog force and then cut off from the remainder of the Company for a period of twenty-six hours. As the enemy's deadly and heavy automatic weapons and small arms fire inflicted several casualties on the Platoon during the initial attack, Specialist Lose bravely moved through the hail of gun fire to care for the wounded. Although he was wounded in the foot by grenade fragments during one of his courageous moves to reach a fallen comrade, he continued to administer to the wounded by crawling from man to man dragging his aid kit with him. When his medical supplies became exhausted, he demonstrated rare ingenuity and determination by fashioning bandages from C-ration resources. He collected water from the canteens of the dead for distribution to the wounded. Again and again, he crawled across the open area and exposed himself to the intense hostile fire to give first aid to the wounded, often using his own body as a shield for the protection of his fellow soldiers. On the following day when a relief force reached the beleaguered unit, he refused to be evacuated until all of the wounded were taken to safety. Specialist Lose's conspicuous gallantry, his extraordinary heroism on the battlefield, and his deep concern for his fellow soldiers are in the highest traditions of the United States and reflect great credit upon himself and the armed forces of his country.
Department of the Army, General Orders No. 42 (October 4, 1966)

LOUCKS, JERRY T., JR.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Jerry T. Loucks, Jr., Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company A, 1st Battalion, 8th Infantry, 4th Infantry Division. Specialist Four Loucks distinguished himself while serving as a rifleman in the Plei Trap Valley of the Central Highlands. On 12 March 1969, two platoons of his company came under a devastating barrage of small arms, automatic weapons and grenades from an enemy force concealed in well-constructed bunkers, suffering heavy casualties. Despite his own wounds, Specialist Loucks immediately assumed command when members of the command group were disabled and he organized a fire-and-movement team to advance through the deadly hail of enemy bullets. He and his team pressed on toward the hostile fortifications, silencing many of the bunkers. When ordered to pull back to the unit's main element, he quickly organized the platoons and supervised the construction of litters to carry the wounded. He then led the beleaguered element through the hostile fusillade. With his coordination, his men temporarily silenced the enemy force, but suddenly the North Vietnamese launched an all-out attack in an attempt to overrun the small element. Rallying his comrades and repositioning them into advantageous defensive positions, Specialist Loucks succeeded in causing the enemy to abort their assault so that the link-up could be completed. Specialist Four Loucks' extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 4345 (December 6, 1969)

LUTCHENDORF, THOMAS E.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Thomas E. Lutchendorf (0-5238134), First Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company D, 2d Battalion, 7th Cavalry, 1st Cavalry Division (Airmobile). First Lieutenant Lutchendorf distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 9 December 1967 as platoon leader of an airmobile cavalry company. His platoon air-assaulted an unsecured landing zone in the mountains north of Phan Thiet and immediately came under intense automatic weapons fire from eight well camouflaged and fortified bunkers. The bunkers were situated on two sides of the landing zone and the other two sides were covered with punji stakes to prevent escape and evasion. Lieutenant Lutchendorf directed his men to move to defilade position as he remained behind to direct air strikes, aerial rocket artillery, and gunship fire into the enemy positions. He repeatedly exposed himself to the deadly insurgent barrage to determine the effectiveness of air strikes, adjust them, and to hurl grenades at the enemy bunkers. Even though enemy mortar rounds began falling around his position. Lieutenant Lutchendorf remained exposed to the fusillade to fix the bunker positions with compass readings to allow more accurate air strikes. Napalm bombs and aerial rocket artillery were able to destroy several of the fortified bunkers due to this action. Although seriously wounded, Lieutenant Lutchendorf stubbornly refused to give up his command or accept medical aid for himself. Throughout the night, he retained control of his men and inspired them to bring constant pressure on the determined enemy. His outstanding leadership was decisive in repelling a superior enemy force and the safe evacuation of his troops. Lieutenant Lutchendorf's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit on him and the U.S. Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 1425 (March 30, 1968)

LYNCH, EUGENE M.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Eugene M. Lynch (0-76891), Colonel (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 2d Brigade, 25th Infantry Division. Colonel Lynch distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 7 October 1968 while serving as Commander, 2d Brigade, 25th Infantry Division. A fierce battle erupted between a well trained North Vietnamese battalion and four companies of American infantrymen. Helicopter gunships provided initial fire support but after an hour of heavy contact were forced to withdraw to rearm and refuel. At this critical moment when it appeared that the enemy would gain fire superiority, Colonel Lynch ordered his command and control ship to conduct a series of low-level firing passes. Although met with heavy ground fire, Colonel Lynch, along with the door gunners, placed heavy fire on the communists inflicting casualties on them. His courageous tactic heartened the infantry troops below, enabling them to mount an assault on the North Vietnamese positions. When the advancing infantry flushed an enemy platoon into the open, he again ordered his pilot to make low-level runs and directed fire which killed twelve of the aggressors. This action was typical of the many valorous deeds performed by Colonel Lynch during twenty-eight consecutive hours I which he directed the American forces in the air and on the ground. During this time, he was responsible for the quick, lifesaving evacuation of wounded personnel, the capture of prisoners and utilization of information obtained from them, and the preparation and execution of battle plans which brought about the complete and decisive defeat of the North Vietnamese. Due to his ability to rapidly assess the changing tactical situation, to react without hesitation and to provide cogent, effective coordination between the ground troops and support elements, the enemy was dealt a fearsome blow. Colonel Lynch's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters: US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 356 (1969)

*LYTTON, BALFOUR OLIVER, JR.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Balfour Oliver Lytton, Jr. (RA13825510), Staff Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Detachment B-20, Company B, 5th Special Forces Group (Airborne), 1st Special Forces. Staff Sergeant Lytton distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 25 March 1968 as Special Forces platoon leader of a Vietnamese strike force company on combat operations. As the company searched for the enemy in dense jungle around its base camp, the lead platoon came under intense automatic weapons fire from a concealed North Vietnamese Army squad. As the small enemy unit withdrew from contact, it was pursued by two platoons of the friendly force. The two elements were drawn into the savage ambush of a North Vietnamese Army company. Sergeant Lytton, commander of the reserve platoon, quickly deployed his troops in a defensive perimeter and directed devastating fire on the attackers to cover the withdrawal of the beleaguered friendly forces. The enemy launched a fierce rocket and small arms barrage on his perimeter, and his men were forced to withdraw under the intensity of the assault. Completely disregarding his personal safety, Sergeant Lytton remained behind and continued his furious fight to cover the withdrawal of the other platoons. He was wounded by the ravaging enemy fire but refused to pull back. After the forward elements escaped the ambush site under his covering fire, he began a maneuver to join them. Enemy troops had isolated his position, blocking his movement and cutting off all avenues of approach for rescue attempts by members of his company. He was mortally wounded while gallantly and unselfishly placing the lives of fellow soldiers above his own safety in the heat of battle. Staff Sergeant Lytton's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 1912 (April 25, 1968)
Home Town: Rockville, Maryland

 

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Citizens Speak Out

BEYOND THE MEDAL

This 5 Disc DVD Education Program has been distributed to over 17,500 Public & Private High Schools and is now available to the public!


 

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