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Full Text Citations For Award of

The Distinguished Service Cross
 U.S. Army Recipients  - Vietnam 

S

To All Who Shall See These Presents Greeting:

This is to Certify that
The President of the United States of America
Takes Pride in Presenting


THE 
DISTINGUISHED SERVICE CROSS
to

 

SABALAUSKI, WALTER JAMES
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Walter James Sabalauski (RA36034325), First Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company C, 2d Battalion, 502d Infantry, 1st Brigade, 101st Airborne Division. First Sergeant Sabalauski distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions during the period 9 to 11 June 1966 while participating in a blocking operation near Dak To. When the Viet Cong occupied jungle suddenly erupted with intense hostile fire from three directions, First Sergeant Sabalauski, realizing that the company commander could not possibly control all the elements in the thick bamboo growth and 50 foot canopies, rallied and directed the beleaguered troops in an attempt to gain fire superiority. With complete disregard for his safety, First Sergeant Sabalauski dashed from position to position and repeatedly exposed himself to muster his unit and quell the hostile fire. As the Viet Cong assaulted the perimeter, First Sergeant Sabalauski quickly organized an assault line and delivered suppressive fire onto the fanatical Viet Cong. After dashing to the rear of the perimeter and observing that the insurgents were surrounding his company, he exposed himself and screamed orders to form a tight defensive perimeter. Although artillery was called in as close as 25 meters from the friendly force and air strikes devastated the jungle around the perimeter, the determined Viet Cong continued to advance. When the company commander called in air strikes on his own position as a last resort, First Sergeant Sabalauski remained on his feet to control the beleaguered paratroopers. For 30 hours, he continued to dash from one side of the perimeter to the other to direct and encourage his men. Although he was wounded himself, First Sergeant Sabalauski aided his wounded comrades, comforted the dying, and continued to direct his men. When reinforcements arrived and a hasty perimeter was again set up, he fearlessly moved forward of the perimeter and retrieved a dead comrade. After a 1,000 meter move to an evacuation point, First Sergeant Sabalauski personally supervised the extraction of the wounded and dead. Through his courage and outstanding leadership throughout the long and perilous battle, he contributed immeasurable to the defeat of the determined Viet Cong. First Sergeant Sabalauski's extraordinary heroism in close combat against a numerically superior hostile force was in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflects great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 5821 (September 27, 1966)
Born: at Lithuania

*SABEL, JOEL MICHAEL
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Joel Michael Sabel (RA19848614), Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 4th Battalion (Airborne), 503d Infantry, 173d Airborne Brigade (Separate). Specialist Four Sabel distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 10 July 1967 while serving as a medic of an Airborne infantry company on a combat mission deep in hostile territory. When his company came under heavy automatic weapons and mortar fire from a well entrenched enemy force, Specialist Sabel repeatedly ignored his own safety to move among his wounded comrades to treat them. Seriously wounded himself, he refused medical aid and instructed others in treating the injured while he bandaged his own wounds. He continued to expose himself to the withering hostile fire while rendering constant aid to others despite his own injuries. With mortar and automatic weapons falling around him, he never stopped to consider his own welfare. He was mortally wounded while bravely caring for the needs of his comrades in the face of grave danger. Specialist Four Sabel's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 4663 (September 14, 1967)
Home Town: West Covina, California

SACKETT, WILLIAM P.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to William P. Sackett (US56722289), Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company B, 5th Battalion, 60th Infantry, 9th Infantry Division. Specialist Four Sackett distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 30 November 1968 while serving as fire team leader on a combat mission in Long An Province. When his platoon became stalemated in a fierce exchange of fire with a hostile force, Specialist Sackett immediately began moving through the embattled area to direct return fire and prevent disorganization among the novice members of the platoon. As he approached one of his positions, an enemy hand grenade landed near four of his comrades. He instantly scooped up the device, turned his back to shield his fellow soldiers, and tossed the grenade back to the enemy. Although the grenade exploded in mid-air wounding him with fragmentation, he, without hesitation, proceeded to assist the only other wounded man through the hostile barrage to an evacuation point. Refusing evacuation himself, he returned to the contact area to assist his platoon in the prolonged battle. Specialist Four Sackett's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 2219 (June 24, 1969)

*SANCHEZ, THOMAS JOSEPH
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Thomas Joseph Sanchez (RA19452350), Master Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Detachment A-108, 5th Special Forces Group (Airborne), 1st Special Forces. Master Sergeant Sanchez distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 6 March 1966 while serving as Special Forces advisor to a Vietnamese reaction unit during the rescue of an ambushed combat patrol near Minh Long. When radio contact with American advisors in the patrol was lost, Sergeant Sanchez unhesitatingly volunteered to fly into the battle torn area to search for the men. He found thirty Vietnamese survivors near the point of conflict and hastily organized them to secure a landing zone for the infiltration of reinforcements. When 28 more troops landed, Sergeant Sanchez deployed the men and moved toward the ambush site. Contemptuous of the threat of another attack, he took the point position and led his men in a rigorous search of the area. The unit was hit by heavy fire after moving less than 500 meters. Sergeant Sanchez hastily led the force out of range of the hostile weapons. He then noticed the absence of an American advisor and two Vietnamese sergeants. Fearlessly ignoring the constant fire around him, he reentered the killing zone alone to find the lost men. Although he was observed being wounded by machine gun fire, he continued to search for the men. Sergeant Sanchez was last seen firing furiously at the Viet Cong, while making a last, gallant effort to reach his comrades. Master Sergeant Sanchez' extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 1731 (April 15, 1967)
Home Town: Pasadena, California

SANDERS, HORACE G.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Horace G. Sanders, First Lieutenant (Artillery), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in action in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Battery C, 7th Battalion, 9th Artillery, 5th Field Artillery Group. First Lieutenant Sanders distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions while serving as executive officer when his battery came under intense mortar, rocket and ground attack on 18 May 1969. As the enemy forces began their assault against the northeast perimeter, Lieutenant Sanders moved to the first howitzer section to supervise the direct fixing of his high-explosive and beehive rounds on the charging force. Although severely wounded when the howitzer section received rocket-propelled grenade fire, he directed those men who could to withdraw to the second howitzer position where they continued to fire on the enemy. After establishing strong retaliatory fire, Lieutenant Sanders then returned on four different occasions to the first howitzer section to retrieve wounded personnel. When a heavy enemy barrage fatally wounded a man near the second howitzer position, Lieutenant Sanders, unaware that the man was fatally wounded, ran into the hostile fusillade to bring him to safety. Throughout the ensuing battle he continued to move from position to position encouraging him men and directing their return fire. On being notified that concentrated hostile fire was coming from a building near the battery, he moved to the fifth howitzer section to direct fire on the building, causing several secondary explosions. First Lieutenant Sanders' extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 105 (January 12, 1970)

SANDERS, JAMES R., JR.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to James R. Sanders, Jr., Captain (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company D, 2d Battalion, 1st Infantry, 196th Infantry Brigade, Americal Division. Captain Sanders distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 19 and 20 March 1969 as company commander during an assault on Hill 187 near Tien Phuoc. As the lead element neared the crest of the hill, the well-entrenched enemy opened up with automatic weapons and grenade fire. Captain Sanders quickly organized an on-line assault to distract the enemy while the wounded were safely evacuated. Realizing that without additional support his men could not penetrate the hostile fortifications, he ordered a withdrawal. He then stormed the hill alone, killed one communist soldier and recovered several weapons left by his casualties. While returning to the rallying point, he sustained a fragmentation wound in his knee. Refusing medical aid he proceeded to call in gun ship air strikes and bombing runs on the enemy bunker complex. On 20 March Captain Sanders and his men quickly routed the enemy and secured the mountain fortress. When the hostile forces launched a counter-mortar attack on his company, Captain Sanders directed suppressive artillery fire on suspected enemy positions and constantly exposed himself to the hail of incoming mortar rounds to aid and evacuate the wounded. Captain Sander's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 2470 (July 9, 1969)

*SANDERSON, JACK JOHNSTONE
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Jack Johnstone Sanderson (RA11644077), Private First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 2d Battalion, 60th Infantry, 9th Infantry Division. Private First Class Sanderson distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 24 November 1968 while serving as a medical aidman during a reconnaissance-in-force mission near Tan Tru. As his platoon approached a dense woodline it came under a sudden barrage of hostile fire. Two of his comrades were wounded and fell in an area completely exposed to the enemy gunners. Private Sanderson courageously moved forward through the fusillade to one of the casualties and, in full view of the communists' emplacement, began to administer first aid. When the man died in spite of his efforts, Private Sanderson, disregarding his safety, charged across the open rice paddy to where the other injured soldier lay. While he was treating this man, an element from his platoon moved to engage the enemy bunker and was fired upon from a previously undetected position, resulting in several more wounded. Once again he braved the hostile fire and went to their aid. As he went from man to man, searching for survivors, he was seriously wounded by enemy rifle fire. Despite sever pain and rapid loss of blood, he managed to drag himself up to the last soldier. Finding that none of the men were alive, he started crawling back to his unit's location, but died from his wounds before he reached safety. Private First Class Sanderson's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 473 (February 11, 1969)
Home Town: Warsaw, New York

*SANTA CRUZ, JOSE ANGEL
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Jose Angel Santa Cruz (527-78-4025), Private First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Troop B, 3d Squadron, 4th Cavalry, 25th Infantry Division. Private First Class Santa Cruz distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 1 February 1970 while serving as a member of an ambush patrol in Tay Ninh Province. Private Santa Cruz and his comrades were attempting to make contact with hostile forces when enemy movement was detected a short distance from the patrol. Private Santa Cruz and his platoon leader immediately advanced toward the enemy troops in an effort to surprise them. Suddenly, Private Santa Cruz observed an enemy trooper toss a grenade toward his platoon leader. Without hesitation, Private Santa Cruz threw his body between his comrade and the grenade, thus shielding him from the ensuing blast. Although Private Santa Cruz was killed instantly, his unselfish action saved the life of his comrade. Private First Class Santa Cruz's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 3188 (July 13, 1970)
Home Town: Glendale, Arizona

*SANZONE, ROBERT BENJAMIN (MIA)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Robert Benjamin Sanzone (US51579676), Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company B, 1st Battalion, 8th Infantry, 1st Brigade, 4th Infantry Division. Sergeant Sanzone distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 18 May 1967 while serving as squad leader with a weapons platoon during a search and destroy mission in Pleiku Province. Sergeant Sanzone's platoon was sent 200 meters forward of his company to provide security for the main force. Before the men had a chance to position themselves, they received intense rifle and machine gun fire. Sergeant Sanzone was hit five or six times immediately, but ignored the pain to direct his squad in placing a base of effective fire on the Viet Cong. Five insurgents tried to attack his position, but he killed them with his rifle. Later, another ten tried to overrun his perimeter sector, and he stopped them with both grenade and rifle fire. When fellow patrol members tried to reach cover in a river bed, Sergeant Sanzone disregarded his own safety and exposed himself to the enemy to draw their fire. He continuously crawled from one friendly casualty to another to treat their wounds and to help them reach covered positions. Although weakened by his wounds, he continued to repel the insurgents. Seeing a swarm of Viet Cong storm the friendly line again, Sergeant Sanzone charged them, firing his rifle on full automatic. He was mortally wounded in this valiant attempt to protect his comrades. Sergeant Sanzone's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 3828 (July 26, 1967)
Home Town: Levittown, New York

*SARACINO, FRANK DEPAUL, JR.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Frank DePaul Saracino, Jr. (RA16918149), Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in action in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Air Cavalry Troop, 11th Armored Cavalry Regiment. Sergeant Saracino distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 20 March 1969 as a squad leader during a mission to assess the damage done by a B-52 bomber strike seven miles northwest of Dau Tieng. Sergeant Saracino was serving as point man when his platoon came upon the bunkers of a base camp occupied by a North Vietnamese Army battalion. Motioning for the other men to take cover, he single-handedly assaulted the first position and destroyed it with a hand grenade. He then led his troops further into the fortified area, shooting and killing two communists whom he spotted trying to escape from a second fortification. The platoon continued to advance, but suddenly became pinned down by machine gun and antitank rocket fire. Exposing himself to the hail of bullets, Sergeant Saracino placed suppressive fire on the enemy which enabled his comrades to withdraw and remained behind until they had all reached a more secure location. After three air strikes were directed against the enemy base camp, he again led his men forward and made another one-man assault against a bunker, killing its two occupants with hand grenades. As he was starting toward another stronghold, a heavy caliber machine gun started to fire on the platoon. Seeing that several of his men were exposed to the deadly fusillade, he attempted to save them by engaging the hostile position and drawing its fire to himself. While attempting to throw a hand grenade at the machine gun emplacement, he was killed by the enemy barrage. Sergeant Saracino's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 1724 (May 14, 1969)
Home Town: Fort Collins, Colorado

*SAUBLE, THOMAS EUGENE
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Thomas Eugene Sauble (0-4005263), Captain (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Advisory Team 1, United States Military Assistance Command, Vietnam. Captain Sauble distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 13 March 1967 while serving as an advisor to the Hieu Nhon Sub-Sector Headquarters when it was attacked by elements of a North Vietnamese battalion. Slightly wounded when he was blown from his bunk by the initial mortar barrage, Captain Sauble dauntlessly moved to his defensive position outside the advisory team quarters. Moving about the bunker directing the defense and calling for ammunition, he repeatedly exposed himself to better engage the enemy. Captain Sauble's accurate return fire and aggressive example inspired his comrades as they prevented the insurgents from overrunning their emplacement on the first attack. Once the bunker became untenable, he fearlessly covered the withdrawal of the other team members into the building, and then assumed an open position on the porch. Contemptuous of the enemy fire striking around him, he fired his carbine into the charging North Vietnamese. When one of the advisors was thrown from the structure by an explosion, Captain Sauble pulled the man to safety and resumed his gallant stand. Even after being fatally wounded, he fell to a sitting position and continued to fight until succumbing to his wounds. His boundless courage and resolute determination were instrumental in breaking the hostile attack and saving the lives of his fellow soldiers. Captain Sauble's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 2001 (May 2, 1967)
Home Town: York, Pennsylvania

*SAULS, ROBERT NED
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Robert Ned Sauls (W-2217750), Chief Warrant Officer (W-2), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Headquarters and Headquarters Battery, 8th Battalion, 26th Artillery, 254th Field Artillery Detachment, I Field Force. Chief Warrant Officer Sauls distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions from 23 February to 10 March 1969 as commander of his radar detachment at Fire Support Base Twelve, near Ben Het, during a siege of the base by North Vietnamese forces equipped with mortars, cannons, automatic weapons and small arms. Exposing himself to the barrage, Mister Sauls located many enemy firing emplacements both visually and by using radar. On six occasions he braved the intense fire to assist in evacuating casualties and frequently directed gun ships against the communists' locations. When the bombardment began on 23 February, he went to the area under heaviest attack where he manned a mortar and machine gun position, and when the need arose drove his jeep through the hail of fire to obtain ammunition. On 27 February and 1 March he received fragment wounds from incoming mortar rounds. Seeing a bunker take a direct hit on 6 March, he repeatedly entered the burning structure to remove casualties, weapons and ammunition. While monitoring the Special Forces' communication network on 10 March, Mister Sauls heard that a friendly element had received heavy casualties. He unhesitatingly drove to the site and found a seriously wounded soldier lying in the road. Braving enemy rounds which were impacting within twenty yards, he helped move the man to the safety of a trench and treated his wounds. He then went to a severely injured Vietnamese officer and was administering first aid when a hostile round struck nearby, fatally wounding him. Chief Warrant Officer Sauls' extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 1556 (May 2, 1969)
Home Town: Atlanta, Georgia

SAVAGE, CLYDE E.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Clyde E. Savage (RA14746198), Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam. Sergeant Savage was serving as squad leader in the 2d Platoon, Company B, 1st Battalion, 7th Cavalry, 1st Cavalry Division (Airmobile), on 14 November 1965, when it was attacked by a hostile force which consisted of approximately two companies. As an offensive measure, Sergeant Savage led his squad and attacked one of the hostile squads. During the attack, the bulk of the hostile force hit them. He immediately pulled his men in tight and succeeded in inflicting numerous casualties on the insurgent force. The rest of the platoon was also under intense fire and had to take a defensive position on a nearby knoll. During the fierce battle that followed, Sergeant Savage saved the lives of three comrades who had been wounded by killing three insurgents who had maneuvered to within ten meters of their position. The platoon leader, platoon sergeant, and weapon's squad leader were mortally wounded, at which time Sergeant Savage assumed command. With most of the men either dead or wounded and being completely surrounded, the platoon continued holding off the insurgents for twenty-six hours. Sergeant Savage courageously called in supporting artillery fire to within fifty meters of their positions during the night. The following morning he shot over thirty of the insurgents during the bitter fight. His leadership during the battle influenced his men to hold out until reinforcements relieved them. Sergeant Savage's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Pacific, General Orders No. 195 (February 1966)

*SCARBOROUGH, EDMUND BAGWEL
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Edmund Bagwel Scarborough (OF-105268), Captain (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in action on 10 May 1968 while serving as Commanding Officer, Company C, 5th Battalion (Mechanized), 60th Infantry, 9th Infantry Division, in Gia Dinh Province, Republic of Vietnam. While in contact with an enemy force of battalion strength, Captain Scarborough's company and another company to his front were halted by a devastating crossfire. Captain Scarborough was ordered to pass through the now-beleaguered lead company and maneuver against the enemy's flank. He immediately organized his mechanized assault and positioned himself in an extremely exposed location from which he could control the advance. Although the enemy force immediately engaged the advancing element with antitank rockets, small arms and automatic weapons fire, Captain Scarborough continued to lead his men, direct the fire of all available weapons and maintain the advance. Realizing the psychological value of Captain Scarborough's exceptional leadership, the enemy began to concentrate all of their firepower at his position. Captain Scarborough continued his utter disregard for his personal safety and remained exposed, directing the consolidation and supporting fires until he was fatally wounded by the concentrated enemy fire. As a direct result of Captain Scarborough's courage the enemy lost 26 KIAs, 3 POWs and 7 weapons were captured. Captain Scarborough's professional competence, grim determination and personal example inspired his men to victory and reflects the utmost credit upon himself and the United States Army.
Department of the Army, General Orders No. 80 (December 16, 1968)
Home Town: Belle Haven, Virginia

SCHER, DONALD M.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Donald M. Scher (0-89593), Captain (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company C, 3d Battalion, 12th Infantry, 1st Brigade, 4th Infantry Division. Captain Scher distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 17 November 1967 as commanding officer of an infantry company during the battle at Dak To. While advancing up hill 1338, his unit was hit by a devastating mortar and automatic weapons barrage from an enemy force occupying well concealed positions. Captain Scher quickly deployed his men in a defensive position and maneuvered through a hail of bullets and shrapnel to direct their fire on the hostile fortifications. Moving to the front of his men, he led them inch by inch up the hill into an intense enemy fusillade. He called for artillery and air strikes when the North Vietnamese firepower prevented further advancement. Completely disregarding his personal safety, he stood up and directed the ordinance on enemy bunkers and trenched. Captain Scher resumed his ground assault as the strikes lifted. Despite the renewed North Vietnamese barrage, he moved back and forth across the hillside, encouraging his men's advance and treating casualties. One wounded soldier was pinned down in the open by relentless fire. Captain Scher crawled to his aid, skillfully administering treatment to the man and carried him to safety. Exposing himself to enemy weapons time after time, he pressed his company's assault, overran the crest of the hill, and routed the hostile forces. Captain Scher's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 2017 (1968)
Home Town: Fort Dix, New Jersey

SCHLOTTMAN, JAMES
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to James Schlottman (0-5419228), First Lieutenant (Artillery), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Troop A, 1st Squadron, 9th Cavalry, 1st Cavalry Division (Airmobile). First Lieutenant Schlottman distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous action on 2 October 1966 while serving as aerial artillery observer during a search and destroy mission near Ngot Bay. As his helicopter surveyed a hostile position, Lieutenant Schlottman spotted an insurgent running from the area, landed, and captured the man. Later, an infantry platoon made contact with insurgents in a nearby village. He directed the pilot to hover at 20 feet over the enemy and, despite a constant hail of hostile machine gun fire, he kept the Viet Cong under grenade and rifle fire for one hour. As a Viet Cong rifleman fired directly at his door gunner, Lieutenant Schlottman stepped into the line of fire and killed the insurgent with a single shot. When his helicopter landed to pick up a seriously wounded medic, Lieutenant Schlottman fearlessly jumped from the helicopter and charged a machine gun position. Using only his pistol, he was able to silence one weapon. Hostile fire so damaged the aircraft as it took off, that the pilot could fly it only 150 meters. Determined to continue the destruction of the enemy, Lieutenant Schlottman ran from the helicopter onto the battlefield with a radio and guided artillery strikes on the Viet Cong positions. First Lieutenant Schlottman's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 2379 (May 25, 1967)

SCHOCH, NICHOLAS W.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Nicholas W. Schoch, Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company B, 3d Battalion, 187th Infantry, 101st Airborne Division (Airmobile). Specialist Four Schoch distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions during the period 10 to 18 May 1969 while serving as a medical aidman during a mission to capture the enemy citadel of Dong Ap Bia Mountain. On 10 May his company engaged an entrenched North Vietnamese force, and Specialist Schoch rushed to the area of fiercest conflict and began to administer medical aid to the wounded. Once, he moved to aid three seriously wounded men lying in an area completely devoid of cover. While treating one of the men, he became the target of a sniper in a nearby tree. Taking the weapon of the man he was treating, he killed the sniper. On 13 May his unit assaulted the enemy stronghold and again came under heavy concentration of hostile fire. As Specialist Schoch was applying first aid to the wounded of the lead element, the medical aidman of another platoon sustained serious wounds and could not breathe. Braving hostile fire, he skillfully performed a tracheotomy on his wounded comrade who resumed breathing and was evacuated. Later as he was treating a casualty, an enemy fragmentation grenade fell near him and the wounded man. He instantly grabbed the grenade and threw it into a nearby bomb crater and then eliminated the enemy soldier who had thrown the device. After completing treatment, he carried the American to a landing zone for evacuation. On the following day, Specialist Schoch treated and evacuated four wounded soldiers who had been well forward in a maneuver toward the summit of the mountain. On 15 May, as the battle for the hill still raged, a helicopter carrying ammunition was downed by hostile fire. Despite the fact that the burning aircraft might explode at any moment, Specialist Schoch ran to the wreckage and retrieved an unconscious survivor and carried him through a barrage of sniper fire to safety where he administered first aid, saving the man's life. For the remainder of the day and until 18 May, he took charge of medical treatment and evacuation on the emergency landing zone. Specialist Four Schoch's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 133 (1970)
Home Town: St. Helena, California

SCHOLTUS, DAVID
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to David Scholtus, Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company B, 3d Battalion, 1st Infantry, Americal Division. Specialist Four Scholtus distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 19 July 1969 when his company and a sister unit became pinned down by heavy fire from a well-entrenched enemy force. Despite the support of gunship and tactical air strikes, the two infantry companies were unable to gain ground or dislodge the enemy from their positions. Directing his squad to place down a heavy base of fire, Specialist Scholtus rushed across thirty meters of open terrain to engage an enemy position. Although subjected to intense volumes of hostile fire, he destroyed the enemy emplacement with rifle fire and hand grenades. He then maneuvered under fire to within twenty feet of a second enemy position. After hurling a grenade to suppress the defenders' fire, he charged the emplacement and silenced its occupants. The stalemate broken by his bold actions, the infantry companies were now free to advance and sweep over the enemy force. Specialist Four Scholtus' extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 3906 (October 18, 1969)

*SCHROEDER, DONALD BENJAMIN
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Donald Benjamin Schroeder (0-70498), Lieutenant Colonel (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 2d Battalion, 39th Infantry, 1st Brigade, 9th Infantry Division. Lieutenant Colonel Schroeder distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 18 August 1968 while elements of his battalion were in heavy contact with a Viet Cong main force battalion near Can Ciuoc. He used his own command and control helicopter, in the midst of heavy enemy fire, to illuminate the landing zone for one element's insertion when a flare ship was forced to leave the battle because of a fuel shortage. After determining that it would be approximately twenty minutes before his men could complete their encirclement of the enemy and that the communists would quickly use a gap between two of his companies as an escape route, Colonel Schroeder ordered his pilot to land. With two other men, he stationed himself in the center of the unguarded area and began firing on the communists, who almost immediately began to probe his position. He successfully prevented their escape for thirty minutes until reinforcements arrived. As the battle progressed the Viet Cong threatened to penetrate another area. Colonel Schroeder unhesitantly moved across two fire-swept rice paddies to the endangered location. With complete disregard for his safety, he began positioning troops to meet the threatened breakout and remained in the front line directing his units' maneuvers until the enemy attempt was repelled. Lieutenant Colonel Schroeder's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 4042 (October 31, 1968)
Home Town: Clearmont, Wyoming

*SCHUBERT, JOEL LUTHER
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Joel Luther Schubert (RA28153264), Private First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company A, 2d Battalion, 27th Infantry, 2d Brigade, 25th Infantry Division. Private First Class Schubert distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 24 October 1967 while serving as senior medical aidman to an infantry company conducting a search and destroy operation deep in enemy territory. As the company was moving through thick jungle underbrush, the lead element was savagely attacked by a well camouflaged Viet Cong squad, and suffered several wounded troops. When he heard their urgent pleas for medical aid, Private Schubert, without hesitation, rushed to treat his stricken comrades. Despite the intensity of the hostile fire, he courageously moved through the bullet swept area to within fifteen meters of a Viet Cong emplacement and administered first aid to a seriously injured soldier. While treating the casualty, Private Schubert was wounded by a burst of enemy automatic weapons fire. Despite his wound, he gallantly began moving from one casualty to the next, applying his skill until he had expended his medical supplies. He then crawled back to the friendly positions, resupplied himself and returned to continue his lifesaving mission amid the hail of enemy bullets. He received a mortal wound as he feverishly treated his fallen comrades. Private First Class Schubert's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 6442 (December 14, 1967)
Home Town: San Francisco, California

*SCHULTZ, ROBERT WILLIAM
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Robert William Schultz (RA17636005), Staff Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 2d Battalion, 47th Infantry, 9th Infantry Division. Staff Sergeant Schultz distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 31 January 1968 as squad leader of a mechanized infantry platoon on a combat mission in the village of Ho Nai. His squad and other members of the platoon became isolated and encircled by a numerically superior force firing recoilless rifles, machine guns, and automatic weapons. The troops on the ground were immediately pinned down by the savage fusillade and Sergeant Schultz' armored personnel carrier was forced to halt. To relive the pressure on his comrades he leaped from the vehicle and assaulted an enemy machine gun nest, single-handedly destroying it and its occupants. Although seriously wounded, he again disregarded his safety and unleashed another personal attack on a second machine gun position. Hurling grenades as he charged through a curtain of hostile fire, Sergeant Schultz killed the entire gun crew. He was mortally wounded while gallantly defending his fellow soldiers in the heat of battle. Staff Sergeant Schultz' extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 1599 (April 9, 1968)
Home Town: Clinton, Iowa

SCHUNGEL, DANIEL F.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Daniel F. Schungel (0-65286), Lieutenant Colonel (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company C, 5th Special Forces (Airborne), 1st Special Forces. Lieutenant Colonel Schungel distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 6 and 7 February 1968 as the commander of the Special Forces camp at Lang Vei. A North Vietnamese Army force launched an armor-supported ground assault on the camp under cover of intense mortar, artillery and rocket fire. When the enemy tanks broke through the defensive wire of the camp, Colonel Schungel, disregarding the heavy volume of incoming artillery rounds, moved outside the command bunker to personally organize and lead a tank killer team in a fierce counterattack on the enemy armor. He moved through the intense and accurate fire from the tanks' coaxial machine guns and personally destroyed one of them with a light anti-tank weapon. When three occupants of the tank emerged from the turret, he engaged them in close combat and killed all three. As the determined enemy began an assault on the command bunker, he directed all personnel in the area to take cover while he remained behind to provide covering fire. He was wounded by the blast from an exploding round which hit the barrier he was using for a shield. He then sought safety for himself, carrying a wounded comrade with him. When air strikes had momentarily silenced the enemy guns, he led his men from the bunker where they had taken cover to a safe area. Lieutenant Colonel Schungel's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 4107 (August 26, 1968)

SCHWEITZER, ROBERT L.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Robert L. Schweitzer (0-77192), Lieutenant Colonel (Armor), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 1st Infantry Division. Lieutenant Colonel Schweitzer distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 11 December 1966 while serving as aerial observer during the defense of the village of Tam Da. Colonel Schweitzer received word that a Viet Cong battalion was approaching the small village and hastened to intercept the enemy. Ignoring intense fire aimed at his aircraft, he had its pilot fly low over the insurgents to accurately determine their size and deployment. Then, as his pilot landed inside the hamlet, he radioed for infantry troops and artillery and air fire support. Colonel Schweitzer alerted the hamlet's troops and gathered civilians into bunkers just before the Viet Cong struck with devastating force. When friendly artillery rounds began coming in, he left the village to guide the strikes from the air. Two insurgents were noticed, at this time, running from a concealed tunnel entrance. Colonel Schweitzer killed both of them with a rapid burst of fire, then landed to investigate the tunnel. Fearlessly probing the underground passages alone, he discovered and disarmed four booby traps before coming upon three insurgents in a hollowed out chamber. In the brief fight, he killed two of them and captured one. After mining the tunnels for destruction, he re-boarded his helicopter with the prisoner and intelligence materials. Colonel Schweitzer the continued surveillance of the Viet Cong forces, repeatedly exposing himself to hostile fire to discover hostile maneuvers. Through his brilliant direction, the American forces and firepower were able to decisively rout the large Viet Cong unit and save the village of Tam Da. Lieutenant Colonel Schweitzer's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 2059 (May 5, 1967)

*SCHWELLENBACH, GARY RALPH
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Gary Ralph Schwellenbach (RA18907134), Private First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in action in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving as a platoon aidman with Company A, 3d Battalion (Airborne), 503d Infantry, 173d Airborne Brigade. On 27 December 1967, during a heliborne assault into an enemy held landing zone, Corporal Schwellenbach's unit was taken under heavy enemy automatic weapons and sniper fire. Although seriously wounded shortly after arriving on the landing zone, Corporal Schwellenbach continued to aid the wounded. With complete disregard for his own safety, he moved among the wounded in the open area of the landing zone which was receiving the most intense enemy fire. Moving his comrades t cover he was wounded a second time. Refusing medical aid for himself, he continued his mission. He received a third and fatal wound while administering aid to a wounded man. The actions of Corporal Schwellenbach saved the lives of many wounded troopers and his indomitable spirit encourage all who witnessed his acts. Corporal Schwellenbach's conspicuous gallantry, extraordinary heroism and intrepidity, at the cost of his life, are in the highest traditions of the United States Army and reflect the utmost credit upon himself and the armed forces of his country.
Department of the Army, General Orders No. 57 (October 17, 1968)
Home Town: Chico, California

*SCIBILIA, ROBERT PETER
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Robert Peter Scibilia (001-38-1766), Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company B, 3d Battalion, 60th Infantry, 9th Infantry Division. Specialist Four Scibilia distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 23 May 1969 while serving as a rifleman during a reconnaissance-in-force operation near My Tho in Kien Hoa Province. After the company had been inserted into the area, the enemy unleashed a barrage so intense that the unit was forced to withdraw and regroup. Armed with several M-72 light anti-tank weapons, grenades, and his rifle, Specialist Scibilia crawled toward the entrenched enemy and then stood to accurately fire his M-72 and silence the position. He then directed his fire against another fortification, eliminating the position and advancing against yet another which he destroyed with two hand grenades. Although wounded during this last action, he continued to press his attack until he was mortally wounded. Specialist Four Scibilia's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 3292 (August 26, 1969)
Home Town: Nashua, New Hampshire

SCOTT, JAMES A., III
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to James A. Scott, III (0-93930), Captain (Artillery), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with 92d Assault Helicopter Company, 10th Combat Aviation Battalion, 17th Combat Aviation Group, 1st Aviation Brigade. Captain Scott distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 3 February 1968 as the team leader of an aerial fire team supporting ground operations in Dalat. The ground forces encountered heavy enemy fire which halted their advance, and Captain Scott made repeated low-level passes over the battle area to pinpoint the insurgents' positions. His aircraft was riddled by the fire directed at it, but he succeeded in locating targets for his team and led it in an attack on the enemy emplacements. He then flew to a nearby airfield to rearm and refuel his craft. The field was under mortar attack, and Captain Scott had to replenish his ship amid a hail of shrapnel. As he once more orbited the city looking for trouble spots, his helicopter received enemy anti-aircraft fire and he was wounded. Captain Scott found the source of the fire and again led his team in the attack. As his aircraft broke away from the target, it was struck again by the murderous enemy fusillade and the tail rotor control cables were severed. Despite the tremendous handicap, Captain Scott ski fully maneuvered his crippled ship into position for yet another attack on the enemy position. When he was unable to maintain positive control over his helicopter, he nursed it to the airfield once more and executed a successful emergency landing. Captain Scott's' extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service reflecting great credit on him and the U.S. Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 3477 (July 19, 1968)

SCOTT, JON E.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Jon E. Scott, Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company B, 1st Battalion, 12th Infantry, 4th Infantry Division. Sergeant Scott distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 5 November 1969 while serving as squad leader with a reconnaissance patrol during an operation southwest of Landing Zone Tape. Hearing enemy movement in the distance, the patrol proceeded to the area from which the sounds came and there discovered as enemy base camp situated in four natural caves. As the surprised enemy scurried for their cave fortifications, the patrol took them under fire and succeeded in capturing one of the enemy. From the caves the enemy responded with heavy automatic weapons fire. Seeing one enemy soldier run into a cave alone, Sergeant Scott approached the cave, entered, and captured the surprised enemy. Sergeant Scott then turned his attention to the other caves. Under continuous and intense fire, he maneuvered to the openings of the caves one by one and hurled hand grenades inside. At the mouth of the largest cave, from which the heaviest enemy fire was coming, Sergeant Scott tossed grenades within and killed one enemy soldier. He then rushed inside the cave to engage the remaining defenders and was severely wounded in a barrage of automatic weapons fire. Sergeant Scott's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 875 (April 15, 1970)
Home Town: Glenhaven, California

*SEE, OTTO WILLIAM
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Otto William See (RA13704655), Sergeant First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Troop A, 1st Squadron, 9th Cavalry, 1st Cavalry Division. Sergeant First Class See distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 11 March 1968 while serving as the observer on the lead ship of an aero-scout team reconnoitering an area in Quang Tri Province suspected to contain an enemy regimental headquarters. After locating the communists' barracks, the team called in armed helicopters which fired rockets into the buildings. As the scout ships returned to the area to assess the damage, they and the troop commander's helicopter came under intense automatic weapons fire. The troop commander and his pilot were wounded, and their craft crashed. Sergeant See immediately volunteered to attempt a rescue. Because his helicopter was unable to land near the crash site, he jumped from its skid as it hovered over the wreckage. The downed craft had begun to burn, and its still running engine was spewing fuel on the spreading flames. Sergeant See climbed inside the ship and pulled the wounded out one at a time. As he started to carry the casualties up a ravine for extraction by a waiting aircraft, a North Vietnamese company began to advance on his position to cut off his maneuver. Armed only with a pistol, he returned their fire while continuing to assist the injured up the hill. Upon reaching the landing zone, he put the casualties safely aboard the ship and remained behind with some of its crew members, fighting off the aggressors until another rescue helicopter arrived. Platoon Sergeant See's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 5200 (November 8, 1968)
Home Town: Summersville, West Virginia

*SEIBERT, RICHARD J.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Richard J. Seibert (0-5338151), Second Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company D, 3d Battalion, 21st Infantry, 196th Infantry Brigade (Light) (Separate). Second Lieutenant Seibert distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 8 January 1968 while serving as platoon leader of an infantry unit during a search and clear operation in the Que Son Valley. Shortly after noon, his platoon was heavily attacked by an enemy force firing from a treeline. With bullets striking all around him, Lieutenant Seibert unhesitantly led a fierce attack on the hostile positions. His men became pinned down by a withering hail of bullets, and he crawled forward alone and destroyed one position with well-placed grenades. Intense machine gun fire raked his position from the flank, and he fearlessly directed his assault on the second Viet Cong emplacement. After crossing a river, he charged the fortification across an open rice paddy. He quickly reached a low dike and hurled two grenades into the machine gun nest which demolished the weapon and killed its crew. He repeatedly exposed himself to enemy weapons to draw fire away from his men and allow them to join the attack. When it became evident that his unit was surrounded, Lieutenant Seibert rallied his men to fight their way through the insurgents' lines. With complete disregard for his personal safety, he led a furious charge into a curtain of enemy fire to break through the encirclement. He was mortally wounded while gallantly leading his men against heavy odds in the heat of battle. Second Lieutenant Seibert's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 871 (February 26, 1968)
Home Town: Far Hills, New Jersey

SELLERS, RICHARD D.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Richard D. Sellers, Warrant Officer (W-1), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Troop E, 1st Squadron, 9th Cavalry, 1st Cavalry Division (Airmobile). Warrant Officer W1 Sellers distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 5 January 1971 while piloting a helicopter during rescue operations near Lai Khe. Learning that an American helicopter had been shot down and its survivors were in close proximity of enemy troops, Warrant Officer Sellers volunteered to attempt a rescue and flew to the site of the wreckage. As he approached the location of the downed aircraft, his helicopter became the target of intense enemy ground fire. Unable to land, Mister Sellers had to hover his rescue airship while one of the wounded soldiers was lifted aboard. Suddenly, a barrage of automatic weapons fire sprayed upon his helicopter, necessitating an evasive departure in order for a helicopter gunship to saturate the area with suppressive fire. Although his helicopter sustained battle damage, the defiant Mister Sellers again brought his helicopter to a hover over the remaining crew members. Amid a fusillade of enemy bullets, Warrant Officer Sellers remained in this vulnerable position until all were on board and then proceeded to Phuoc Vinh's medical hospital. Warrant Officer W1 Sellers' extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 1325 (April 20, 1971)

SERGENT, ORVILLE W., III
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Orville W. Sergent, III, Specialist Fifth Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with 366th Aviation Detachment (Divisional), 165th Aviation Group, 1st Aviation Brigade. Specialist Five Sergent distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 11 May 1969 during an enemy attack on Fire Base Oasis. Specialist Sergent moved through the barrage of incoming mortar rounds to take up a position on the perimeter. When the bombardment ceased and a force of about one hundred sappers armed with satchel charges and grenades stormed the berm, Specialist Sergent delivered a fusillade of rifle fire on the assailants. Despite the heavy retaliatory fire, the enemy penetrated the defense line. Specialist Sergent immediately left his bunker and directly engaged the enemy in hand-to-hand combat. Seeming to be everywhere at once, he shot a sniper who had wounded one of his comrades. He eliminated two more enemy sappers while fighting his way toward two wounded men, whom he succeeded in removing to safety. When a hostile sniper killed the detachment sergeant who was attempting to secure munitions from a conex container, Specialist Sergent quickly shot the sniper and then carried the needed ammunition to several firing points. For two hours he continued to engage the enemy, always remaining in the open, and he proved most instrumental in repelling the hostile force and in preventing another penetration. Specialist Five Sergent's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 3310 (August 29, 1969)

SEVERSON, DANIEL J.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Daniel J. Severson (OF-103149), First Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company B, 4th Battalion (Airborne), 503d Infantry, 173d Airborne Brigade (Separate). First Lieutenant Severson distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 16 January 1967 while serving with elements of the 503rd Infantry on a search and destroy operation near Ben Cat. As company Executive Officer, Lieutenant Severson was accompanying the point platoon when it made contact and assaulted a hostile bunker complex. During the intense fire-fight that ensued, several friendly casualties were sustained, including the platoon leader. Lieutenant Severson immediately assumed command and, exposed to the devastating fire, moved along the line shouting encouragement, distributing ammunition and directing fire into the insurgent emplacements. Inspired and calmed by his gallant leadership, the platoon quickly regrouped and killed four Viet Cong before being ordered to withdraw. As the unit stated to pull back, it suddenly received murderous fire from a hidden gun on the right flank. Lieutenant Severson dauntlessly advanced toward the Viet Cong position, until he was knocked unconscious by an exploding grenade, which killed his radio operator and disabled his weapon. Regaining consciousness, and armed only with grenades, he single-handedly assaulted the hostile emplacement, but was painfully wounded in the leg. With complete disregard for his safety, he continued to crawl forward and silenced the weapon, killing one insurgent. Refusing medical treatment, Lieutenant Severson covered the platoon withdrawal and returned to the company perimeter only after ensuring that none of his dead or wounded were left behind. Demonstrating boundless courage and aggressive determination, he further assisted the commander in directing air strikes which routed the hostile force. First Lieutenant Severson extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 1064 (March 12, 1967)

*SEVERSON, PAUL ROY
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Paul Roy Severson (RA16830445), Specialist Fifth Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Detachment B-20, Company B, 5th Special Forces (Airborne), 1st Special Forces. Specialist Five Severson distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 25 August 1968 while serving as a platoon leader during an assault on enemy-controlled bunkers and trenches in the Duc Lap Special Forces camp. Specialist Severson, pinned down initially by a heavy volume of small arms and automatic weapons fire, joined another American and began a two-man assault on an estimated two platoons of North Vietnamese Army troops. Braving a withering hail of hostile fire, they seized the first bunker. They then rushed another bunker, and when grenades failed to silence its weapons, Specialist Severson moved around the fortification and killed the enemy inside with rifle fire. He then entered the communist-held trench line. Moving forward alone under heavy fire, he encountered four aggressors and killed two of them before he was mortally wounded. Specialist Five Severson's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 4562 (October 1, 1968)
Home Town: Glenwood, Illinois

*SHAFFER, EARL THOMAS, SR.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Earl Thomas Shaffer, Sr. (RA34761131), First Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company A, 5th Battalion, 7th Cavalry, 3d Brigade, 1st Cavalry Division (Airmobile). First Sergeant Shaffer distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 9 December 1968 during a search and clear mission in a rubber plantation in Binh Long Province. His company's mortar platoon was attacked by an estimated two companies of North Vietnamese regulars. The three other platoons attempted to reach the besieged element, but were halted by intense fire from several enemy machine guns, forcing them to deploy into a defensive perimeter. Despite the repeated assaults of the numerically superior foe, Sergeant Shaffer insisted on continuing to the stranded platoon. Moving beyond his company's perimeter, he crawled past several hostile machine gun positions to the surrounded unit's location where he found six men wounded and in need of medical attention. He treated the men while remaining exposed to intense enemy fire. Spotting the platoon leader lying seriously wounded, he unhesitatingly went to his assistance, although warned the man's position was covered by an enemy machine gun. He was able to reach him, but was fatally wounded as he began to render medical aid. First Sergeant Shaffer's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 405 (February 5, 1969)
Home Town: Covington, Georgia

SHARPE, MERLE J.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Merle J. Sharpe (0-5239461), First Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company A, 5th Battalion, 60th Infantry, 9th Infantry Division. First Lieutenant Sharpe distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 7 May 1968 as the commanding officer of a mechanized infantry company during an operation in Gia Dinh Province. During his first few moments of contact with a reinforced Viet Cong battalion located in a built-up residential area, Lieutenant Sharpe was severely wounded and his command vehicle destroyed by enemy rocket fire. Refusing evacuation, he moved to another track, propped himself up in a highly vulnerable position and continued to direct his company's maneuver, supporting artillery, gunships and air strikes. When the air strikes were completed Lieutenant Sharpe personally led his unit in a house-to-house assault on the Viet Cong. Despite the pain of his wounds, he refused medical evacuation for six hours, until the enemy had been routed from the area. As a result of his courageous leadership, the enemy lost two hundred and thirteen dead by body count. First Lieutenant Sharpe's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 4524 (September 28, 1968)

*SHAUGHNESSY, EDWARD JEROME
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Edward Jerome Shaughnessy (122-34-1507), Private First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company A, 1st Battalion, 52d Infantry, 198th Infantry Brigade, Americal Division. Private First Class Shaughnessy distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 12 May 1969 while defending Landing Zone Stinson. A numerically superior enemy force breached the landing zone's defensive perimeter and quickly captured several bunkers under cover of intense rocket and mortar barrages. On perimeter guard at the time of attack, Private Shaughnessy left his bunker and rushed through the storm of incoming projectiles to take up a position close to where the sappers were concentrating their assault. He slowed the sappers' infiltration with heavy volumes of strafing machine gun fire. When the gun malfunctioned, he again ran under fire to another friendly emplacement to obtain hand grenades. He then charged one occupied bunker and eliminated its captors with well-placed grenades. Seeing a team of sappers cutting their way through the perimeter wire, he repelled the intruders by unleashing on them the remainder of his grenades. Private Shaughnessy then secured two M-72 Light Anti-tank Weapons, maneuvered close to the last enemy-held fortifications, and destroyed them. Private First Class Shaughnessy's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 3786 (October 7, 1969)
Home Town: Hawthorne, California

*SHAW, CLARENCE LEE
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Clarence Lee Shaw (RA67136332), Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company D, 1st Battalion, 26th Infantry, 1st Infantry Division. Specialist Four Shaw distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 7 November 1967 while serving as acting sergeant of an infantry unit on a two-company search and destroy operation near Loc Ninh. Specialist Shaw and his squad were providing flank security for his company when forward elements located and killed an enemy sniper. A large Viet Cong force immediately triggered a savage attack on the entire unit with claymore mines, automatic weapons and small arms fire. After quickly deploying his squad in an extremely effective defensive perimeter, he repeatedly exposed himself to the intense barrage to locate the targets and direct fire on the enemy positions which inflicted heavy casualties on the determined insurgents. He was seriously wounded when the Viet Cong began hitting his position with accurate rocket fire, and his squad was ordered to join the main body of the company. Completely disregarding his own safety, Specialist Shaw directed his men to move back while he remained behind to cover their movement. The Viet Cong intensified their attack on his position, but instead of seeking shelter, Specialist Shaw braved the withering fire and charged the advancing enemy, inflicting heavy casualties on the attackers with rifle fire and grenades. He was mortally wounded while unselfishly placing the lives of his fellow soldiers above his own welfare in the face of grave danger. His gallant actions completely disorganized the insurgents and enabled his company to totally defeat them in a fierce battle. Specialist Four Shaw's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 6501 (December 18, 1967)
Home Town: Ardmore, Oklahoma

*SHAW, GARY FRANCIS
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Gary Francis Shaw (RA11703347), Private First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company C, 1st Battalion (Airborne), 503d Infantry, 173d Airborne Brigade (Separate). Private First Class Shaw distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 11 November 1967 as radio operator of an airborne infantry company conducting a search and destroy mission near Dak To. The unit was moving down a ridgeline covered with thick bamboo when it was savagely attacked by a North Vietnamese battalion firing mortars, rockets and automatic weapons. Heavy casualties were suffered by the lead platoon, and Private Shaw immediately volunteered to go to the aid of his wounded comrades. Braving withering enemy fire, he raced from one clump of bamboo to another as he advanced seventy-five meters down the hill to where the stricken paratroopers lay. With bullets striking all around him, he began to pull the wounded from the killing zone and carry them up the hill to safety. He saw one casualty fall in an exposed area while attempting to crawl from the ambush site unassisted. Ignoring exploding mortars and grenades, Private Shaw moved to the man and dragged him to the company's defensive perimeter. He then returned to the base of the ridge and killed at least six of the assaulting North Vietnamese with fierce rifle fire as other members of his unit rescued the remaining wounded. He was instantly killed while gallantly covering their withdrawal. Private First Class Shaw's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 1487 (April 2, 1968)
Born: March 13, 1948 at Windsor, Nova Scotia, Canada
Home Town: Toledo, Ohio

*SHAW, WILLIAM FREDERICK, JR.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to William Frederick Shaw, Jr. (250-86-7102), Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company D, 5th Battalion, 60th Infantry, 3d Brigade, 9th Infantry Division. Sergeant Shaw distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 6 August 1970 while serving as a machine gunner during allied reconnaissance operations in Binh Duong Province. As darkness approached on 6 August 1970, Sergeant Shaw manned his machine gun position at the edge of a bomb crater while the remainder of the company prepared their positions nearby. Suddenly a friendly observation post, located approximately twenty meters from the sergeant, was raked by a volley of enemy fire, wounding one of the observers. Because of the proximity of his position to the besieged allies, Sergeant Shaw could not provide effective counter fire without endangering them. Realizing immediate action was essential, the sergeant secured his machine gun and assaulted the enemy forces, firing his weapon as he advanced. Although wounded by the enemy fire that was now directed almost entirely at him, he never faltered in his advance and continued firing at the enemy until he was fatally wounded soon thereafter. Because of his determined actions, the remainder of the company was able to successfully react to the enemy force and insure the relative safety of the allied observers. Sergeant Shaw's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 5110 (November 20, 1970)
Home Town: Columbia, South Carolina

SHEA, THOMAS
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Thomas Shea, Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company A, 3d Battalion, 4th Infantry Division. Specialist Four Shea distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 9 May 1969 while serving as a member in the defense of Landing Zone Penny. During the early morning hours enemy mortars and rockets began raining on the base. A force of North Vietnamese quickly penetrated the barbed wire barrier and swarmed into the camp flinging satchel charges. Taking control of a machine gun bunker, the hostile force began firing the fifty-caliber weapon at mortar and artillery positions within the perimeter. Specialist Shea quickly crawled toward the enemy position and silenced it with hand grenades. Then, after securing an M-16 rifle, he made his way toward the tactical operations center which was the target for the main invading force. As he approached, the communists unleashed a torrent of small arms fire. Specialist Shea was knocked to the ground when a round struck him in the leg. He crawled to a machine gun position where he secured the weapon and walked directly toward the enemy with the machine gun blazing. His aggressive assault forced the hostile soldiers back, enabling a reaction force to sweep in and secure the perimeter. Specialist Four Shea's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 3423 (September 7, 1969)

*SHERRILL, JAMES J.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to James J. Sherrill (RA14583660), Sergeant First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Advisory Team 64, U.S. Army Advisory Group, United States Military Assistance Command, Vietnam. Sergeant First Class Sherrill distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 31 January 1968 while serving as advisor to a Vietnamese Regional Force unit on a combat mission near Chau Doc. When Viet Cong elements invaded the city as part of their Lunar New Year offensive, Sergeant Sherrill immediately led four platoons in an attempt to drive the enemy out. The road to the town was blocked by a hostile force firing small arms, machine guns and grenades. Sergeant Sherrill quickly deployed his men for an assault through the Viet Cong lines. He then mounted his jeep and manned the machine gun in support of their advance on the enemy. A fellow soldier maneuvered to knock out an enemy machine gun with a recoilless rifle, but was pinned down by ravaging fire from the position. Sergeant Sherrill fully exposed himself to the insurgents' weapons and delivered devastating fire on the hostile emplacement to allow the man to move forward and destroy it. His troops' furious attack forced the Viet Cong to slowly pull back, and he tenaciously maintained pressure on the determined enemy. As he drove forward in the jeep, it was raked by automatic weapons and grenade fire. Severely wounded, he took cover behind the vehicle and returned fire with his rifle. Completely disregarding his welfare, he fought on until his ammunition was expended. Defenseless, he fearlessly remained in his tenuous position until he succumbed to his wounds. His courageous leadership inspired his men to continue their assault, and to defeat the enemy forces. Sergeant First Class Sherrill's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 1174 (March 18, 1968)
Home Town: Dover, Tennessee

SHORTMAN, PHILLIP V.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Phillip V. Shortman, Private First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company A, 2d Battalion, 27th Infantry, 25th Infantry Division. Private First Class Shortman distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 12 August 1969 while serving as a rifleman during a mission to establish a forward patrol base near Hieu Thien. After his unit had been airlifted into the landing zone and had begun to move away, an enemy force opened fire from the cover of a hedgerow, pinning the company down. Observing how the hostile fire was decimating his platoon, Private Shortman crawled forward through the fusillade to within fifteen meters of the enemy and tossed a grenade into a spiderhole bunker. As he moved back to his element's position, he carried two wounded comrades from their exposed location and immediately rendered first aid. As the deadly hail of hostile fire continued to riddle the area, Private Shortman again crawled forward in the face of the enemy to recover an M-60 machine gun left by a casualty. After a second perilous trip to secure ammunition, he commenced to unleash a devastating barrage which enabled the casualties to be evacuated and caused the enemy to flee. Private First Class Shortman's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 4036 (October 31, 1969)

*SIDERS, MARVIN ISAAC
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Marvin Isaac Siders (OF-110427), Captain (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company D, 2d Battalion, 7th Cavalry, 3d Brigade, 1st Cavalry Division. Captain Siders distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 6 November 1968 while leading his company on a search and clear operation. The unit made contact with a large, well-entrenched North Vietnamese Army force and during the initial volley was pinned down by the intense hostile fire and sustained heavy casualties. Captain Siders moved through the aggressors' barrage to effectively position his troops and organize the evacuation of the wounded. After guiding in the ambulance helicopter and insuring that the injured men were safely evacuated, he ran to the foremost fighting position and directed both aerial rocket artillery and air strikes to within one hundred meters of his location. As he moved forward during a brief lull in the fighting to assess the damage of the tactical air strikes, the enemy suddenly unleashed a heavy bombardment of rocket, semi-automatic and automatic weapons fire. From his advanced position, Captain Siders spotted a strategic bunker which was directing the greatest volume of fire on his element. He immediately maneuvered toward the emplacement in a courageous attempt to draw the hostile fire. Skillfully employing his weapon and hurling grenades as he charged, Captain Siders was within feet of the fortification before being mortally wounded. Captain Siders' extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 387 (February 4, 1969)
Home Town: Macy, Indiana

SILVERSTEIN, WILLIAM I.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to William I. Silverstein (W-3152753), Chief Warrant Officer (W-2), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with 170th Assault Helicopter Company, 52d Aviation Battalion, 17th Aviation Group, 1st Aviation Brigade. Chief Warrant Officer Silverstein distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 21 and 22 March 1967 while piloting a helicopter during a battle in Kontum Province. As the action opened Miser Silverstein volunteered to fly through intense hostile machine gun fire and the trajectory of enemy mortars and friendly artillery to the battle area to deliver the S-3 to the battalion command group. When one company reported that all its leaders had been either killed or wounded, he again volunteered to insert necessary personnel although the unit was in heavy contact and the only possible landing zone was in thick jungle behind North Vietnamese Army positions. After successfully landing seven men, he flew to a fire base, returned with ammunition and other vital supplies and, while under heavy enemy fire, lowered them through the dense foliage to the desperate ground troops. As night fell, an ambulance helicopter was shot down as it attempted to extract a wounded man and Miser Silverstein promptly inserted medical aidmen to care for the soldier. Learning that a raging brush fire had isolated the medics from other friendly elements, he returned through darkness and the communists' fusillade to evacuate them. Despite choking smoke and leaping flames he twice hovered over a bomb crater until all the medics were extracted. As the night progressed, he remained aloft to act as an aerial radio relay for the ground units, despite the fact that his ship was constantly revealed to hostile gunners by flares and illumination rounds. Responding to a call from a unit with fifteen wounded, he was driven away on his initial approach by the tremendous concentration of enemy fire, yet he returned to insert the battalion surgeon and evacuate two of the injured soldiers. He then shuttled back and forth through towering trees, darkness, and the North Vietnamese barrage to guide other ships into the landing zone. As the casualties were being evacuated, he spotted a hostile mortar position which was shelling the Americans and directed a gunship attack which destroyed it. Chief Warrant Officer Silverstein's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 119 (January 11, 1969)

*SIMMONS, BURNELL
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Burnell Simmons (RA14350143), Staff Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Battery A, 2d Battalion, 320th Artillery, 1st Brigade, 101st Airborne Division. Staff Sergeant Simmons distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 15 October 1967 while serving as chief of a howitzer section supporting ground operations near Tam Ky. Late at night, a large Viet Cong force savagely attacked his camp with mortars, rockets, and small arms. The speed and intensity of the enemy assault overran the outposts, but Sergeant Simmons dashed to the battery under heaviest attack and rallied his men to fight furiously against the determined onslaught. He was seriously wounded by exploding grenades when the insurgents reached the parapets of his gun emplacement, but he refused aid and prepared the gun for direct fire against the onrushing enemy. Completely ignoring his own safety, he stood up amidst the fierce barrage to locate the hostile troop concentrations and fire rounds which momentarily stunned the insurgents and drove them back. Despite the continued fire, he dashed into the open to treat the wounded men and carry them to safety. He moved through the intense barrage time after time to direct fire on the determined insurgents and continue treating the casualties. He was mortally wounded while gallantly leading his men in the face of grave danger. His fearless leadership inspired his men to fight fiercely and repel the overwhelming Viet Cong attack. Staff Sergeant Simmons' extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 6014 (November 21, 1967)
Home Town: Leary, Georgia

SIMONS, ARTHUR D.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Arthur D. Simons, Colonel (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism while commanding the ground element of a joint United States task force on an operation deep in North Vietnam on 21 November 1970. With complete disregard for his own personal safety, Colonel Simons voluntarily participated as a member of a Joint Task Force with the humanitarian mission of rescuing United States military personnel held as prisoners of war at the Son Tay Prison Compound approximately twenty nautical miles from Hanoi, the capital of North Vietnam. In an outstanding display of leadership and personal courage, Colonel Simons led the ground force in the rescue effort. On the ground, the search and rescue element was immediately taken under automatic weapons fire by the enemy. While directing and supervising the operation, Colonel Simons continually exposed himself to enemy fire and, on one occasion, personally took under fire enemy personnel in close proximity to his position. The success of the operation was the direct result of Colonel Simons' calm and competent leadership in an extremely hazardous situation. His professional conduct instilled confidence in his men and resulted in an outstanding operation. Colonel Simons' extraordinary heroism was in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Army and reflects great credit on him and the United States Army.
Department of the Army, General Orders No. 32 (July 13, 1971)

SIMONS, JAMES P.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to James P. Simons (0-5532898), First Lieutenant (Armor), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Troop A, 1st Squadron, 9th Cavalry, 1st Cavalry Division (airmobile). First Lieutenant Simons distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 17 December 1966 while serving as team leader of a helicopter scout group during a ground search and destroy mission near Bong Son. When initial ground contact with Viet Cong was made, Lieutenant Simons began flying at tree-top level on the outskirts of the battle area to prevent enemy escape. He began to receive machine gun fire and maneuvered so that the observer with him could fire on the insurgents, killing two of the enemy in this manner. He then began to reconnoiter the battle area for landing zones in preparation for infiltration of a rifle platoon. He received intense machine gun fire from two small clearings but returned the fire and mortally wounded a Viet Cong gunner. Finding a zone free of enemy control, he led the helicopters through a successful infiltration. After rearming and refueling his aircraft, Lieutenant Simons returned and found the friendly force in close combat with the insurgents. Despite intense ground fire, he flew at tree-top level to mark hostile positions with smoke grenades for supporting armed aircraft. When it became evident that the ground troops were still unable to maneuver because of the heavily fortified Viet Cong emplacement, Lieutenant Simons hovered his helicopter over the hostile bunkers and dropped grenades on them. Seeing friendly casualties stranded near the insurgent emplacements, he hovered in front of the enemy positions, attracting the insurgents' fire while the casualties were carried to safety. His aircraft was damaged by several enemy rounds, but he skillfully landed it outside the area of contact. First Lieutenant Simons' extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 4455 (September 1, 1967)

*SIMPSON, MICHAEL PAUL
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Michael Paul Simpson (US54817844), Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company D, 2d Battalion, 14th Infantry, 25th Infantry Division. Sergeant Simpson distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 20 September 1968 during a reconnaissance-in-force operation near Cu Chi. His unit received intense fire from an enemy force concealed in well fortified bunkers. Sergeant Simpson moved through the bullet-swept area, positioning his men and calling in artillery fire upon the hostile positions. Disregarding his safety, he assaulted an enemy bunker. Although wounded as he began his attack, Sergeant Simpson continued through the communists' fusillade and completely destroyed the fortification. As he attempted to recover the body of a fallen comrade near another hostile emplacement, he was killed by enemy fire. Sergeant Simpson's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 5469 (November 27, 1968)
Home Town: Mattoon, Illinois

SINCERE, CLYDE J., JR.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Clyde J. Sincere, Jr., Captain (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company B, 5th Special Forces Group (Airborne), 1st Special Forces. Captain Sincere distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions during the period 8 through 11 November 1966, while serving as Special Forces Senior Advisor to a Vietnamese Company engaged in search and destroy operations near Plei Trap. On 8 November, Captain Sincere personally led his forward element in an attack on two antiaircraft guns. His men killed four insurgents, and captured their weapons and 35 packs of information concerning future enemy operations. On the night of 10 November, while Captain Sincere was separated from his company, it received an attack from a large Viet Cong force. When the acting commander was seriously wounded, and the unit's ammunition was nearly exhausted, Captain Sincere flew into the ravaged landing zone to bring supplies and to lead the force out of the enemy circle. He jumped from the helicopter before it touched down and fearlessly ran, through a tremendous outburst of fire, toward the nearest cover. Insurgents hidden at this position wounded him, but he was able to evade further fire and reached his own lines. Captain Sincere took command of the defenses, and again entered the bullet-swept field with a small group to retrieve the critical supplies. Upon returning to his own lines, he distributed the ammunition, called in air and artillery strikes, and enabled the company to break contact with the Viet Cong the next day. His fearless actions under intense hostile fire gave his men the leadership and inspiration to work as an effective fighting force. Captain Sincere's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 1219 (March 20, 1967)
Born: September 11, 1932 at Coleman, Wisconsin
Home Town: Milwaukee, Wisconsin


*SIZEMORE, CLARENCE
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Clarence Sizemore (402-58-3806), Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company A, 1st Battalion, 20th Infantry, 11th Infantry Brigade, Americal Division. Sergeant Sizemore distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 21 May 1969 while in charge of a bridge security force near Landing Zone Liz at Duc Pho in Quang Ngai Province. In the early morning hours his position was attacked by a North Vietnamese platoon of sappers utilizing machine guns, small arms, and rocket-propelled grenades. Seeing that the communists had penetrated the defenses near the north end of the bridge, he raced over there, releasing bursts from his automatic weapon at the aggressors as he ran. After he had killed one enemy soldier and repelled the assault, he returned to the opposite end of the bridge to re-supply his ammunition, only to discover that a hostile force had overwhelmed several nearby bunkers. He rushed one of the captured fortifications, killed the occupant, and obtained rounds for his rifle. He was racing back toward the northern end when an enemy grenade detonated near him, spraying his legs with shrapnel. Noticing that the platoon radio-telephone operator lay helplessly wounded near the center of the bridge, and despite his own wounds, he crawled to the aid of the injured man. Sergeant Sizemore remained by his comrade as the ruthless assailants closed in from both sides. While attempting to hold the enemy at bay, he was mortally wounded by rifle fire. Sergeant Sizemore's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 2672 (July 17, 1969)
Home Town: Manchester, Kentucky

*SKAGGS, LONNIE G.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Lonnie G. Skaggs (US55885152), Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company A, 2d Battalion, 28th Infantry, 1st Infantry Division. Specialist Four Skaggs distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 27 April 1967, near Ben Suc, Republic of Vietnam. Specialist Skaggs was serving as a machine gunner on a search and destroy mission when his company was suddenly engaged by a hostile force. Seeing that the point man was instantly wounded, Specialist Skaggs moved quickly to the front and engaged the enemy allowing the company medic to move to the wounded man's aid. Under the covering fire of Specialist Skaggs, the company began withdrawing to allow artillery and airstrikes on the hostile positions. Exhausting his supply of ammunition, Specialist Skaggs called for an additional supply. When he was resupplied, Specialist Skaggs moved forward and exposed himself to the heaviest enemy fire by standing on top of a bunker, and continued placing suppressive fire on the hostile forces until all wounded were evacuated and the entire company had withdrawn. When the artillery fire and air strikes were completed, the company started back to the battle area. Specialist Skaggs volunteered for point man on the return trip. Moving into the battle area, the company was again engaged with heavy automatic weapons fire and command-detonated Claymore mines. Four men were wounded in the first few moments from a well-emplaced Viet Cong machinegun. Realizing that the Viet Cot machinegun position had the wounded pinned down and also was keeping medics from giving aid, Specialist Skaggs immediately assaulted the Viet Cong position, continuously firing his machinegun. On the verge of overrunning the hostile position, Specialist Skaggs was mortally wounded. Before succumbing to his wounds, Specialist Skaggs thrust his machinegun forward in such a manner as to insure it would continue to fire on the hostile position until the supply of ammunition was exhausted. This final heroic act resulted in the complete elimination of the Viet Cong position, enabled the friendly forces to evacuate the wounded without sustaining heavier casualties and undoubtedly saved the lives of many men of Company A. Specialist Skagg's extraordinary heroism and intrepidity at the risk of his life, above and beyond the call of duty, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Army and reflect great credit upon himself, and the Armed Forces of his country.
Department of the Army, General Orders No. 38 (July 31, 1968)
Home Town: Gary, Indiana

*SMITH, AVERY GENE
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Avery Gene Smith (US52614620), Private First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Troop A, 1st Squadron, 4th Cavalry, 1st Infantry Division. Private First Class Smith distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 8 June 1966 while serving as tank loader on an armored convoy during a combat operations along Highway 13. While moving toward their objective, Private First Class Smith's column of armored vehicles was ambushed by a large Viet Cong force. Private First Class Smith unhesitatingly climbed outside to the exposed rear of the tank and began delivering suppressive fire upon the onrushing Viet Cong. Throughout the heaviest fighting of the engagement, he remained at this unprotected position and repelled the assaulting insurgents at point-blank range. During the course of action, Private First Class Smith was wounded in the face by shrapnel. Despite the severity of his wound, he remained at this self-appointed post and continued to protect his tank and other nearby vehicles. At one point during the battle, when the tank's main gun and machine guns were inoperable, Private First Class Smith's efforts alone prevented the vehicle from being overrun by the numerically superior Viet Cong force. When his tank received its fourth direct hit from Viet Cong fire, Private First Class Smith absorbed the brunt of the explosion and was mortally wounded. His extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty at the cost of his life were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 5964 (October 7, 1966)
Home Town: Russell Springs, Kentucky

*SMITH, JACK RAE
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Jack Rae Smith (479-64-2135), Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company B, 2d Battalion, 12th Infantry, 25th Infantry Division. Specialist Four Smith distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 31 March 1970 while on a sweep mission in Binh Duong Province. Specialist Smith was providing forward security for his patrol when an intense barrage of hostile fire was directed at the group from a nearby enemy element. From his forward position, Specialist Smith placed suppressive fire on the enemy that enabled his comrades to move forward. As his comrades neared his position, an enemy grenade landed a few feet from Specialist Smith. Without hesitation, he seized the grenade and attempted to hurl it back toward the enemy soldiers. However, before he could release the grenade, it detonated in his hand, mortally wounding him. Although Specialist Smith forfeited his own life, he successfully shielded his nearby comrades from the deadly shrapnel and prevented any additional loss of life. Specialist Four Smith's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 3728 (August 11, 1970)
Home Town: Clarion, Iowa

SMITH, JAMES H.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to James H. Smith, Sergeant First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company D, 3d Battalion, 1st Infantry, Americal Division. Sergeant First Class Smith distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 29 March 1969 while acting as platoon leader on a company combat sweep mission southwest of Duc Pho. When another platoon became pinned down by a large North Vietnamese force, Sergeant Smith immediately proceeded to move his platoon to their rescue. Because of insufficient cover from the heavy hostile barrage, he could maneuver no closer than one hundred meters to the beleaguered element. Sergeant Smith called in the assistance of gun ships and armored personnel carriers. Realizing that hostile and friendly positions had to be differentiated before an air strike was made, he started crawling forward into the fusillade. When a North Vietnamese position poured strafing fire on him, he retaliated with rifle and grenade volleys, effectively silencing the emplacement. As he marked the positions with smoke grenades, a burst of hostile fire wounded him in the face and shoulder. He, nonetheless, continued his mission until the gun ships arrived and his medical evacuation was made possible. Sergeant First Class Smith's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 2471 (July 9, 1969)

*SMITH, LYNN HUDSON
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Lynn Hudson Smith (0-5336701), First Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army (Reserve), for extraordinary heroism in action while serving as a Platoon Leader with Company A, 3d Battalion, 47th Infantry, 9th Infantry Division in the Republic of Vietnam on 1 February 1968. On this date, Company A was conducting a sweep mission in the city of My Tho when its lead element was suddenly attacked and pinned down by a well-entrenched Viet Cong force. Upon observing that the company was unable to move to the assistance of the point element, Lieutenant Smith courageously led his platoon through the intense hostile fire in an attempt to reach the endangered point element. Fighting his way from house to house, Lieutenant Smith brought his men to the edge of a large open area where they were once again pinned down by the enemy fusillade. Realizing that the members of the point element would have to be brought to safety before artillery could be called in, Lieutenant Smith, unmindful of his personal safety, made several attempts to lead a party of his men across the fire-swept area but was forced to turn back each time because of the extremely heavy enemy fire. Determined to rescue the lead element, Lieutenant Smith sighted an unoccupied jeep, ran to it, and drove it through the murderous barrage of enemy fire to the point element. After loading the wounded members of the point element onto the jeep, he started back through the enemy's zone of fire and had almost reached cover when he was mortally wounded by an enemy round. Lieutenant Smith's gallant actions enabled the point men to reach safety and contributed significantly to his company's efforts to drive the Viet Cong from the city. Lieutenant Smith's extraordinary heroism and concern for his comrades-in-arms were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit and the United States Army.
Department of the Army, General Orders No. 58 (September 24, 1969)
Home Town: Cudahy, Wisconsin

SMITH, MARK A.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Mark A. Smith, Captain (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force while serving as the Senior Battalion Liaison Officer to the 9th Infantry Regiment, 5th Infantry Division, Army of the Republic of Vietnam, during the period 5 April 1972 to 7 April 1972. On 5 April 1972, North Vietnamese and Viet Cong forces launched a major offensive with the objective of capturing Binh Long Province in Military Region Three. The 5th Viet Cong Division was targeted against Loc Ninh the capital of Loc Ninh District in northern Binh Long Province. The 5th Viet Cong Division launched a massive coordinated ground attack against Loc Ninh beginning early in the morning of 5 April 1972. The attack was supported by artillery and tanks. Captain smith skillfully directed tactical airstrikes and helicopter gunships in support of the 9th Infantry Regiment and other South Vietnamese forces in the area. To inflict the maximum casualties on the enemy and to bring the fires as close as possible to the friendly forces, he left the safety of his bunker and moved throughout the area seeking strategic vantage points from which he directed friendly fire. Time and time again he directed the fighters, bombers, gunships, and artillery fire on top of his own position to drive off the attacking enemy. The combination of Captain Smith's courage and professional skills coupled with all available firepower kept the numerically enemy at bay for more than two days. Captain Smith's extraordinary heroism was in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Army and reflected great credit upon himself and the military service.
Department of the Army, General Orders No. 30 (September 18, 1973)

SMITH, NORWOOD W., JR.
Synopsis:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Norwood W. Smith, Jr., Warrant Officer, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam. Warrant Officer Norwood distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 26 October 1971. His extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Department of the Army, General Orders No. 40 (October 27, 1972)
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SMITH, PATRICK R.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Patrick R. Smith (RA17738393), Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in action in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Troop L, 3d Battalion, 11th Armored Cavalry Regiment. Sergeant Smith distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 11 January 1968 as an armored assault vehicle commander on a reconnaissance-in-force mission near Loc Ninh. His column was taken under an extremely heavy volume of automatic weapons and small arms fire from an insurgent force concealed in dense vegetation along the roadway. The dismounted elements which flanked the formation were pinned down immediately. Seeing this, Sergeant Smith directed his track against the enemy positions. Four direct rocket hits inflicted severe wounds on him and several of his crew and caused his vehicle to burst into flames. Although dazed and in great pain, Sergeant Smith continued to direct a lethal volley of machine gun fire on the insurgents, enabling the ground troops to maneuver into a better defensive position. He then began evacuating his wounded crew members from the flaming vehicle. Observing several Viet Cong rushing the track to take its weapons and ammunition, Sergeant Smith quickly returned to it and annihilated the onrushing force with machine gun fire. Flames in the vehicle caused it to explode, blowing him out of the commander's hatch. Disregarding his additional wounds and burns, he freed the trapped driver and evacuated the man to an aid station. Refusing medical attention for himself, Sergeant Smith continued to fight until the enemy was routed and driven into the jungle. Sergeant Smith's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 3117 (June 29, 1968)

SMITH, PAUL F.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Paul F. Smith (0-33169), Major General, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Headquarters, 173d Airborne Brigade. Major General Smith distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 19 November 1966 while commanding the 173d Airborne Brigade on a search and destroy operation near Minh Thanh. Despite the extreme hazards involved, he boldly chose to visit a forward patrol base that had been under sniper and claymore mine attack for three days. At the time General Smith arrived, the perimeter was only manned by a skeleton force, but he insisted upon visiting the troops that were on line. Within ten minutes, two platoon patrols outside the camp were pinned down by a large Viet Cong force and the perimeter was again ravaged by intense hostile fire. Unmindful of the dangers, General Smith refused to take cover and calmly proceeded among the defenders, encouraging the men in their foxholes. Throughout the three-hour battle, he provided tactical advice to his subordinate commanders. At one point, the elements under severest attack were perilously low on ammunition, but because of devastating ground fire aerial re-supply was prevented. With complete disregard for his safety, General Smith fearlessly exposed himself to the hail of bullets and directed an armed helicopter strike on the charging Viet Cong. This courageous and timely action enabled the supply aircraft to land and allowed the besieged camp to finally repel the insurgent force. Later after the wounded had been evacuated, he conduced an aerial reconnaissance of the area an discovered a large cache of rice and supplies. His unimpeachable valor and profound concern for his men turned impending disaster into a major victory over a numerically superior hostile force. Major General Smith's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 497 (February 1, 1967)

SMITH, RALPH
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Ralph Smith (US53438628), Specialist Fourth Class [then Private First Class], U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company C, 2d Battalion, 27th Infantry, 2d Brigade, 25th Infantry Division. Specialist Four Smith distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 16 May 1967 while serving as squad leader with an infantry company on a night assault mission near Ap Rach Gau. While moving across a rice paddy to join with a company trapped by a numerically superior enemy unit, his platoon was attacked by a well entrenched Viet Cong force firing machine guns and automatic weapons. Seeing his machine gunner killed, Specialist Smith grabbed the weapon and led a fierce attack on the nearest enemy bunker. After killing the protecting riflemen with an accurate volley, he placed the muzzle of his weapon into the firing port and destroyed the position with a deadly burst of fire. He saw a platoon of Viet Cong escaping across an open field and ran to a dike to attempt to halt them. Ignoring a hail of bullets striking all around him, he stood up and inflicted heavy casualties with volley after volley of deadly fire. Regrouping his men, he led a furious charge on the determined insurgents which defeated them and forced them to withdraw. His courageous actions inspired his men to greater heights and contributed immeasurable to the success of the mission. Specialist Four Smith's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 4967 (September 28, 1967)

*SNELL, ROBERT MICHAEL
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Robert Michael Snell (464-72-5019), Captain (Artillery), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Headquarters and Headquarters Battery, 2d Battalion, 320th Artillery, 101st Airborne Division. Captain Snell distinguished himself on 14 June 1969 while serving as an artillery liaison officer to the 327th Infantry. In the early morning hours, an intense mortar attack followed by a ground assault was launched against Fire Support Base Berchtesgaden. When the first enemy rounds hit, several personnel were injured and in need of immediate medical attention. Captain Snell, with complete disregard for his own safety, moved fifty meters from his protected bunker through the heavy volume of enemy mortar fire to assist the wounded. He carried one wounded soldier back to the safety of the bunker and was going out the bunker door to retrieve another man when a round impacted at his feet and mortally wounded him. Captain Snell's unselfish dedication to his fellow soldiers was directly responsible for saving the life of the man he had carried to safety. Captain Snell's extraordinary heroism and dedication to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 166 (January 19, 1970)
Born: February 14, 1944 at Fort Worth, Texas
Home Town: Lamesa, Texas

SNODDY, HAROLD M.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Harold M. Snoddy, Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company D, 2d Battalion, 12th Cavalry, 1st Cavalry Division (Airmobile). Sergeant Snoddy distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 12 May 1969 during an enemy rocket attack followed by a ground assault on Landing Zone Grant. Almost immediately after the attack began, a contingent of sappers managed to overtake four perimeter bunkers. Sergeant Snoddy, who had volunteered to join the reaction force, quickly moved toward the threatened area to repel the assailants. As he made his way through the hail of enemy fire, he observed several hostile soldiers just outside the berm preparing to launch a B-40 rocket. Unleashing a salvo of rifle fire, he eliminated the position. He resumed his advance on the enemy-held bunkers, and despite being thrown to the ground again and again by the concussion of satchel charges, he succeeded in recapturing a perimeter bunker by killing the enemy with hand grenades. From that position he hurled grenades into a nearby fortification, routing the hostile soldiers. He then pursued the retreating troopers as they withdrew to another bunker. In spite of sustaining a fragmentation wound, he continued to advance and killed two of the communists before they reached the bunker. Fearing that the position contained injured American personnel, he refrained from employing grenades and single-handedly charged the bunker to silence the remainder of the enemy force. Inside the bunker, he discovered a wounded comrade whom he treated and evacuated to safety. Sergeant Snoddy's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 3396 (September 4, 1969)

SNYDER, ROBERT A.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Robert A. Snyder (OF-103628), Captain (Artillery), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Battery B, 7th Battalion, 11th Artillery, 25th Infantry Division. Captain Snyder distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 18 August 1968 while serving as a battery commander at a fire support base camp near Nui Ba Den. Under cover of a barrage of rockets, mortars, rocket-propelled grenades and automatic weapons, an estimated North Vietnamese regiment attacked the camp. During the initial barrage, a tank twenty meters to the battery's front received a direct hit from an enemy rocket-propelled grenade. Captain Snyder immediately moved through the fusillade to aid the wounded crew members. Injured by fragments from an enemy rocket, Captain Snyder refused medical attention as he evacuated the casualties out of the killing zone to safety. He then returned to his battery and moved from howitzer to howitzer, encouraging his men and pointing out targets. During the battle, he spotted North Vietnamese troops attempting to breach the perimeter. He again exposed himself to the murderous fire as he killed three of the hostile soldiers. The following morning Captain Snyder led a squad in a sweep of the perimeter, capturing four of the aggressors. Captain Snyder's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 5582 (December 3, 1968)

SOPPE, RONALD J.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Ronald J. Soppe (US54928149), Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company A, 1st Battalion (Mechanized), 5th Infantry, 2d Brigade, 25th Infantry Division. Specialist Four Soppe distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 11 September 1968 while serving as a medical aidman during an enemy assault on the Ben Cui rubber plantation. His company was attacked at its night logger location by an estimated enemy battalion. Specialist Soppe immediately began moving from position to position under the aggressors' barrage of antitank rocket, machine gun and small arms fire, searching for casualties and administering first aid. When a nearby armored vehicle was set on fire by a direct hit, he ran to the track and quickly extinguished the blaze. Attempting to reach an injured comrade, he was severely wounded in the arm by fragments from an enemy rocket. Disregarding his own welfare, he continued on to the wounded man, treated him and carried him to a safe position. Despite his painful wound, Specialist Soppe constantly exposed himself to hostile fire as he went to the aid of six other injured soldiers. Alter the battle, he helped load the wounded on a helicopter and remained behind in case of a second assault. Specialist Four Soppe's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 5845 (December 26, 1968)
Home Town: West Union, Iowa

*SOSA, ARISTIDES
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Aristides Sosa (US52758743), Corporal [then Private First Class], U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company A, 65th Engineer Battalion, 25th Infantry Division. Corporal Sosa distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 2 March 1968. On this date, Corporal Sosa was part of a four-man engineer team accompanying an infantry unit on a reconnaissance-in-force operation in the vicinity of Lai Theiu when the friendly force came under attack from Claymore mines, automatic weapons and small arms fire. Moments after he had reached cover in a ditch, there was a devastating explosion nearby and he was painfully wounded. As one of his comrades crawled to his position to offer assistance, an enemy grenade was detected flying through the air toward Corporal Sosa's position. As the grenade landed and began rolling toward his comrade, Corporal Sosa rolled on top of the grenade to save the soldier from its blast and was mortally wounded by the exploding grenade. His courageous actions in complete disregard for his own safety were responsible for saving the life of his comrade. Corporal Sosa's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Department of the Army, General Orders No. 80 (December 16, 1968)
Home Town: New York, New York

*SOWELL, RONALD
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Ronald Sowell (165-40-7520), Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam while serving with Company A, 2d Battalion, 12th Infantry, 25th Infantry Division. Specialist Four Sowell distinguished himself on 24 October 1969 while serving as a medic during an airmobile operation. On this date his company came under intense automatic weapons fire from an enemy force in a well-fortified bunker complex. the friendly element assaulted the hostile emplacements three times, attempting to rout the enemy from their positions. During the final assault the third platoon suffered numerous casualties and Specialist Sowell began to maneuver through the hostile fusillade to their aid. He crawled to within five feet of an enemy bunker to treat a wounded comrade and then carried him to the relative safety of the friendly defensive lines where he insured the casualty would receive treatment. Again he returned through the hail of enemy rounds to help another wounded soldier and while evacuating him Specialist Sowell was seriously wounded by rifle fire. After bringing his fellow soldier to safety, he received medical attention but refused evacuation. Despite the withering volley of fire, he again advanced to within five feet of an occupied bunker to administer aid to another wounded man. As he was carrying the soldier back to cover behind the perimeter, Specialist Sowell was shot again and fatally wounded. He managed to drag his comrade to cover before succumbing. His courage and devotion to duty at the sacrifice of his own life saved the lives of two of his comrades. Specialist Four Sowell's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 4390 (December 6, 1969)
Home Town: Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

SPACKMAN, PHILIP L.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Philip L. Spackman, First Lieutenant (Armor), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Troop E, 1st Cavalry Regiment, Americal Division. First Lieutenant Spackman distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 2 July 1969 while serving as platoon leader during a unit patrol operation in the Rice Bowl district near An Lao. As the lead armored personnel carrier crossed a stream and penetrated a hedgerow, it was struck simultaneously be several rocket grenades, wounding all the occupants. A hostile force of North Vietnamese began moving down the stream bed to cut off the damaged vehicle from the rest of the troop. Lieutenant Spackman immediately killed the nearest enemy soldier and repelled the rest of the assailants. While reinforcements secured the river crossing, he dashed to the vehicle through strafing automatic weapons fire and removed the casualties from exposure to direct fire. Then he and the less severely wounded carried the injured across the stream. Deploying the other vehicles along the river bank to engage the hostile positions beyond the hedgerow, he directed their firing as well as that of the gunships which had arrived. He also established communication with and assisted the commander of an Infantry element that had been airlifted near the enemy force. When the infantrymen began advancing on the communists' flank, Lieutenant Spackman maneuvered his armored personnel carriers on line and rolled toward the enemy positions. Encountering stiff resistance from one bunker, he directed his driver to rush the position. Firing from atop his tracked vehicle, Lieutenant Spackman pinned the enemy down until his vehicle passed by the position into which he threw several grenades, which destroyed the structure and killed the enemy. With the last bunker eliminated, the enemy were routed from the area. First Lieutenant Spackman's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 3625 (September 25, 1969)

*SPEER, RICHARD MICHAEL
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Richard Michael Speer (263-98-8716), First Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company D, 2d Battalion, 12th Cavalry, 1st Cavalry Division (Airmobile). First Lieutenant Speer distinguished himself while leading a platoon during combat operations in Phuoc Long Province. Following a brief engagement with an enemy element, Lieutenant Speer led his platoon in pursuit of the fleeing enemy in order to maintain contact with them. After a short chase, the lieutenant noticed several enemy soldiers lying in ambush on the trail ahead. He immediately placed devastating fire on the enemy while his platoon took cover. Constantly exposing himself to the enemy return fire, lieutenant Speer moved among his men, shouting encouragement and directing their fire. When his radio operator was wounded by the intensified enemy fire, he administered aid to him. Lieutenant Speer then directed artillery fire within meters of his position causing the enemy to flee with heavy casualties. Throughout the battle, he maintained complete control of the tactical situation until he was mortally wounded by enemy fire. First Lieutenant Speer's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 4069 (August 31, 1970)
Home Town: Plant City, Florida

SPEERS, MAX DALE
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Max Dale Speers (RA17519203), Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Detachment A-321, Company A, 5th Special Forces (Airborne), 1st Special Forces. Sergeant Speers distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 21 November, 1966 while serving as Special Forces advisor to an irregular Vietnamese force during a search and destroy mission near Ben Soi. Sergeant Speers company was taking night perimeter positions when Viet Cong launched a mortar, rocket and machine gun attack on the unit, followed by a human wave assault from all directions. Although he was knocked to the ground by a mortar explosion early in the barrage, he grabbed a radio, quickly surveyed the camps defenses and radioed for air support. He remained exposed to hostile fire continuously while marking friendly positions with smoke to guide supporting aircraft, and while directing Vietnamese soldiers into better positions to repel the enemy attacks. As the situation became more desperate, he called in aerial ordnance on top of his own position because the Viet Cong had pressed so close to him, cutting him off from his troops. When a nearby companion was wounded, Sergeant Speers gave him first aid and dragged him to temporary safety. The insurgents continued their advance, so he directed aircraft to fire directly behind him as he dragged the casualty to a woodline. He joined the rest of his men, placed them into a defensive perimeter around a landing zone, and called for ammunition supply and medical evacuation helicopters. Without an interpreter, and under constant, intense fire, Sergeant Speers personally controlled the Vietnamese soldiers defending the landing zone until helicopters arrived with reinforcements and ammunition. His company was vastly outnumbered, but the remained calm through out the critical battle and retained control of the situation. By his courageous leadership, he saved his company and dealt the insurgents heavy losses. Sergeant Speers extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 3683 (July 20, 1967)

SPENCE, RICHARD G.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Richard G. Spence, Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company D, 1st Battalion, 22d Infantry, 4th Infantry Division. Sergeant Spence distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 5 April 1969 while serving as squad leader. As his company was moving through the hills west of Kontum, a North Vietnamese force opened fire with rockets, mortars and small arms. Because two of his men were cut off from the rest of the squad during the initial exchange of fire, Sergeant Spence quickly maneuvered through the hostile barrage to the isolated men and led them back to the squad's position. He then called in and adjusted supporting fire from gunships and artillery. Observing two enemy soldiers preparing to launch a rocket on his position, he immediately shot both and then turned to eliminate three who were flanking his squad's position. On three separate occasions when hostile forces stormed the element's location, Sergeant Spence met the brunt of the assault and repelled the assailants with determined volleys of rifle fire. Crawling forward in order to destroy a bunker and its occupants, he encountered a wounded comrade whom he carried to safety. When the enemy initiated an intense mortar barrage, he maneuvered through enemy-held terrain to silence the mortar emplacement with well-thrown grenades. Sergeant Spence's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 4179 (November 18, 1968)

SPERLING, RICHARD A.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Richard A. Sperling (0-5535948), First Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with 155th Assault Helicopter Company, 52d Combat Aviation Battalion, 17th Combat Aviation Group, 1st Aviation Brigade. First Lieutenant Sperling distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions as aircraft commander of a helicopter assault mission near Duc Co. As the infantry was being inserted into a suspected enemy position, all ships in the lead elements came under heavy fire in the landing zone. Armed helicopters and bombers were called in but were unsuccessful in silencing the heavily fortified enemy positions. As Lieutenant Sperling's element departed the landing zone, one of the helicopters received an intense burst of enemy automatic weapons fire which crippled it and caused it to crash. Despite advice not to land again because of the murderous insurgent fusillade, Lieutenant Sperling volunteered to attempt a rescue. He touched down in a small clearing one hundred and fifty meters from the wreckage, departed his aircraft, and plunged into the enemy-infested jungle. As he moved toward the downed crew, he was repeatedly subjected to insurgent sniper fire and mortar explosions. Braving the heavy barrage, he arrived at the burning aircraft and found that the enemy was rapidly closing on the crash site. Inspiring the downed crew members by his courage, Lieutenant Sperling led them back toward his waiting aircraft through a hail of bullets and shrapnel. He assisted them aboard the ship and flew out of the jungle clearing just as the enemy penetrated the surrounding treeline. Lieutenant Sperling's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 3212 (July 6, 1968)
Home Town: Macomber, Maryland

SPINAIO, EDWARD W.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Edward W. Spinaio, Captain (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Advisory Team 100, United States Military Assistance Command, Vietnam. Captain Spinaio distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 12 January 1969 while serving as advisor to a Vietnamese Ranger battalion at Fire Support Base Dot located five kilometers from the Cambodian border in Tay Ninh Province. Learning that one company had encountered a North Vietnamese bunker complex during a sweep operation, Captain Spinaio quickly organized a relief force and joined the besieged unit. When the indigenous company commander was wounded by fire from a hostile bunker, Captain Spinaio single-handedly stormed the fortification and destroyed it with hand grenades. He then proceeded to move the wounded to the evacuation point. As the men were being loaded on the helicopter, two enemy soldiers charged the landing site in an attempt to damage the aircraft. Captain Spinaio shot both assailants, enabling the extraction to be completed successfully. Captain Spinaio's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 3124 (July 6, 1968)

SPITZ, JAMES D.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to James D. Spitz, Sergeant First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company A, 3d Battalion, 187th Infantry, 101st Airborne Division (Airborne). Sergeant First Class Spitz distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on the morning of 27 March 1969 at Fire Support Base Jack. When a heavy concentration of hostile mortar fire began to pound the base, Sergeant Spitz dashed to his mortar section and began supervising the firing of high-explosive and illumination rounds. As the incoming barrage slackened and the enemy initiated a ground assault, he moved along the perimeter bunker line to direct the defense. While making his way through the fusillade of enemy rocket grenades, he encountered four communists storming the berm. Sergeant Spitz immediately charged the four enemy soldiers and drove them back. Before the hostile force could obtain reinforcements and attempt another assault, Sergeant Spitz regrouped the men along that section of the perimeter. Six of the enemy returned with satchel charges and rocket-propelled grenades, but Sergeant Spits' intrepid counterattack drove them back once more. While gunships riddled the area outside the berm, Sergeant Spitz directed his attention to the M-42 self-propelled gun crew's tent which had been struck by enemy fire. He rushed to help remove the wounded and then assisted in firing the M-42 gun at the charging enemy. Sergeant First Class Spitz's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 3399 (September 4, 1969)

*SPRINGER, CHARLES A.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Charles A. Springer (0-5318092), Captain (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company B, 2d Battalion, 27th Infantry, 2d Brigade, 25th Infantry Division. Captain Springer distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 12 November 1967 while serving as commander of an infantry company conducting a search and destroy operation deep in enemy controlled territory. As the company moved through a clearing late in the afternoon, it suddenly received savage automatic weapons fire from a Viet Cong force occupying well fortified positions in a nearby tree line. Fire from a well-emplaced machine gun pinned the unit down. With complete disregard for his own safety, Captain Springer charged across the bullet-swept terrain toward the enemy bunker complex. Throwing grenades into the Viet Cong machine gun position, he single-handedly destroyed it, killing two insurgents and capturing the machine gun and a rifle. Throughout the ensuing battle, he courageously directed his company's retaliatory fire, while continually exposed to a hail of hostile bullets. When the enemy had been routed, Captain Springer reorganized his men and directed them toward another objective. The company had moved only two hundred meters when intense automatic weapons and machine gun fire erupted from both flanks, again pinning the unit down. With bullets striking all around him, Captain Springer rushed to his forward element, regrouped the men, and directed their defensive fires. He was mortally wounded during this savage fight to repel the enemy. His unhesitating actions and personal bravery, in close combat, inspired his troops to succeed in overcoming and destroying the numerically superior insurgent force. Captain Springer's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 6637 (December 27, 1967)
Home Town: Memphis, Tennessee

*SPROULE, WILLIAM C., JR.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to William C. Sproule, Jr. (0-5338726), First Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company B, 3d Battalion (Airborne), 503d Infantry, 173d Airborne Brigade. First Lieutenant Sproule distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 10 May 1968 as a platoon leader of an airborne infantry company conducting a combat operation. His platoon made heavy contact with a large North Vietnamese force. During the assault on the enemy, Lieutenant Sproule moved out ahead of his men to fire more accurately on the insurgents and to adjust supporting artillery fire. As he advanced, he was hit in the chest by a burst of enemy automatic rifle fire. Ignoring his wounds, he moved to his point man who had been pinned down during the initial exchange of fire. Lieutenant Sproule provided covering fire for the man as he crawled back to join the rest of the platoon. He then adjusted artillery fire on the North Vietnamese positions, bringing it so close to his own location that he was wounded several times by the shrapnel. An enemy machine gun to his front began placing deadly fire on his platoon, and he attempted to direct the artillery on the emplacement to destroy it. This couldn't be accomplished without moving his platoon back. Rather than risk more casualties to his troops in a withdrawal, Lieutenant Sproule assaulted the position alone. He charged to within five meters of the gun, firing on the enemy the entire way, before he was mortally wounded by a burst of heavy fire from the weapon. First Lieutenant Sproule's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 3685 (August 1, 1968)
Home Town: Folcroft, Pennsylvania

*SQUIRES, DAVID RAY
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to David Ray Squires (US52647587), Specialist Fifth Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 2d Battalion, 60th Infantry, 1st Brigade, 9th Infantry Division. Specialist Five Squires distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 3 June 1968 While serving as a medic during a search and clear operation in Dinh Tuong Province. Although his own unit was assigned to base camp security and not committed to battle, Specialist Squires volunteered to aid another battalion which was in contact with the Viet Cong and receiving many casualties. He was flown by helicopter to an area of fierce fighting. once on the ground, Specialist Squires constantly exposed himself for a period of three hours to the aggressors' heavy automatic, rocket and small arms fire to administer first aid and assist in carrying wounded men to safe evacuation points. Informed that a casualty lay exposed to the hostile fusillade only twenty-five meters from a communist bunker, he went sixty meters beyond the front line to reach the man. As he bandaged his injured comrade, he was mortally wounded by enemy fire. his courage and professional treatment saved many lives and contributed greatly to his fellow soldiers' moral. Specialist Five Squires' extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 5037 (October 31, 1968)
Home Town: Louisville, Kentucky

STAHL, LEONARD C.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Leonard C. Stahl (0-5324855), Second Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving as American Advisor to the 1st Battalion, 14th Regiment, Army of the Republic of Vietnam. On 25 March 1966, Lieutenant Stahl, while serving as battalion advisor, was accompanying the unit on a mission to secure an outpost that was under construction. When the lead elements of the battalion made sudden unexpected contact with a reinforced Viet Cong company, Lieutenant Stahl, disregarding his own personal safety, moved forward rapidly under intense automatic and small arms fire to ascertain locations and dispositions of the Viet Cong forces. In so doing, he came in direct contact with a Viet Dong squad, killed three immediately, seriously wounding one, and captured another, while the remaining Viet Cong hastily retreated. When he ran out of ammunition, Lieutenant Stahl took ammunition from nearby Vietnamese soldiers who had moved forward to investigate the encounter and he then returned through intense automatic weapons fire being received from the flank to search for his assistant who was missing. After finding him seriously wounded, Lieutenant Stahl without hesitation carried the wounded man across 300 meters of open rice fields being swept with deadly machine gun fire. Lieutenant Stahl then voluntarily returned to the front where he could effectively direct artillery and armed helicopter fire into the prepared hostile positions. Lieutenant Stahl's courageous actions not only saved the life of his assistant but permitted the battalion to successfully accomplish its mission. Second Lieutenant Stahl's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Pacific, General Orders No. 207 (August 26, 1966)

*STAHL, PHILLIP THOMAS (MIA)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Phillip Thomas Stahl (RA12638984), Specialist Fifth Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Detachment A-102, 5th Special Forces Group (Airborne), 1st Special Forces. During the period 9 and 10 March 1966, Special forces Detachment A-102 was attacked by two Viet Cong regiments at Camp A Shau, Republic of Vietnam. On the morning of 9 March 1966, Specialist Stahl, the team medic, took his position on the camp's south wall. The insurgents began the attack with mortar and small arms fire inflicting heavy casualties on the friendly forces. With complete disregard for his own personal safety, Specialist Stahl exposed himself to drag the wounded from the open to areas of safety in order that he might treat their wounds. He was constantly running from position to position giving medical aid to the wounded. While doing this, he received two painful wounds, one in his left forearm, partially paralyzing his hand, and the other in his right leg. Despite these wounds he again braved the intense fire to rescue several Americans lying wounded in the center of the camp. Through the remainder of the day he continued in giving medical aid to the wounded while paying little attention to his own painful wounds, and also helped in the evacuation of his comrades while refusing to be evacuated himself. On the morning of 10 March 1966, the Viet Cong launched another regimental sized infantry assault. Personally manning a machine gun, he killed numerous insurgents as they threw wave after wave against Specialist Stahl's position. His find example of courage helped the defenders stall the Viet Cong main assault. Once more the insurgents mounted a full scale assault and Specialist Stahl returned to his position to continue firing the machine gun until the barrel glowed red hot. He resisted the onslaught by killing scores of attackers. As the insurgents moved within grenade range, Specialist Stahl was mortally wounded. Specialist Five Stahl's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Pacific, General Orders No. 163 (July 18, 1966)
Home Town: Pompano Beach, Florida

STARK, PETER M.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Peter M. Stark (RA13831603), Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Detachment A-362, Company A, 5th Special Forces (Airborne), 1st Special Forces. Sergeant Stark distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 4 January 1968 as medic of a Special Forces patrol on a combat mission in Tay Ninh Province. Shortly after infiltration into the area of operations, the team located vacated enemy bunkers, huts and a base camp. The patrol found a storage area showing signs of recent use, and deployed along a trail to ambush Viet Cong elements that might approach it. Three enemy soldiers moved into the trap and one was taken prisoner. Sergeant Stark immediately treated the man for wounds he suffered in the ambush. The team then came under attack from an unknown size enemy force and moved toward a helicopter landing zone for extraction. Sergeant Stark repeatedly halted under the intense enemy fire to administer lifesaving treatment to the prisoner. He and the prisoner were among the first to be loaded aboard the rescue helicopter. As the pilot readied for takeoff, the ship was hit by a devastating barrage of rocket grenades, machine gun and automatic weapons fire. The craft became airborne but crashed thirty meters from the landing zone. Sergeant Stark had had both legs severed by the exploding rocket grenades. Completely disregarding his painful wounds, he crawled across the crash site to treat a severely injured comrade. When another soldier came to his aid, Sergeant Stark directed the man to treat the casualty while applying tourniquets to his own legs. He refused to be pulled out of the line of continuing enemy fire until the other wounded were moved to safety. Sergeant Stark's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 2681 (June 4, 1968)

STARR, WILLIAM J.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to William J. Starr, Captain (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company C, 1st Battalion, 62st Infantry, 1st Brigade, 5th Infantry (Mechanized). Captain Starr distinguished himself while commanding a mechanized infantry company during a battalion sized reconnaissance-in-force operation just south of the Demilitarized Zone in northern I Corps Tactical Zone. As the friendly force was sweeping through a valley near the village of Cam Lo, it became engaged in fighting with elements of the 27th North Vietnamese Army Regiment. In the initial movement to contact, the First Platoon of Captain Starr's company was surrounded by enemy troops and pinned down by a heavy concentration of rocket propelled grenades and automatic weapons fire. Captain Starr quickly assembled a reaction force and led it in a rapid counter assault over some hundred meters of terrain swept by grenade and small arms fire. As he attempted to maneuver his relief force on the flank of the enemy's fortified gun emplacements, Captain Starr and his men were suddenly caught in an ambush of enemy grenades. When one grenade landed in the foxhole in which he and several comrades took cover, Captain Starr immediately scooped up the explosive device and attempted to throw it away, but before he could get the grenade off, the device exploded, severing his hand and part of his arm. Captain Starr's body absorbed the entire force of the blast, preventing any injury to the men who were with him. Captain Starr's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 1342 (May 22, 1970)

STEELEY, NOBLE L.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Noble L. Steeley (US55987783), Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Troop A, 1st Squadron, 9th Cavalry, 1st Cavalry Division (Airmobile). Specialist Four Steeley distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 20 August 1968 while serving as a helicopter door gunner on a combat mission near Quang Tri. When several attempts to evacuate three wounded soldiers had failed, Specialist Steeley volunteered to go to their assistance. Inserted under heavy fire less than twenty meters from the communists, he ran to the men and found that two were still alive. He placed one of the wounded in the helicopter, but intense hostile fire forced the ship to leave before the other injured man could be brought aboard. Refusing to re-enter the helicopter, Specialist Steeley stayed with the remaining wounded man for an hour and forty-five minutes, while under continuous fire from positions as close as fifteen feet. During this time he directed helicopter gunships to the enemy positions and before a ground unit finally reached him, he had killed six of the aggressors. Specialist Four Steeley's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 5770 (December 18, 1968)

STEFFENSEN, DENNIS C.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Dennis C. Steffensen (RA16923459), Private First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company A, 2d Battalion, 14th Infantry, 1st Brigade, 25th Infantry Division. Private First Class Steffensen distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 16 February 1968 while serving with an infantry unit conducting a reconnaissance-in-force operation near Tay Ninh. His company was attacked by an estimated Viet Cong battalion firing from well fortified positions. Seeking cover behind a nearby brick wall, Private Steffensen delivered intense suppressive fire on the insurgents while an assault was organized. During two successive assaults on the enemy positions, the Viet Cong inflicted heavy casualties to the friendly troops, causing them to withdraw and regroup. Completely disregarding his own safety, Private Steffensen charged the enemy emplacements a third time, and, despite the rocket and automatic weapons fire directed toward him, he silenced one of the bunkers. He then began carrying the wounded from the battlefield to cover, continually exposing himself to enemy fire. Moments after he had retrieved the last casualty, a rocket struck one of the armored vehicles supporting the operation, and he was wounded by shrapnel from the explosion. Disregarding his painful wounds, he rushed to aid his comrades, pulling them from the damaged vehicle to safety and treating their injuries. Private First Class Steffensen's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 3184 (July 4, 1968)

*STEIMEL, GREGG FRANCIS
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Gregg Francis Steimel (513-56-6634), Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company C, 2d Battalion, 12th Infantry, 25th Infantry Division. Specialist Four Steimel distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 31 July 1970 while serving as a machine gunner during combat operations in Tay Ninh Province. As Specialist Steimel's unit advanced through the thick jungle undergrowth, they were contacted by a large well entrenched enemy force firing automatic weapons and command detonated mines. The initial enemy onslaught wounded approximately forty per cent of the allied force and created temporary disorientation. Without hesitation, Specialist Steimel ran into the enemy fire spraying the hostile positions with intense machine gun fire. Although seriously wounded as he advanced, he remained in his forward position and continued his devastating fire to allow his comrades to evacuate the wounded allied soldiers. After the wounded had been evacuated to rear positions, the specialist again ran through the fire swept contact area to retrieve the weapons that the friendly casualties had left behind. As he performed this final action, he was fatally wounded by enemy fire. Specialist Four Steimel's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 4864 (October 16, 1970)
Home Town: Wright, Kansas

*STEINBERG, GEORGE CHARLES
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to George Charles Steinberg (0-5531785), First Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam. On 11 April 1966, First Lieutenant Steinberg, a member of Company C, 2d Battalion, 16th Infantry, 1st Infantry Division, was in command of the 4th Platoon on a search and destroy mission when at approximately 1700 hours a Viet Cong battalion attempted to encircle Company C. The 4th Platoon was ordered to breach the encirclement. The initial break-out met with an impenetrable barrage of machine gun, grenade, and mortar fire which killed the point man instantly, and severely wounded Lieutenant Steinberg in the arm. In the face of very intensive Viet Cong fire, Lieutenant Steinberg ran forward and reclaimed the soldier's weapon and equipment to prevent their falling into the hands of the insurgents. While doing this, he discovered the location of a Viet Cong machine gun. Alone and with complete disregard for his own safety, and defying the withering insurgent fire, he charged the machine gun position and placed accurate fire on the insurgents' position. He annihilated the crew and destroyed the weapon. Lieutenant Steinberg then returned to the perimeter, received hasty first aid for his shattered arm and began reorganizing the defense of his sector. Shortly thereafter, the 4th Platoon was struck by two fanatical Viet Cong assaults, increasing the casualties at an alarming rate. Nevertheless, Lieutenant Steinberg moved from position to position, readjusting his perimeter, encouraging his men, fighting savagely to beat back the waves of insurgents which closed in at point-blank range. Lieutenant Steinberg faced the insurgents with only twelve men, some of these already wounded. When it appeared that they were numerically outnumbered, Lieutenant Steinberg charged straight into the oncoming force, tossing riot control grenades into their midst. The Viet Cong trained their fire on him, striking him again and again. Before he fell, he had thrown six grenades which completely disrupted the Viet Cong's main effort to overwhelm the company. First Lieutenant Steinberg's extraordinary heroism, gallantry in action, and supreme sacrifice were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Pacific, General Orders No. 191 (August 18, 1966)
Home Town: Milwaukee, Wisconsin

*STEINER, MARK STEPHEN
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Mark Stephen Steiner (0-5433916), Second Lieutenant (Field Artillery), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company A, 2d Battalion, 60th Infantry, 9th Infantry Division. Second Lieutenant Steiner distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 24 November 1968 while serving as an artillery forward observer on a reconnaissance-in-force mission near Tan Tru, Long An Province. The point element of Lieutenant Steiner's platoon suddenly came under intense automatic weapons fire from a bunker hidden in a woodline, and several men were wounded by the initial volley. Realizing that artillery support might be needed, Lieutenant Steiner moved forward through the withering enemy barrage and discovered that two casualties and the medic who was treating them were completely unprotected. He immediately secured a grenade launcher and began applying suppressive fire while maneuvering towards the aggressors. Inspired by his courage, a machine gun crew joined him as he advanced to within a few feet of the hostile stronghold. Further exposing himself to the communists' fusillade, Lieutenant Steiner attempted to fire his pistol into the bunker and, when the weapon failed to fire, hurled a grenade into the structure's gun port which killed the enemy within. Fire then erupted from a previously undetected bunker located behind him, killing two men. Realizing that his comrades were in grave danger, Lieutenant Steiner turned and opened fire on the second emplacement to enable the others to reach cover. As he fearlessly engaged the enemy, he was mortally wounded by hostile fire. Second Lieutenant Steiner's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 713 (February 28, 1969)
Home Town: Ogden, Utah

STEINMAN, JACKIE W.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Jackie W. Steinman, Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company B, 2d Battalion, 60th Infantry, 9th Infantry Division. Specialist Four Steinman distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 14 May 1969 while serving as team leader during a reconnaissance-in-force operation near Thu Thua in Long An Province. As the members of his unit swept through a defense nipa palm grove, they ran on to a concealed bunker complex and were pinned down by hostile automatic weapons fire only ten meters from the enemy. Specialist Steinman assaulted a machine gun emplacement to his immediate front and eliminated it with hand grenades. Then, showering the fortifications around him with the last of his grenades, he secured the enemy machine gun and returned to his platoon's position. After obtaining more ammunition, he began maneuvering toward a member of his squad who lay isolated behind a hostile position. Slowly crawling to the rear of the nearest bunker, he destroyed the position with a grenade. At that moment he spotted a North Vietnamese soldier approaching the American. Specialist Steinman quickly fired his rifle killing the aggressor and laid an intense barrage of fire to cover his squad member's withdrawal. Noticing one last enemy bunker, Specialist Steinman worked his way to an advantageous position and opened fire. When his weapon jammed, he threw his remaining grenades. As he moved toward his platoon, he encountered a wounded American. Using the casualty's rifle, he provided suppressive fire until an ambulance helicopter arrived to evacuate the wounded soldier. Specialist Four Steinman's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 3594 (September 22, 1969)

STEPHENS, RUFUS
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Rufus Stephens (0-5321191), First Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam. On 17 February 1966, First Lieutenant Stephens was serving as Executive Officer, Company B, 2d Battalion, 5th Cavalry Division (Airmobile), 1st Cavalry Division. He was accompanying the 3d Platoon in screening the high ground to company B's flank. As the main force entered the Song Bien Valley, they were engaged by a Viet Cong force estimated to be a reinforced heavy weapons battalion which forced them to take defensive positions in three large bomb craters in the valley floor. The 3d Platoon in spite of being at a numerical disadvantage, launched an attack at the Viet Cong perimeter trying desperately to help the friendly defenders. As they came to within 100 meters of the company, they came under a heavy barrage of machine gun fire which seriously wounded the platoon leader. Lieutenant Stephens immediately took charge and began regrouping the platoon to prevent their positions from being overrun. Without regard for his own personal safety, he exposed himself to the continuous machine gun fire in order to direct the medical evacuation crafts to his location. After successfully evacuating the wounded, he returned to his platoon and readied his men for an attempt to join the besieged company. The first attempt was unsuccessful. The volume of fire was increasing all the time and caused Company B to lose contact with outside fire support. Noting the problem, Lieutenant Stephens again braved the hostile fire in order to get to a position from which he could better control the oncoming fire support for the friendly defenders. He was wounded in the arm but refused medical attention to that he could continue controlling fire support against the insurgent attackers. Realizing that one of the friendly aircraft was preparing for a bomb-run that would endanger the friendly positions, Lieutenant Stephens once again braved the barrage of insurgent fire and waved off the plane averting certain disaster for the friendly defenders. By increasing the rate of fire, a rifle company was able to air-assault into Lieutenant Stephens' position and by joining forces they were able to make contact with the besieged company. By directing close-in tactical air strikes at the insurgents, the attacks were stopped. Lieutenant Stephens' sustained performance during this period of actual combat was a source of inspiration to the men of the 3d Platoon. First Lieutenant Stephens' extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Pacific, General Orders No. 176 (July 29, 1966)

*STEVENS, FORESTAL ALONZO
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Forestal Alonzo Stevens (RA11667415), Specialist Fifth Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Detachment A-551, 5th Special Forces Group (Airborne), 1st Special Forces. Specialist Five Stevens distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 25 August 1968 as the platoon leader of a Mobile Strike Force company which was on a reinforcing mission at Camp Duc Lap. During an assault to drive elements of a North Vietnamese Army battalion from the hilltop camp, his unit came under heavy automatic weapons fire. Specialist Stevens moved to the front of his troops and led a fierce attack on the enemy positions, successfully overrunning them. Finding that a sister company was pinned down by fire from a North Vietnamese bunker, he next single-handedly assaulted the hostile emplacement and destroyed it and its occupants with grenades and rifle fire. Specialist Stevens continued to advance, directing his men's maneuver and helping remove the wounded from the battlefield while under a withering enemy fusillade. When his platoon reached the top of the hill it came under fire from another enemy bunker. Ordering his men to remain in position, Specialist Stevens fearlessly charged the fortification, killing two North Vietnamese inside it and wounding the third occupant. As he regrouped his unit for another assault, he was fatally wounded by enemy machine gun fire. Specialist Five Stevens' extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 4450 (September 23, 1968)
Home Town: Doylestown, Ohio

STEVENSON, ROBERT D.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Robert D. Stevenson (0-70515), Lieutenant Colonel (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Headquarters, 2d Battalion, 5th Cavalry, 1st Cavalry Division (Airmobile). Lieutenant Colonel Stevenson distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 11 March 1967 while commanding the 2d Battalion, 5th Cavalry during an engagement with a large enemy force near Phu Ninh. Throughout the afternoon of the battle, he dauntlessly exposed himself to intense ground fire to direct the action from his command and control helicopter. Even after the aircraft sustained several hits, Colonel Stevenson continued to fly at low altitude over the ravaged area to ensure mission accomplishment. When one of his company commanders was killed and the situation rapidly deteriorated, he disregarded the mounting dangers and landed amidst a hail of hostile fire. Colonel Stevenson fearlessly moved about the battlefield, and comforted the casualties and shouted encouragement to the troops. As darkness fell, he consolidated the company perimeter and directed the collection of dead and wounded at a central point. Throughout the night, he commanded the battalion from his forward position and called for supporting fires and illumination devices which enabled the medevac aircraft to extract the wounded. Only when a new company commander was brought in the following morning did Colonel Stevenson leave the battle area. His great presence of mind and courageous example during the entire engagement saved many lives and were an immeasurable inspiration to his men as they repulsed the insurgent attack. Lieutenant Colonel Stevenson's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 2791 (June 10, 1967)

STEWART, HARVEY E.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Harvey E. Stewart (0-79489), Major (Artillery), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam. After an attack which took place at approximately 0100 hours, 10 June 1965, the Vietnamese hamlet of Don Xoai was over-run by a Viet Cong force of approximately regimental size and a nearby military compound was being subjected to a heavy barrage of insurgent fire. At approximately 1215 hours, after several attempts to reinforce the besieged compound had failed, plans were initiated to evacuate the several Americans and Vietnamese who were holding the position. Major Stewart volunteered to lead three unarmed rescue helicopters and retrieve the besieged members from their embattled position. Armed helicopter escort was provided to assist Major Stewart's group in their rescue attempt. Upon reaching the battle site, all evacuation helicopters were subjected to a heavy volume of hostile fire and each received hits from the insurgent barrage. Realizing the fate of the gallant defenders, Major Stewart with complete disregard for his own personal safety, led the other aircraft and maneuvered his helicopter through the thick hail of hostile fire to a perfect landing next to the besieged group within the compound. While on the ground, despite intense hostile fire being directed at them, Major Stewart and his crews set up defensive firing positions and directed the loading of the evacuation aircraft. During the operation, one of the rescue helicopters received direct hits and was badly damaged and grounded. Major Stewart then expertly piloted his heavily overloaded and damaged craft once again through the heavy concentration of insurgent small arms and automatic weapons fire and notwithstanding the murderous barrage, successfully effected the safe evacuation of personnel from the besieged compound. Major Stewart's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Pacific, General Orders No. 311 (October 22, 1965)

*STEWART, SAMUEL R., III
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Samuel R. Stewart, III (0-5220757), Captain (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Advisory Team 70, 5th Infantry Division Advisory Detachment, United States Military Assistance Command, Vietnam. Captain Stewart distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 31 January 1968 as staff advisor to a Vietnamese regiment during an enemy attack on its headquarters compound at Ben Cat. During the early morning hours, a large Viet Cong force, armed with rockets, mortars, automatic weapons and flamethrowers, unleashed a furious assault on the installation and overran its perimeter bunker line. Captain Stewart went to the immediate defense of the communications bunker and raked the attackers with automatic rifle fire from its firing port. An enemy rocket exploded in the firing port and partially destroyed the position. The weapons of other personnel in the bunker were lost in the debris, but Captain Stewart, although seriously wounded by the blast, immediately began to fire again. When his rifle jammed, he fearlessly raced through a withering hail of hostile fire and acquired additional weapons from the advisory team's quarters. Returning to the position, Captain Stewart placed deadly fire on the insurgents at close range from a sandbag barrier behind the wrecked bunker. A Vietnamese woman and her four children approached his position, and he quickly guided them to safety and then continued firing. Braving an intense barrage of rockets and grenades directed at him, Captain Stewart fought fiercely from his exposed position, killing at least three assaulting Viet Cong and preventing many more enemy from entering the compound. He was rendered unconscious by a critical second wound while gallantly defending fellow soldiers and civilians against a determined enemy force. Captain Stewart's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 1568 (April 8, 1968)
Home Town: Miami, Florida

*STIGALL, ARTHUR DONALD
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Arthur Donald Stigall (0-69805), Lieutenant Colonel (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 1st Battalion, 26th Infantry, 1st Infantry Division. Lieutenant Colonel Stigall distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 7 November 1967 while leading two of his infantry companies on a search and destroy mission near Loc Ninh. Moving through an abandoned rubber plantation, his entire force was suddenly subjected to intensely savage claymore, small arms, and automatic weapons fire from a numerically superior Viet Cong force. Both companies sustained heavy casualties in the initial moments of the attack by the well-concealed enemy. Colonel Stigall positioned his command post between the two companies and established maximum control of the defensive actions of his troops. His position was then subjected to vicious Viet Cong fire and he was shot through the knee. Courageously ignoring his wound he initiated skillful, determined counter-fire against the enemy. When he received word that one of his company commanders had been wounded, he immediately assumed the direction of that company by radio. Enemy fire destroyed his radio and he repeatedly exposed himself to the ravaging hostile fire to direct his troops by voice as he searched for another radio. An exploding Viet Cong rocket knocked him to the ground. He again stood up in the deadly hail of fire, and when he saw a radio operator nearby, he ran toward his position, firing at the advancing enemy with his pistol until he received a mortal wound. His continual display of courage and determination was responsible for his men's coordinated and effective reaction to the insurgent attack and undoubtedly saved many of his comrades' lives. Lieutenant Colonel Stigall's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 6216 (December 2, 1967)
Home Town: Chase, Louisiana

*STOFLET, MICHAEL HOWARD
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Michael Howard Stoflet (55857498), Private First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company A, 5th Battalion, 7th Cavalry, 1st Cavalry Division. Private First Class Stoflet distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 1 November 1966, while his unit was being airlifted to reinforce a besieged American unit. As his platoon proceeded north from the landing zone to assist the friendly unit, it came under intense automatic weapons fire from several fortified Viet Cong bunkers. Private First Class Stoflet's squad continued to advance until it was pinned down approximately 75 meters short of the hostile positions. Realizing the perilous position his comrades were in, he dauntlessly began a one-man assault on the insurgent emplacement. Despite the murderous volume of fire directed at him, Private First Class Stoflet succeeded in safely reaching the bunker, and immediately found an opening through which he could get inside. His first attempt to secure the position was nearly fatal, as a burst of automatic weapons fire sent him reeling backwards with a slight head wound. Momentarily stunned, Private First Class Stoflet again disregard his safety to vault back into the small opening. In this courageous effort to overcome the enemy, he was mortally wounded. His unimpeachable valor in the face of overwhelming odds enabled the platoon to overrun the Viet Cong position and accomplish its mission. Private First Class Stoflet's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 676 (February 15, 1967)
Born: June 11, 1945 at Burlington, Wisconsin
Home Town: Elkhorn, Wisconsin

*STONE, BYRON CLARK
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Byron Clark Stone (0-91522), Captain (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with the United States Military Assistance Command, Vietnam. Captain Stone distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 20 August 1964 while serving as an advisor to the 41st Ranger Battalion, Army of the Republic of Vietnam, when the friendly forces were suddenly ambushed by hostile elements. Undaunted by the extremely heavy enemy gun fire, Captain Stone completely disregarded his own personal safety and bravely exposed himself to the full force of the violent enemy attack to cover the withdrawal of the friendly troops. During the ensuing battle in which the enemy launched several vicious assaults, he remained in an exposed position to defend the friendly units and repel the enemy. Although the intensity of the enemy gun fire increased, he demonstrated fortitude and perseverance by holding his position for 1 hour and 40 minutes while annihilating a great number of enemy troops. Despite the overwhelming onslaught, he covered the withdrawal of the friendly forces with outstanding effectiveness and continued his courageous efforts until mortally wounded. Captain Stone's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Department of the Army, General Orders No. 2 (February 5, 1965)
Home Town: Houston, Texas

*STONE, JAMES MARVIN
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to James Marvin Stone (0-5329842), First Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company C, 2d Battalion, 12th Cavalry, 1st Cavalry Division (Airmobile). First Lieutenant Stone distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 7 January 1968 as commanding officer of an airmobile infantry company on a search and destroy operation in the Que Son Valley. A sister unit had become heavily engaged in combat with a North Vietnamese Army battalion, and Lieutenant Stone led his men to reinforce the beleaguered troops. His company was savagely attacked with mortars and encircled by the enemy. He then directed maneuver elements of his unit to link up with an enveloped platoon of the second company while he led a furious assault against the numerically superior enemy. His slashing attack momentarily disorganized the hostile force and enabled the trapped platoon to move from its untenable position. As the enemy fusillade increased, Lieutenant Stone joined forces with the sister unit's main body, deploying his men in abandoned trenches and directed devastating return fire on the attackers. As the intensity of the fight increased, it became necessary for the friendly force to break out of the enemy encirclement or face possible annihilation. Fully exposing himself to a withering hostile barrage, Lieutenant Stone called suppressing artillery fire against North Vietnamese positions and supervised the preparation of the wounded for movement. Braving ravaging mortar and recoilless rifle fire, he then directed his troops' savage assault on the enemy lines. With bullets striking all around him, he led the fierce charge along a North Vietnamese trenchline and his men succeeded in breaking the encirclement. He was mortally wounded while fearlessly leading his company in close combat against a determined enemy force. First Lieutenant Stone's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 1838 (April 20, 1968)
Home Town: Miami, Florida

*STONE, RAYMOND EDWARD, JR.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Raymond Edward Stone, Jr. (0-5339673), Second Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company A, 2d Battalion, 14th Infantry, 1st Brigade, 25th Infantry Division. Second Lieutenant Stone distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 14 December 1967 while serving as platoon leader of an infantry company conducting a combat mission near Katum. His platoon suddenly received heavy automatic weapons, small arms, and recoilless rifle fire from an enemy force of unknown size in well fortified bunkers in a woodline. Lieutenant Stone immediately deployed his troops and led a fierce assault on the insurgents. Fifteen meters into the trees and undergrowth, his platoon encountered a thick wall of bamboo which concealed the hostile positions. Exposed to savage and relentless fire, he moved along the wall to an opening which was a firing lane and spotted two bunkers. Several of his men lay wounded in the exposed area, and Lieutenant Stone dashed through a hail of bullets to carry the casualties from the enemy killing zone to safety. Returning to the position with a recoilless rifle team, he threw hand grenades and placed a heavy volume of fire on the bunkers to draw the insurgents' fire until the recoilless rifle could engage the fortifications. The recoilless rifle received a direct hit from an enemy rocket round, and Lieutenant Stone and the gun crew were all wounded. He then called for more grenades to continue his gallant assault and enable the evacuation of the other casualties. Moving within ten meters of the hostile emplacements which had his troops pinned down, he destroyed the bunker with accurately thrown hand grenades. Just s he threw the last grenade, another enemy position began firing on him and he was instantly killed. His fearless and determined actions in close combat saved the lives of many fellow soldiers. Second Lieutenant Stone's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 699 (February 15, 1968)
Home Town: Reno, Nevada

STOWELL, ROBERT D.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Robert D. Stowell (OF-105042), First Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Troop E, 17th Cavalry, 173d Airborne Brigade (Separate). First Lieutenant Stowell distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 3 March 1967 while serving as patrol leader during a mission to capture a prisoner deep in War Zone C. When Lieutenant Stowell's unit triggered an attack on two insurgents using a heavily traveled Viet Cong trail, the enemy gathered in increasing numbers, trying to pin down the patrol and surround it. As the hostile presence grew to squad strength with several machine guns, Lieutenant Stowell radioed for gunship support and organized his men for a move to a landing zone. The patrol members were forced to fight their way to the helicopter pickup point. He fearlessly remained behind his men and single-handedly staved off the constant Viet Cong attacks from the area. When he grouped his men into a tight perimeter for the landing zone, the enemy force poured an awesome amount of fire onto them. Lieutenant Stowell appeared contemptuous of the danger, and moved about fearlessly guiding artillery and air strikes in ever-tightening circles around his position. When the evacuation helicopter came in, he again demonstrated his courage and concern for his men by remaining on the ground until all of his men were on board. Although Lieutenant Stowell received serious stomach and chest wounds early in the firefight, his men did not learn of them until they were flying out of the area. First Lieutenant Stowell's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 2321 (May 22, 1967)

*STREET, BRENT ANTHONY
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Brent Anthony Street (522-76-3300), Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company E, 2d Squadron, 8th Cavalry, 3d Brigade, 1st Cavalry Division (Airmobile). Specialist Four Street distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 1 April 1970 while defending Fire Support Base Illingsworth against an enemy attack in Tay Ninh Province. Following an intense barrage of hostile rocket and mortar fire, the enemy launched an aggressive ground assault on the allied base camp. Specialist Street immediately manned a fighting position located on a large berm and engaged the enemy with his rifle and hand grenades as they approached the base perimeter. As the battle raged on, the specialist's weapon malfunctioned and his supply of grenades was exhausted. Refusing to withdraw, the remained on station and continued to resist the enemy utilizing hand to hand combat. When a nearby ammunition storage area caught fire, Specialist Street again refused to withdraw to a more secure position. As he continued his determined fight against the onrushing enemy, an enemy mortar round exploded beside Specialist Street, and mortally wounded him. Specialist Street's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 4467 (September 21, 1970)
Home Town: Inglewood, California

STUART, RICHARD
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Richard Stuart (RA16993948), Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company A, 3d Battalion, 22d Infantry, 3d Brigade, 25th Infantry Division. Specialist Four Stuart distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 18 August 1968 as a perimeter sentry on top of Nui Ba Den Mountain. His unit came under a heavy mortar and rocket attack, followed by a ground assault. While fighting off a platoon which charged their bunker, Specialist Stuart and his companions held their position until they were wounded by enemy rockets. He immediately gave first aid to two of the men and then went to get a medic despite the fierce automatic weapons and small arms fire. Upon leaving his position he spotted an aggressor who was about to launch a rocket into the bunker, and killed him with a burst from his rifle. After returning with an aidman to his beleaguered position, he continued to engage the communists and was badly wounded in the hand during a subsequent enemy assault. Ignoring his painful injury, he remained at his station throughout the night until the hostile forces had been defeated. Specialist Stuart's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 466 (February 10, 1969)

*STURDIVANT, JASPER DEAN
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Jasper Dean Sturdivant (0-5326494), Second Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company B, 1st Battalion, 35th Infantry, 3d Brigade, 25th Infantry Division. Second Lieutenant Sturdivant distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 3 July 1966 while leading a two-squad patrol during a search and destroy near Thang Duc. When his unit received intense hostile fire from a reinforced Viet Cong company, Second Lieutenant Sturdivant and many of his men were seriously wounded. As the insurgent onslaught continued, a portion of his hasty defense was overrun and the remainder of his force was surrounded. Despite the severity of his wounds and repeated attacks by the fanatical Viet Cong, Second Lieutenant Sturdivant rallied his isolated force, radioed for reinforcements, and continued to direct and encourage his comrades. Realizing that his force was about to be overrun, Second Lieutenant Sturdivant, with complete disregard for his own safety, called artillery onto his own position in an effort to break the encirclement. He continued to operate the radio and fire his weapon until his ammunition was expended. Fully aware that he was critically wounded, Second Lieutenant Sturdivant disassembled his weapon, placed the bolt under his body, and died. Second Lieutenant Sturdivant's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 5894 (October 3, 1966)
Home Town: Lake View Terrace, California

*SWANN, JOHNNY DELBERT
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Johnnny Delbert Swann (255-70-3394), Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company B, 2d Battalion, 8th Cavalry, 1st Cavalry Division. Specialist Four Swann distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 5 September 1969 while serving as a team leader during a reconnaissance operation in Tay Ninh Province. His company was moving through thick jungle when it came under intense small arms and mortar barrages from a North Vietnamese force. In the initial contact several members of the point element were wounded, and the enemy immediately launched an assault against the weakened position. Realizing the enemy's tactical plan, Specialist Swann deployed his fire team on line to meet the assault and to form a defensive perimeter in front of the two isolated men. Specialist Swann began moving through the dense underbrush to their aid. With his team providing cover fire, he reached the wounded point man and carried him through the hostile fusillade to the safety of the friendly defensive position. After insuring his wounded comrade received medical treatment, Specialist Swann returned through the hail of enemy fire and thick foliage to the injured medic and began carrying him from the exposed area. As Specialist Swann reached the defensive line of his team, he was fatally wounded by a burst of enemy fire. Specialist Four Swann's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 4391 (December 6, 1969)
Home Town: Atlanta, Georgia

SWEET, RICHARD SEARCY
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Richard Searcy Sweet (0-64671), Lieutenant Colonel (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving as Commanding Officer of the 2d Battalion, 12th Cavalry Regiment, 3d Brigade, 1st Cavalry Division. Lieutenant Colonel Sweet distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions during the period 3 to 5 February 1968 as a battalion commander defending the city of Hue. Colonel Sweet was on the ground with his front line troops when the enemy launched an attack on the city. Positioning himself far forward, he disregarded the intense North Vietnamese mortar and sniper fire and expertly directed his forces in an advance toward Hue. His brilliant leadership enabled all four of his companies to successfully cross a wide open rice paddy into the city while under a constant enemy fusillade. He then led his battalion through the first line of enemy resistance, and by nightfall had succeeded in establishing a tight defensive perimeter. Under a steady hail of mortar and heavy automatic weapons fire from three sides, the battalion fiercely fought to retain its position. Early in the morning of 4 February the perimeter came under an extremely heavy bombardment and shortly thereafter began receiving ground attacks by large numbers of North Vietnamese soldiers. The battalion was soon encircled by a North Vietnamese regiment, and heavy enemy fire rained on the defenders from all directions. Colonel Sweet skillfully directed the perimeter defense, personally encouraging his troops' fight. Following their commander's example, the officers and men of the battalion fought savagely to repulse the enemy. After dark, Colonel Sweet devised a plan to deceive the surrounding North Vietnamese forces and move through their positions to a new location deeper in their lines of communication. The entire battalion slipped through the enemy's encirclement without suffering one casualty. Again Colonel Sweet's example provided the inspiration for his troops and by daybreak they had successfully occupied commanding terrain deep inside the enemy's area of operations. Lieutenant Colonel Sweet's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 4158 (August 28, 1968)
Born: May 17, 1929 at Providence, Rhode Island
Home Town: Providence, Rhode Island

*SWOVELAND, WILLIAM ALAN
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to William Alan Swoveland (RA16804215), Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving as Scout Section Leader with the 2d Platoon, Troop C, 1st Squadron, 1st Cavalry, Americal Division, on 25 August 1968 near Tam Ky, Republic of Vietnam. Sergeant Swoveland's Troop was heavily engaged with an estimated North Vietnamese Army Battalion. The Infantry unit working with his troop was pinned down due to intense fire. Sergeant Swoveland noticed that several infantrymen were wounded and lying helplessly in the open. Reacting instinctively, Sergeant Swoveland leaped from his armored carrier assault vehicle, and charged through the enemy fusillade to a point within 20 meters of the enemy positions to give the exposed litter patients aid, and carry them under intense fire, to safety. Observing several more wounded comrades in exposed positions, Sergeant Swoveland returned to the forefront to brave the intense small arms, automatic weapons, and recoilless fire and reach his wounded comrades. Sergeant Swoveland was fatally wounded during this selfless act of courage and devotion to his fellow soldiers. His extraordinary heroism at the cost of his life saved the lives of two wounded soldiers, and inspired his comrades to eventually annihilate the numerically superior force. His actions are in the highest traditions of the United States Army and reflects great credit upon himself, and the Armed Forces.
Department of the Army, General Orders No. 36 (June 6, 1969)
Home Town: Detroit, Michigan

SYDNOR, ELLIOT P., JR.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Elliot P. Sydnor, Jr., Lieutenant Colonel (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary gallantry in action on 21 November 1970. Colonel Sydnor volunteered to command an all-volunteer raiding force organized to conduct a heliborne assault in an heroic attempt to rescue United States personnel being held as prisoners of war at the Son Tay prison in North Vietnam. Colonel Sydnor displayed outstanding leadership and personal courage as he personally directed the assault on the compound and the withdrawal of the entire raiding force. Colonel Sydnor's masterful command and control of the operation under the most hazardous combat conditions was exemplary. His keen mind and alertness to the constantly changing situation enabled him to effectively direct and control the actions of the joint assault force air and ground elements and maneuver them as the situation required. In order to maintain the critical control required over the complex raid operation, Colonel Sydnor unhesitatingly and fearlessly exposed himself time and time again to the enemy's small arms and automatic weapons fire. When the withdrawal began, Colonel Sydnor, with utter disregard for his personal safety, constantly stood fully exposed in the helicopter landing zone in order to direct the withdrawal and insure that not one man was unwittingly left behind. The success of the mission was directly attributed to his dynamic and fearless leadership and to the heroic example he set for his officers and men. The degree of his valorous action was further accentuated by his prior knowledge of the location of the prison compound--eighteen kilometers from the capital city of North Vietnam. Knowing full well the enemy forces were armed with automatic weapons and the target area saturated with enemy installations, high performance aircraft, and antiaircraft defenses; Colonel Sydnor's premeditated personal risk, extraordinary heroism against an armed hostile force, and extreme devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit on him and the United States Army.
Department of the Army, General Orders No. 43 (August 9, 1971)
Home Town: Fernandia Beach, Florida

SYKES, LARRY W.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Larry W. Sykes, Private First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Battery A, 8th Battalion, 6th Artillery, 1st Infantry Division. Private First Class Sykes distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 12 May 1969 while serving as a cannoneer during the defense of Fire Support Base Gela. In the early morning hours the fire base came under a fierce rocket and ground attack. When his emplacement sustained several direct hits which destroyed his howitzer, Private Sykes braved flying shrapnel to aid a fellow soldier downed by hostile fragmentation. Seeing that the enemy had now launched a ground assault on the perimeter, he ran from gun parapet to parapet gathering machine guns and ammunition. He dashed to the perimeter under heavy fire and distributed several of the weapons to waiting infantrymen. He himself took up a position where the hostile fire was heaviest. For nearly three hours Private Sykes directed friendly fire and steadfastly resisted enemy attempts to penetrate his sector of the perimeter. Though suffering painful burns to his hand when replacing the barrel of his machine gun, he remained at his weapon and shortly afterward cut down six enemy soldiers in the wire directly to his front. When he had exhausted his supply of ammunition, he again exposed himself to the hail of fire to obtain a grenade launcher which he skillfully employed against further enemy probes. Private First Class Sykes' extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 3416 (September 7, 1969)

SZYIBACK, CLARENCE
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Clarence Szyiback, Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company B, 3d Battalion, 22d Infantry, 25th Infantry Division. Specialist Four Szyiback distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 6 June 1969 while serving as a radio- telephone operator at Fire Support Base Crook in Tay Ninh Province. When the base came under intense rocket and mortar attack, Specialist Szyiback secured his radio and followed the company commander to the defensive perimeter to observe and report enemy movements. Exposing himself to the rain of enemy fire, he assisted in resupplying ammunition to troops in the bunkers. When the enemy blew gaps in the wire defenses and attempted to breach the perimeter, he helped organize and lead a reaction force which beat back the hostile surge. After the battle subsided, he moved with the command group through the combat area to inspect enemy casualties and equipment. As the group searched the area, a wounded enemy soldier threw an anti- tank grenade at the company commander. Specialist Szyiback unhesitatingly moved in front of the officer, deflected the armed weapons, and then picked it up and threw it. The grenade exploded s it left his hand, inflicting severe wounds on him. Specialist Four Szyiback's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 3421 (1969)

 

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