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Full Text Citations For Award of

The Distinguished Service Cross
 U.S. Army Recipients  - Vietnam 
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W

To All Who Shall See These Presents Greeting:

This is to Certify that
The President of the United States of America
Takes Pride in Presenting


THE 
DISTINGUISHED SERVICE CROSS
to

*WAGNER, GREY H.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Grey H. Wagner (RA55799688), Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam. Sergeant Wagner distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 10 January 1968 while serving as a squad leader of the 2d Platoon, Company B, 1st Battalion, 27th Infantry, 2d Brigade, 25th Infantry Division. On this date his unit's forward base camp came under heavy attack from an unknown size enemy force. Sergeant Wagner was commanding a machine gun position which stood in the center of the insurgents' main line of advance and became the focal point of hostile rocket and automatic weapons fire. During the enemy's first assault, the positions on both sides of Sergeant Wagner were overrun. He held fast and rallied his men to lay down a heavy barrage of fire which momentarily halted the attack and enabled the other squads of his platoon to move into a secondary defensive perimeter. He then directed the troops with him to withdraw to a new position while he provided covering fire for their movement. Although painfully wounded during the first enemy assault, he courageously remained at his post in the face of a second devastating charge, firing into the attackers' ranks until he was mortally wounded. His heroic actions contributed greatly to the eventual defeat of a fanatical enemy force. Sergeant Wagner's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 2850 (June 13, 1969)
Home Town: Hampton, Iowa

WAGNER, LOUIS C.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Louis C. Wagner, Lieutenant Colonel (Armor), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Advisory Team 4, United States Military Assistance Command, Vietnam. Lieutenant Colonel Wagner distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions during the period 29 April to 2 May 1972 while serving as Senior Advisor, 1st Armor Brigade, Army of the Republic of Vietnam. The 1st Armor Brigade was ordered to protect Quang Tri City, at all cost, against three North Vietnamese Divisions supported by two regiments of tanks. As the enemy overwhelmed and shattered the brigade, Colonel Wagner's calm and exemplary gallantry and courage became a rallying symbol to the demoralized soldiers. Disregarding his own personal safety, Colonel Wagner maintained his position at the point of severest contact and was injured when his command personnel carrier was forced to cross a bridge destroyed by enemy artillery. Refusing aid, he assisted in evacuation of his counterpart who had been wounded. When the brigade was given the mission of breaking the North Vietnamese stranglehold on the supply route to the defenders of Quang Tri, Colonel Wagner, his injury still untreated, exposed himself continuously to enemy machine gun and antitank rocket fire while directing air strikes. As the brigade's position became less tenable and the North Vietnamese forces encircled it, Colonel Wagner's daring courage and calm leadership became the guiding force that enabled the South Vietnamese to extricate themselves without crippling losses. Although knowing that large elements of four North Vietnamese Divisions would isolate his position, Colonel Wagner elected to remain with his counterpart and attempt a breakthrough. As they received devastating enemy artillery and a two-sided enemy tank attack, Lieutenant Colonel Wagner led the brigade in a penetration of the enemy encirclement to friendly lines. Lieutenant Colonel Wagner's calm and fearless leadership was singularly responsible for preventing the 1st Armor Brigade's complete decimation and saved the lives of many of his South Vietnamese comrades. Lieutenant Colonel Wagner's conspicuous gallantry and extraordinary actions are in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 2333 (October 3, 1972)
Home Town: Fairfax, Virginia

WAITE, RAYMOND F.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Raymond F. Waite, Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Troop D, 229th Assault Helicopter Battalion, 3d Brigade, 1st Cavalry Division. Sergeant Waite distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 8 April 1972 while serving as gunner for a Light Observation Helicopter, involved in rescue operations of besieged friendly forces near An Loc, Republic of Vietnam. The small friendly element was surrounded by a battalion-size enemy force augmented with anti-aircraft weapons that claimed one man's life the day before. As the helicopter in which he was flying approached the friendly element, American gunships began putting suppressive fire onto the enemy machine-gun and anti-aircraft positions. Despite the firepower massed against them, the enemy continued to direct intensive fire at the rescue ship. Upon reaching the friendly position, Sergeant Waite dismounted the aircraft to assist a wounded American advisor aboard, even though the enemy was directing intensive machine-gun fire at their position. After returning to the aircraft, he provided the only secure grasp to keep another American advisor, who was precariously hanging outside the aircraft, from falling to his death during the arduous low-level flight to a safe area following the extraction. Even though it took numerous hits, his aircraft carried 3 American advisors and 4 ARVN personnel to safety. Sergeant Waite's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, MACV Support Command General Orders No. 1674 (July 29, 1972)

*WALDEN, DARRELL EDWARD
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Darrell Edward Walden (US56588319), Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company A, 2d Battalion, 12th Infantry, 25th Infantry Division. Sergeant Walden distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 7 April 1969 as squad leader on a reconnaissance-in-force mission near Tam Dinh. While sweeping through a section of rice paddies, his company encountered a heavily booby-trapped area. Although his squad successfully eliminated several of the dangerous devices, Sergeant Walden fell victim to a rigged hand grenade. As his men rushed to his aid, he suddenly detected the presence of a booby-trapped mortar round. Realizing that the insidious booby trap would destroy the majority of his squad, he saved the lives of his men at the sacrifice of his own by throwing himself on the mortar shell at the moment it exploded. Sergeant Walden's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 2021 (June 9, 1969)
Home Town: Girard, Illinois

WALDEN, JERRY T.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Jerry T. Walden, First Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company D, 3d Battalion, 187th Infantry, 101st Airborne Division (Airmobile). First Lieutenant Walden distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 18 May 1969 while serving as a platoon leader during a company assault on Dong Ap Bia Mountain near the A Shau Valley. During the initial moments of the assault, the company's commanding officer was critically wounded. Lieutenant Walden assumed command and continued the assault on the mountain. During the ensuing battle, Lieutenant Walden's company took control of the mountain top, but in the process they suffered fifty per cent casualties including Lieutenant Walden who was wounded in the leg by shrapnel. Still under intense fire from enemy bunkers located near the top of the mountain, Lieutenant Walden took several hand grenades and assaulted the enemy positions. After knocking out four bunkers, he was seriously wounded by an enemy grenade thrown from another bunker. Undaunted by his wounds, Lieutenant Walden assessed his company's dwindling ammunition supply and their exposed position and ordered a withdrawal. As he was pulling back with the last squad, the radio operator was seriously wounded in the arm by sniper fire. Lieutenant Walden crawled down the remainder of the hill and pulled the wounded radio operator to cover. Realizing that he was the company's only remaining officer, he refused evacuation until a replacement arrived. Lieutenant Walden's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 1942 (June 21, 1970)

WALDRON, ADELBERT F.
(First Award)
Synopsis:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Adelbert F. Waldron, Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company B, 3d Battalion, 60th Infantry, 9th Infantry Division. Sergeant Waldron distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions during the period 16 January 1969 to 4 February 1969. His extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 1068 (1969)
Other Award: Distinguished Service Cross w/OLC (Vietnam)
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WALDRON, ADELBERT F.
(Second Award)
Synopsis:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting a Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster in lieu of a Second Award of the Distinguished Service Cross to Adelbert F. Waldron, Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company B, 3d Battalion, 60th Infantry, 9th Infantry Division. Sergeant Waldron distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions during the period 5 February 1969 to 29 March 1969. His extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 2904 (1969)
Other Award: Distinguished Service Cross (Vietnam)
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WALDROP, ANDREW H., JR.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Andrew H. Waldrop, Jr., Sergeant First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Advisory Team 87, U.S. Advisory Group, United States Military Assistance Command, Vietnam. Sergeant First Class Waldrop distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 18 November 1969 while serving as advisor to a Vietnamese artillery battery. That afternoon, he and three other advisors were driving two jeeps to Phan Thief in order to obtain supplies for their battery. As the soldiers rounded a sharp curve on Highway QL1 in their jeeps, they encountered approximately thirty North Vietnamese soldiers moving in columns along both sides of the road. Sergeant Waldrop, who was riding shotgun in the lead jeep, began firing immediately on the enemy troops with his canister- loaded M-79 grenade launcher. Noticing that two of the enemy were closing in on the second jeep and preparing to fire on it, Sergeant Waldrop spun round in his vehicle as it passed the two soldiers and killed both of them with one well placed round with his weapon. By now the surprised enemy troops had taken up defensive positions on both sides of the road and were retaliating on the moving jeeps with automatic weapons fire. Although hit by enemy fire in the lower abdomen and right side, Sergeant Waldrop continued firing on the enemy troops with devastating accuracy. As the two vehicles sped through the middle of the enemy positions, the driver of Sergeant Waldrop's jeep was critically wounded by enemy fire. Sergeant Waldrop quickly put down his weapon and took control of the jeep, holding the wounded driver in with one hand and driving the speeding jeep out of the kill zone with the other hand. Sergeant First Class Waldrop's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 546 (February 26, 1970)

WALKABOUT, BILLY B.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Billy B. Walkabout, Sergeant [then Specialist Fourth Class], U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company F, 58th Infantry, 101st Airborne Division (Airmobile). Sergeant Walkabout distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 20 November 1968 during a long range reconnaissance patrol southwest of Hue. After successfully ambushing an enemy squad on a jungle trail, the friendly patrol radioed for immediate helicopter extraction. When the extraction helicopters arrived and the lead man began moving toward the pick-up zone, he was seriously wounded by hostile automatic weapons fire. Sergeant Walkabout quickly rose to his feet and delivered steady suppressive fire on the attackers while other team members pulled the wounded man back to their ranks. Sergeant Walkabout then administered first aid to the solider in preparation for medical evacuation. As the man was being loaded onto the evacuation helicopter, enemy elements again attacked the team. Maneuvering under heavy fire, Sergeant Walkabout positioned himself where the enemy were concentrating their assault and placed continuous rifle fire on the adversary. A command-detonated mine ripped through the friendly team, instantly killing three men and wounding all the others. Although stunned and wounded by the blast, Sergeant Walkabout rushed from man to man administering first aid, bandaging one soldier's severe chest wound and reviving another soldier by heart massage. He then coordinated gunship and tactical air strikes on the enemy's positions. When evacuation helicopters arrived again, he worked single-handedly under fire to board his disabled comrades. Only when the casualties had been evacuated and friendly reinforcements had arrived, did he allow himself to be extracted. Sergeant Walkabout's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 3945 (1969)

WALKER, DENNIS K.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Dennis K. Walker, Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism on 10 May 1970 while serving as a rifleman with Company D, 6th Battalion, 31st Infantry, 3d Brigade, 9th Infantry Division, in the Republic of Vietnam. On this date Sergeant Walker's company was involved in a reconnaissance mission, when suddenly the company was engaged and pinned down by heavy enemy mortar, rocket, and small arms fire. Sergeant Walker's element and the command element were pinned down and isolated from the main body of the company. With complete disregard for his own safety, Sergeant Walker repeatedly exposed himself to intense enemy fire as he assaulted enemy bunkers on five different occasions. During the battle, Sergeant Walker hurled grenades and directed fire at the bunker apertures. Although wounded in one of his assaults, his pace never slowed as he took charge of his element, directing their fire into the enemy positions. Seeing that the enemy was set back by his assaults, Sergeant Walker organized a landing zone for evacuation helicopters to evacuate wounded personnel. When the enemy rallied and placed intensive fire on the helicopters, he again assaulted the bunker complex exhausting his ammunition into their positions. He then returned to his position and rallied his men, leading them to the company's main body. Sergeant Walker's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Department of the Army, General Orders No. 5 (February 25, 1971)

WALKER, FRANK J.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Frank J. Walker (RA17346715), Staff Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company B, 299th Engineer Battalion, 937th Engineer Group, 18th Engineer Brigade. Staff Sergeant Walker distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 11 November 1967 while serving with an engineer platoon on a bridge repair mission in Kontum Province. Sergeant Walker's convoy was moving along the highway toward the damaged bridge when a large Viet Cong force released a savage ambush which destroyed his vehicle. With complete disregard for his personal safety, he leaped from the wrecked truck into a hail of bullets and charged an enemy machine gun which was placing devastating fire on his men. Unleashing a fierce rifle fire and grenade barrage on the attackers, he succeeded in silencing the gun and enabled part of the convoy to move out of the killing zone. When the machine gun began firing again, he fearlessly charged the position and silenced the gunners once more with hand grenades. This action enabled a fellow sergeant to direct the remaining vehicles to safety. Continually risking his life in the face of brutal enemy fire, he returned alone to his damaged vehicle to re-supply himself with ammunition. Once again, machine gun fire struck all around him. Despite exploding grenades and the ravaging barrage, he personally assaulted the hostile position for the third time and permanently destroyed it with intense fire. His gallant actions in the face of overwhelming odds were responsible for saving numerous lives and disrupting the force of the Viet Cong attack. Staff Sergeant Walker's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 181 (January 15, 1968)

WALKER, ROBERT H.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Robert H. Walker (0-5346696), First Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with company E, 2d Battalion, 39th Infantry, 1st Brigade, 9th Infantry Division. First Lieutenant Walker distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous action on 17 March 1969 while second in command of a volunteer night raiding team operating in Dinh Tuong Province. Upon landing, the twelve-man team was pinned down by hostile machine gun fire which immediately killed the team leader and the radio-telephone operator. Assuming command, Lieutenant Walker led the men away from the grazing fire to safety. Then, as the element approached the target, a known Viet Cong assembly area, a hail of enemy bullets burst from twin bunker fortifications. While his men fired upon the enemy, Lieutenant Walker crawled forward and destroyed the emplacements with two hand grenades. Once routed, the insurgents, combined with enemy reinforcements, managed to surround the team. A fierce battle ensued, during which the command-and-control helicopter arrived and established a link with the imperiled team. With aid from gun ships, half the team succeeded in breaking free from the encircled enemy and laid suppressive fire while the remainder of the team escaped to join them. The consolidated element quickly formed a circular defensive perimeter. Seeing at this time that the Viet Cong were about to claim the remains of the two soldiers killed in the initial attack, Lieutenant Walker directed his men to drive the enemy away while he crawled outside the perimeter to save both bodies, as well as their equipment. After he returned to the perimeter, the raiding team valiantly repulsed a final assault by two enemy squads. Lieutenant Walker personally stopped three assailants who charged within hand grenade range. When the team moved out to rendezvous with the extraction helicopter, he volunteered to act as the rear security guard. Several times his marksmanship foiled attempts to cut the team off. While finally being evacuated, he continued to engage the enemy with deadly accuracy as the helicopter lifted to safety. First Lieutenant Walker's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 2023 (June 9, 1969)

WALKER, WESLEY F.
Synopsis:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Wesley F. Walker, First Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam on 11 July 1972. First Lieutenant Walker's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Department of the Army, General Orders No. 47 (October 2, 1974)
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*WALKER, WILLIAM WAYMAN
Synopsis:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to William Wayman Walker (258524875), Captain (Infantry), U.S. Army (Reserve), for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Detachment B-33, Company A, 5th Special Forces (Airborne), 1st Special Forces. Captain Walker distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 8 August 1970. His extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 4465 (September 21, 1970)
Home Town: Jacksonville, Florida
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WALL, LEE O.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Lee O. Wall (US54667235), Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company B, 2d Battalion, 2d Infantry (Mechanized), 1st Infantry Division. Sergeant Wall distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 13 October 1968 as a squad leader at a night defensive position occupied by two platoons in the village of Tam Binh. When the camp came under heavy mortar, rocket-propelled grenade and recoilless rifle fire, Sergeant Wall exposed himself to the fusillade to make sure the men of his platoon wee under cover and prepared for a ground attack, and then returned to his armored personnel carrier to direct a barrage at the enemy positions. His track was struck by rocket-propelled grenade and recoilless rifle fire, seriously wounding the machine gunner and causing Sergeant Wall to lose his hearing from the concussion for the remainder of the night. Sergeant Wall and a medic carried the wounded gunner over one hundred meters through the hostile small arms and mortar fire to the aid station. Although Sergeant Wall was wounded in the knee and knocked to the ground by an exploding mortar, he again braved the fusillade to find three more casualties and bring them to the aid station. While he was moving toward an armored personnel carrier which was receiving intense enemy fire, two communists broke through the defensive wire and attempted to mount the besieged track. Sergeant Wall killed them with a burst of machine gun fire and, firing all of his ammunition and throwing grenades, drove back the aggressors who were charging through the break in the wire. After checking his troops' positions, he manned a bunker and directed devastating fire until the enemy began to withdraw. He then organized litter parties and assisted in loading the wounded onto the ambulance helicopters. Sergeant Wall's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 897 (March 14, 1969)

*WALLER, CASEY OWEN
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Casey Owen Waller (226-72-9734), Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company E, 2d Battalion, 8th Cavalry, 3d Brigade, 1st Cavalry (Airmobile). Specialist Four Waller distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 1 April 1970 while Fire Support Base Illingsworth against an enemy attack in Tay Ninh Province. Following an intense barrage of hostile rocket and mortar fire, the enemy launched an aggressive ground assault on the allied base camp. Specialist Waller immediately left the relative security of his bunker to engage the enemy with his rifle and hand grenades as they approached the base camp perimeter. As the battle raged on, the specialist's weapons malfunctioned and his supply of grenades was exhausted. Refusing to withdraw, he remained on station and continued to resist the enemy utilizing hand-to-hand combat. When a nearby artillery ammunition storage area caught fire, Specialist Waller again refused to withdraw to a more secure position. As he continued his determined fight against the onrushing enemy, the nearby ammunition exploded and mortally wounded him. Specialist Four Waller's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 4335 (September 15, 1970)
Home Town: Cumberland, Virginia

WALLIN, DENNIS G.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Dennis G. Wallin, Captain (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force during the period 23 April to 26 April 1972, while serving as Deputy Senior Advisor to the 9th Airborne Battalion, Airborne Division, Army of the Republic of Vietnam. On 23 April the North Vietnamese Army launched a vicious attack with tanks and infantry supported by artillery and rockets. The momentum of their attack collapsed the Tan Canh defenses resulting in the capture of the vital road networks south and east of Tan Canh. This action forced the 9th Airborne Battalion to withdraw, leaving the 92d Company surrounded by enemy forces in the rugged mountainous area northwest of Tan Canh, Dak To Province. The 92d Company was under heavy small arms fire from all sides in addition to constant artillery and mortar fires. Beyond the range of friendly artillery fires, Captain Wallin immediately requested aerial rocket artillery gun ships to suppress enemy fires. Captain Wallin then dashed through intense fires to reach a position to observe and guide the fires of the gun ships. As the gun ships poured rockets and machine gun fire on the enemy position, Captain Wallin again exposed himself to the murderous fire to gain dominant observation of other portions of the perimeter. Frequently Captain Wallin's exposed positions were spattered with shrapnel and dirt as he called for aerial rocket artillery fires within twenty-five meters of the perimeter. Many times during the three-day ordeal, Captain Wallin was credited by the Vietnamese soldiers with decimating the ranks of enemy soldiers with gun ship fires, thus enabling the unit to move to new locations. During these moves, Captain Wallin remained with the point elements to adjust air strikes and gun ships supporting the withdrawal. In addition to his brilliant use of helicopter gun ships and tactical air support, Captain Wallin was a constant source of strength to his counterpart in planning their attacks, moves, defense, and infiltration through enemy territory to safety. The successful extraction of the South Vietnamese force, with all of its wounded and most of its equipment, must be largely credited to Captain Wallin's professional and continued use of air assets, his decisive and forceful leadership, personal courage and determination to survive. Captain Wallin's extraordinary heroism, devotion to duty and conspicuous gallantry under fire are in keeping with the finest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon him and the United States Army.
Department of the Army, General Orders No. 6 (March 19, 1976)
Born: at Lebanon, Oregon
Home Town: Gaston, Oregon

*WALSH, DAVID WILLIAM
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to David William Walsh (064-34-7124), Captain (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in action in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company A, 1st Battalion, 20th Infantry, 11th Infantry Brigade, Americal Division. Captain Walsh distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 10 June 1969 while serving as the commander of combat operations near the village of Phuoc Loc in Quang Ngai Province. He was directing his company into a blocking position when a North Vietnamese force armed with machine guns, grenades, and small arms attacked and pinned down the unit. Captain Walsh immediately organized a reaction force to engage the flanking ambush positions. As his small element began to close in, automatic rifle fire burst from a concealed emplacement. Captain Walsh single-handedly charged the position killing the enemy soldier and capturing his weapon. As he led his group forward, he encountered hostile fire and quickly shot the enemy soldier. When a third sniper opened fire on the group, Captain Walsh once more rushed forward to eliminate the hostile trooper. While engaging the third sniper he was mortally wounded by enemy fire. Captain Walsh's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 3238 (August 18, 1969)
Home Town: Colton, California

WANAT, GEORGE K., JR.
Synopsis:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to George K. Wanat, Jr., Captain (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Advisory Team 47, United States Military Assistance Command, Vietnam. Captain Wanat distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions during the period 5 to 8 April 1972. His extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Department of the Army, General Orders No. 2 (February 3, 1976)
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WANDKE, RICHARD D.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Richard D. Wandke, Captain (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company C, 1st Battalion, 12th Infantry, 4th Infantry Division. Captain Wandke distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 27 May 1969 while commanding his company on a search and destroy mission southwest of Landing Zone Mary Lou. When one of the rifle squads surprised seven enemy soldiers and opened fire, Captain Wandke immediately deployed the remainder of the unit to assist. Hostile reinforcements meanwhile had arrived in huge numbers and began to place tremendous firepower on the company's perimeter. Despite the devastating artillery fire directed on the enemy positions, Captain Wandke's unit sustained heavy casualties. As soon as Captain Wandke rallied his men to force the enemy to break off their assault temporarily, he directed every man who was able to withdraw from the area to establish a landing zone for evacuating the wounded. Although wounded himself, Captain Wandke alone stayed behind to protect the dead and critically wounded. For three harrowing hours he directed artillery fire on hostile emplacements and with his individual weapon prevented the enemy from overrunning his position. Captain Wandke's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 4316 (December 1, 1969)

*WARD, TOM
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Tom Ward (15256644), Sergeant First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving an opposing force in the Republic of Vietnam on 20 August 1964. Sergeant Ward was serving as a Light Weapons Infantry Advisor to a Ranger Battalion of the armed forces of the Republic of Vietnam when the friendly units were suddenly ambushed by hostile elements. Undaunted by the extremely heavy gunfire, Sergeant Ward completely disregarded his own personal safety by assuming an exposed position to repel the enemy. When the enemy launched several vicious assaults during a violent battle that lasted one hour and forty minutes, he remained in his exposed position and succeeded in annihilating a great number of enemy troops. Instead of taking cover after sustaining a severe wound, he voluntarily proceeded to the location of the Battalion Advisor to support the defense operation. Then, when the intense enemy gunfire was concentrated on this position, he unhesitatingly placed himself in a dangerous position to assist the Battalion Advisor in the operation of a machinegun that allowed the remaining Rangers to withdraw. Despite the overwhelming onslaught, he covered the withdrawal of the friendly troops with outstanding effectiveness and continued his courageous efforts until he succumbed to mortal wounds. Sergeant Ward's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the military service.
Department of the Army, General Orders No. 8 (March 9, 1965)
Home Town: Cincinnati, Ohio

WARD, WILLIAM H.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to William H. Ward, Sergeant First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Mobile Advisory Team 62, Delta Military Assistance Command, United States Military Assistance Command, Vietnam. Sergeant First Class Ward distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 19 August 1969 while serving as a medical advisor at Cai Doi Outpost in Kien Tuong Province during an attack by an estimated three-company enemy force. At the onset of the attack, the enemy 107-millimeter rocket hit the team house where Sergeant Ward and other members of the advisory team were sleeping. The rocket killed one member and seriously wounded the other four occupants. Sergeant Ward was seriously wounded, but upon regaining consciousness, he dragged one of his unconscious comrades away from the burning team house where grenades, flares and other ammunition were exploding. Refusing first aid for himself, Sergeant Ward immediately began to administer first aid to the other wounded team members. Realizing that he could no longer work in his present condition, he allowed his burnt hands and numerous other wounds to be bandaged. After receiving first aid, Sergeant Ward exposed himself to intense enemy fire while climbing the outpost's watch tower. From this vantage point he called in and coordinated friendly mortar, artillery and gunship fire and requested evacuation boats for the wounded. Upon their arrival, he again exposed himself to intense enemy fire in order to direct and assist the movement of the men to the boats. Refusing to have his own wounds examined, Sergeant Ward insisted that all efforts be directed to his comrades. He aided and directed frantic efforts to save the life of the senior advisor through the use of heart massage and resuscitation. Sergeant First Class Ward's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit on himself, his unit and the U.S. Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 1588 (June 3, 1970)

*WARE, KEITH LINCOLN
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Keith Lincoln Ware (0-33181), Major General, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 1st Infantry Division. Major General Ware distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 12 and 13 September 1968 as the Commanding General of the 1st Infantry Division during an operation in the vicinity of Loc Ninh. Elements of the division became heavily engaged with a reinforced North Vietnamese regiment. Although he knew the enemy was utilizing anti-aircraft weapons in the area, General Ware repeatedly directed his helicopter commander to fly at a minimum altitude so he could more effectively direct and coordinate his infantry units' fierce fight. On numerous occasions his ship received fire from the communists' anti-aircraft emplacements, but General Ware continued his low level flights, which gave him maximum control of his troops and the best observation of the North Vietnamese deployment. He was killed when the enemy fusillade directed at his craft hit the ship, causing it to crash and burn. General Ware's personal courage and leadership inspired his beleaguered men to ultimately gain a total victory over the aggressors. Major General Ware's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 4958 (October 25, 1968)
Born: November 23, 1915 at Denver, Colorado
Home Town: Glendale, California
Other Award: Medal of Honor (WWII)

WARREN, THOMAS E.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Thomas E. Warren, Sergeant First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company A, 3d Battalion, 187th Infantry, 101st Airborne Division (Airmobile). Sergeant First Class Warren distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 5 and 6 September 1968 while participating in a reconnaissance-in-force mission against the village of Ap Trang Dau near Trang Bang. Intelligence reports had indicated that the village was a haven for two battalions of North Vietnamese regulars. Having overcome fierce sniper resistance as they encircled the town, the friendly force settled into defensive positions to wait out the night. In the early morning hours of 6 September, the enemy initiated a crazed attempt to break from the allied snare while darkness hung over the village. Supported by a curtain of mortar and rocket-propelled grenade fire, the hostile troops rushed from the village in screaming waves. Sergeant Warren was coordinating defensive fire when he noticed that several of his men holding a position some seventy-five meters on the left flank were outnumbered and in danger of being overrun. He started moving toward the isolated soldiers through massive barrages of enemy fire. Although suffering fragmentation wounds in his advance, he began hurling grenades and firing his weapon in an effort to draw the enemy's fire on himself as his men maneuvered back to the main force. When they had safely arrived he again harrowed the full force of hostile firepower in a wild dash back across the bullet-raked battlefield, sustaining additional wounds in the maneuver. Sergeant Warren then regrouped his troops and redistributed ammunition, encouraging his weary comrades as he moved among them. When the beaten enemy broke contact and fled, he administered first aid to the injured and personally took charge of the helicopter extraction of the dead and seriously wounded. Weak and nearly exhausted, he stood in the open rice paddy, harassed by sniper fire, and guided in evacuation helicopters with a strobe light. Sergeant First Class Warren's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 3904 (1969)

WASCO, JOSEPH, JR.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Joseph Wasco, Jr. (0-470134), Lieutenant Colonel (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 2d Battalion (Airborne), 327th Infantry, 1st Brigade, 101st Airborne Division. Lieutenant Colonel Wasco distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions from 19 to 22 June 1966 while serving as a commanding officer during a search and destroy mission near Trung Luong. Throughout the four-day battle, Lieutenant Colonel Wasco repeatedly exposed himself to intense hostile fire both in the air and on the ground when he moved by helicopter to the most critical sectors of the battle area. During one night he remained with his most heavily engaged company and, despite intense mortar and automatic weapons fire, visited each of the positions within the perimeter, directed the defense and exerted a steadying influence on his young troopers. He also participated in a daytime counterattack against heavily fortified positions. Later, during a large ground assault, Lieutenant Colonel Wasco directed his pilot to fly low over the engagement so that he could clearly observe the course of the battle. During these low level observation flights his craft was often the target of concentrated fire. Later, he again spent the night in the most critical sector of the battle, directed the defense and encouraged his men. His presence at the critical sectors on the field of battle inspired the members of his command to repulse the most savage assaults by the Viet Cong. Lieutenant Colonel Wasco's extraordinary bravery and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 6797 (December 13, 1966)

WASHINGTON, JOHNNY LEE
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Johnny Lee Washington, Staff Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in Vietnam during the period 7 - 11 November 1967. Staff Sergeant Washington was then a platoon sergeant with Company D, 3d Battalion, 8th Infantry Regiment, 4th Infantry Division. On these dates, the entire Battalion was engaged in fierce fighting with large forces of North Vietnamese Army Regulars in the rugged Central highlands of Vietnam near the city of Dak To. There were many casualties and the men at the bunkers were in great need of a resupply of ammunition. During the fighting, with enemy mortars, rockets, and small arms fire raging in the area, Sergeant Washington left his position and continually guided the helicopters that were bringing the necessary resupply of ammunition. He helped unload the choppers and proceeded to carry the ammunition to the bunker line. Still under heavy enemy pressure, Sergeant Washington passed out ammunition, fired on the enemy and on return trips pulled the wounded from their positions back to the landing zone for treatment and subsequent evacuation. Due to Sergeant Washington's efforts, the critically wounded were promptly evacuated and countless lives were saved. His unselfish and tireless work during an eight hour period that went well into the next day inspired others to leave their positions and assist him. On the afternoon of 11 November, Company D had just arrived on Hill 724 when it came under a heavy barrage of hostile small arms and mortar fire. Sergeant Washington, as Acting Platoon Leader, showed outstanding leadership by organizing and directing the defensive and offensive positions of the 3d Platoon. On that same evening while the Company was under a constant and heavy attack of enemy fire, he led a squad of men to reinforce Company E's perimeter, and by skillfully maneuvering his men till they were at the weakest position of the perimeter was able to repel the enemy attack with a rapid and sustained volley of small arms fire. Sergeant Washington's extraordinary heroism is in the highest traditions of the United States Army and reflects great credit upon him and the United States Army.
Department of the Army, General Orders No. 2 (February 3, 1976)
Home Town: Salinas, California

WATTS, ALBERT R.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Albert R. Watts (RA19304157), Platoon Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company D, 2d Battalion, 12th Cavalry, 1st Cavalry Division. Platoon Sergeant Watts distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 23 September 1966 while serving with elements of the 12th Cavalry assaulting an entrenched Viet Cong force near Bong Son. During the initial moments of the engagement, Sergeant Watts' company sustained several casualties, who lay exposed a few meters in front of three hostile bunkers. Repeated attempts to reach the wounded men had failed, as the well fortified emplacements remained impervious, even to heliborne cannon strikes. Undaunted, Sergeant Watts maneuvered his platoon through devastating automatic weapons and machine gun fire, moving among his men, shouting encouragement and directing the attack. Realizing that his wounded comrades would soon die without medical aid, he ordered one squad to assault from the side while he charged the center bunker alone. Unmindful of the dangers and armed only with two hand grenades, Sergeant Watts ran across forty meters of bullet-swept terrain directly into the insurgent fire. Throwing both grenades through the firing ports, he silenced the position, killing all four Viet Cong inside. With the main hostile threat eliminated, the flanking team quickly overcame the second emplacement, but the platoon leader was wounded as the unit advanced on the last insurgent bunker. Assuming command, Sergeant Watts courageously led the final assault and safely reached the wounded men. His unimpeachable valor and selfless concern for others ensured the success of the mission and saved the lives of several fellow soldiers. Platoon Sergeant Watts' extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 1090 (March 14, 1967)

*WAYCASTER, RICHARD LEE
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Richard Lee Waycaster (US53527713), Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company A, 2d Battalion, 8th Cavalry, 1st Cavalry Division. Specialist Four Waycaster distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 19 February 1969 as a machine gunner during a search and clear mission near Landing Zone Saint Barbara in Tay Ninh Province. While the point element of his company was crossing an open field, it came under heavy fire from concealed positions and several members were seriously wounded. Specialist Waycaster immediately advanced through the bullet-swept area, firing his machine gun as he went. Reaching an unprotected sector, he laid down an effective barrage which silenced the enemy automatic weapons positions. After taking his machine gun to another point from which he could cover several of his comrades who were evacuating the casualties, he was wounded by hostile automatic weapons fire, but he continued to provide suppressive fire until the wounded had been brought to safety. As he started to withdraw to his company's defensive perimeter, he spotted a wounded comrade who had not been seen by the others and moved to assist him. When he had reached the fallen trooper the enemy unleashed a heavy volume of fire at the two men. Specialist Waycaster covered the man's body with his own and was morally wounded. Specialist Four Waycaster's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 1533 (April 30, 1969)
Home Town: Horse Shoe, North Carolina

*WAYMIRE, JACKIE L.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Jackie L. Waymire (15688393), Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company B, 5th Special Forces Group (Airborne), 1st Special Forces. Sergeant Waymire distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 9 January 1967 while advising a Vietnamese Mike force on a combat reconnaissance patrol. After successfully destroying a hostile village complex, the unit was returning to its base camp. As the lead element entered the perimeter, the entire camp came under fierce automatic weapons fire from a reinforced Viet Cong platoon. Sergeant Waymire dauntlessly exposed himself to the savage barrage and maneuvered his platoon into two defensive positions. However, the intense hail of hostile fire threatened to inflict heavy casualties on the besieged camp if aggressive action was not immediately taken. Without hesitation, Sergeant Waymire called for covering fire as he led an assault against the insurgent flank. Shouting encouragement and orders, he stormed up the hill ahead of his men. Completely disregarding his safety, Sergeant Waymire charged a Viet Cong automatic weapons emplacement and killed three insurgents before being fatally wounded. With the last effort of his strength, he continued to encourage his men as he vainly struggled forward himself. His unimpeachable valor saved many lives and contributed immeasurably to the defeat of the Viet Cong force. Sergeant Waymire's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 377 (January 26, 1967)
Home Town: Huntington, West Virginia

WEBB, FRANCIS R.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Francis R. Webb (RA16994487), Staff Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company C, 1st Battalion, 26th Infantry, 1st Infantry Division. Staff Sergeant Webb distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 1 February 1969 as a platoon sergeant on a company-size reconnaissance-in-force mission approximately seven miles west of Ben Cat. Approaching the vicinity of an enemy base camp, his company received intense rocket-propelled grenade, automatic weapons and small arms fire from three sides. Sergeant Webb obtained a machine gun and laid covering fire as the unit withdrew to regroup. Returning to his platoon, he organized a flanking movement against a bunker and spiderhole complex. He valiantly led a group forward against a bunker, but heavy hostile fire wounded one man and forced the others back. Sergeant Webb again remained exposed to the enemy barrage to provide covering fire. While maneuvering to the main body of the company, his assistant gunner was seriously wounded. Sergeant Webb unhesitatingly dropped his machine gun and crawled one hundred meters through the enemy fusillade with his stricken comrade. When he reached his platoon, he found that the platoon leader was incapacitated by wounds. Taking command, Sergeant Webb deployed his men, crawling among them to give encouragement and directions. As night approached, he took volunteers to secure two casualties and the machine gun. They reached the machine gun, which was then used against the bunkers. As they moved to their fallen comrades, Sergeant Webb destroyed a bunker with two light anti-tank weapons and eliminated the spider holes with fragmentation grenades, thereby permitting his men to retrieve the casualties to safety. Staff Sergeant Webb's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 2213 (June 24, 1969)

WEEDMARK, JAMES A.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to James A. Weedmark (RA19858329), Specialist Fifth Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Troop D, 3d Squadron, 5th Cavalry, 9th Infantry Division. Specialist Five Weedmark distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 19 June 1967 as a helicopter repairman with the 9th Infantry Division. Upon receiving an urgent request to help evacuate over one hundred casualties from a heated battle, Specialist Weedmark's aircraft proceeded to the site of the conflict and made a landing amid machine gun cross fire. Bullets immediately riddled the helicopter, wounding the aircraft commander as some of the casualties were placed aboard. Specialist Weedmark climbed atop the aircraft to assess the damage, and after he had determined that the aircraft was operative, the wounded were flown to a hospital. The helicopter returned for another load. As additional patients were being placed aboard, Specialist Weedmark was wounded in the thigh. Observing another rescue helicopter crash nearby, he ignored the painful injury, ran across fifty meters of open rice paddy laced with fierce enemy fire, and pulled the survivors from the wreckage. As he carried a wounded man to a protected position he was shot a second time. His own helicopter had been too badly damaged by the intense barrage to take off, and he proceeded to remove the casualties aboard to a place of safety. Specialist Weedmark continued to move between the two downed ships, disregarding his safety to secure radio equipment, weapons and ammunition. Using a machine gun, he then placed a furious volume of fire on the enemy. Wounded a third time, Specialist Weedmark finally fell unconscious from loss of blood and the tremendous strain of his exertions. Specialist Five Weedmark's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 3251 (July 10, 1968)

WELCH, ALBERT C.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Albert C. Welch, First Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in action against the enemy on 17 October 1967, near Chon Thanh, Binh Long Province, Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company D, 2d Battalion, 28th Infantry, 1st Infantry Division. First Lieutenant Welch's company was moving behind Company A, 2d Battalion, 28th Infantry into an enemy base camp. After two hours of cautious movement, Company A was devastated by withering enemy small arms, grenade and machine gun fire, killing Company A's platoon leaders and seriously wounding the company commander. First Lieutenant Welch rapidly directed a perimeter defense around the Command Group and raced forward to ensure that his forward elements were tied in with Company A's rear elements. As he approached through heavy enemy fire he received a wound to the chest but succeeded in bringing several wounded soldiers from Company A back into his company's perimeter. He ran to his men to encourage and direct their fire. Ignoring sniper fire from the trees, he cannibalized damaged radios to call for artillery fire, close to and on to his position, while carefully avoiding the area where the dead and wounded were lying. Seeing an enemy rocket propelled grenade being launched against the Command Group, he raced forward through both enemy and friendly fire and killed the enemy soldier, receiving a serious wound to his left arm. With his sidearm, he killed another enemy soldier who had penetrated the company's perimeter. Exhausted, he slumped to the ground. His first sergeant called to him that enemy soldiers were executing American wounded. He again rose to his feet, raced forward, and killed two more enemy soldiers, then fell unconscious but still alive from five battle wounds and loss of blood. First Lieutenant Welch's heroism, care for his men, personal fighting skills and leadership epitomized the actions of an infantry leader in close combat against an overwhelming enemy force. First Lieutenant Welch's actions reflect great credit upon himself, the 1st Infantry Division, the United States Army, and the United States of America.
Headquarters, Department of the Army, General Orders 9, 18 November 2005

*WELLMAN, KENYON GARY
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Kenyon Gary Wellman (US54441015), Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company D, 3d Battalion, 22d Infantry, 3d Brigade, 25th Infantry Division. Specialist Four Wellman distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 22 December 1967 while serving as a member of a combat patrol on a search and destroy mission near Dau Tieng. His patrol was maneuvering through dense jungle when it was savagely ambushed by a Viet Cong force in well-fortified positions. Specialist Wellman was pinned down at the front of his unit by intense enemy automatic weapons fire, and many of his nearby comrades were killed or wounded. Despite bullets striking all around him, he ignored his own safety, moved among the wounded, and administered first aid. The lethal hostile fire continued relentlessly, and Specialist Wellman realized that in order to save his patrol from annihilation, the Viet Cong bunker directly to his front would have to be silenced. He crawled to where a machine gunner had been killed, grabbed the machine gun and single-handedly assaulted the enemy position. He charged through the underbrush laying down a concentrated barrage on the insurgent fortification. His one-man attack was momentarily halted when he was struck to the ground by a burst of enemy fire. Very seriously wounded but knowing the lives of his fellow soldiers depended on the destruction of the Viet Cong bunker, he stood up and continued his gallant assault through a curtain of fire. When only a few feet from the enemy position, he was hit again by a hail of bullets and instantly killed. Specialist Four Wellman's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 772 (February 20, 1968)
Home Town: Richardson, Texas

WESSEL, LEON MACK, JR.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Leon Mack Wessel, Jr. (0-5429361), First Lieutenant (Artillery), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in action in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Headquarters and Headquarters Battery, 2d Battalion, 320th Artillery, 1st Brigade, 101st Airborne Division. First Lieutenant Wessel distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 15 May 1967 while serving as artillery forward observer for an airborne infantry battalion on a search and destroy mission near Duc Pho. His platoon was savagely attacked by an estimated North Vietnamese battalion firing automatic weapons, mortars and grenades from well-fortified positions. He immediately called for artillery strikes on the enemy positions to allow the platoon leader to withdraw to a more secure position. The platoon leader was seriously wounded, but Lieutenant Wessel quickly assumed command and called for intensified strikes on the hostile onslaught. Ignoring his own safety, he moved through the withering enemy barrage to rally his men and call for air support. Time after time he exposed himself to the enemy weapons to direct helicopter strafing runs on the hostile fortifications. He repeatedly moved into the open during the five-hour firefight to inspire his men to fight furiously against the numerically superior North Vietnamese unit. He was ordered to withdraw in the face of the intense attack and unhesitantly braved the savage fire to secure a landing zone in the bullet-swept jungle and direct rescue ships to his position. Heedless of the intense fire, he moved to within fifty meters of the hostile lines and directed artillery strikes to cover the extraction operation. He remained on the ground until he was sure that all of his men were loaded. First Lieutenant Wessel's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 5789 (November 10, 1967)

WEST, HUGH M.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Hugh M. West, Specialist Fifth Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Troop B, 3d Squadron, 4th Cavalry, 25th Infantry Division. Specialist Five West distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 9 June 1970 while serving as a senior radio mechanic with a seven-vehicle re-supply convoy in Cambodia. As the convoy proceeded to their destination just inside the Cambodian border, they were forced to delay their mission by torrential rains and poor terrain. Soon after the convoy established a defensive position, they were attacked by a large enemy force firing rockets, mortars, and small arms. Specialist West reacted immediately to the hostile fire by placing effective counter fire on the surrounding enemy positions. Although wounded by an incoming mortar round, he continued to fire at the attacking enemy while encouraging his companions to sustain the defensive efforts. Then, hearing cries for help from a wounded comrade lying in an exposed position, Specialist West ran to the casualty and carried him to the center of the allied defensive position where, amid a hail of enemy sniper fire, he applied first aid to his wounds. After treating the casualty, he returned to his fighting position where he continued to resist the enemy in a determined manner. When he was notified that a rescue helicopter was en route to evacuate seriously wounded allied personnel, the specialist moved to the evacuation site and stood alone in an exposed position to direct the aircraft to the landing zone. Although the first attempt was aborted by the intense enemy fire, Specialist West again stood in his exposed position to direct the helicopter safely down. After the wounded were loaded aboard, the specialist returned to his position to help his weary comrades resist a final enemy attack. Specialist Five West's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 5029 (November 7, 1970)

WEST, THOMAS E.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Thomas E. West, Specialist Fifth Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in action while serving with the 1st Cavalry Division engaged in operations against overwhelming enemy forces near a fire support base center in the Kingdom of Cambodia on 2 May 1970. When approaching a downed pilot who had parachuted from his crippled aircraft, Specialist West's aircraft came under intense enemy antiaircraft, automatic weapons and rocket fire. Noticing that the pilot was suspended from a tree and that the vegetation was too dense to land, Specialist West unselfishly volunteered to rescue the injured individual. Despite the strafing enemy fire, Specialist West descended the rope, crossed a clearing and attempted to free the pilot from his harness. Unable to free the pilot, he returned 50 meters to the helicopter in order to obtain a knife. Again, and with great courage and daring Specialist West returned through the hostile fire to the stranded pilot. Cutting the pilot loose, Specialist West then dragged him, despite closely impacting rounds, to the survival rope hanging from the aircraft. Because of severe rope burns Specialist West was unable to climb the rope. He wrapped his body around the pilot to protect him. Still using his body to protect the pilot and hanging from the rope 70 feet below the aircraft, Specialist West was flown through 1,500 meters of enemy fire to an open field where the aircraft landed and the injured pilot was put aboard. His extraordinary heroism was in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflected great credit on him, his unit, and the United States Army.
Department of the Army, General Orders No. 31 (July 1, 1971)

WESTFALL, RONALD K.
Synopsis:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Ronald K. Westfall, Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 1st Battalion, 14th Infantry, 25th Infantry Division. Specialist Four Westfall distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 19 November 1966. His extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 115 (1967)
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WETZEL, ALLAN R.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Allan R. Wetzel (0-94010), Captain (Armor), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 2d Battalion, 14th Infantry, 1st Brigade, 25th Infantry Division. Captain Wetzel distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 16 February 1968 as commanding officer of an infantry unit conducting a mission in the city of Tay Ninh. His company, reinforced by an attached platoon approached a wall near the temple grounds, it suddenly encountered an intense volume of automatic weapons, grenade and rocket fire from a battalion-sized enemy force. Captain Wetzel quickly deployed his men and directed their suppressive fire on the insurgents. He then crawled to the lead element's position and found that it had sustained heavy casualties. It was also in danger of being subjected to a flank attack. Captain Wetzel returned to the main element and led a spoiling attack to the temple wall to prevent the enemy form dividing his company and isolating its elements. His men were driven back by heavy automatic weapons fire and he regrouped them for another assault. As he did so, he observed an enemy soldier preparing to fire a rocket at an American armored personnel carrier. Unable to warn the vehicle's crew from his position, he dashed through the intense hostile fire to the carrier and arrived at the vehicle at the same moment it was struck by the enemy round. Despite the wounds he sustained from the exploding rocket, he immediately evacuated the vehicle's crew members to a position of safety. At the same time, the insurgent forces assaulted his company's position. Moving to a holding position along the wall to his rear, Captain Wetzel and six of his men completely halted the enemy's attack with a deadly barrage of grenade and rifle fire. After reinforcements had arrived, he personally directed the extraction of the wounded. Captain Wetzel's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 3654 (July 30, 1968)

WEYAND, FREDERICK C.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Frederick C. Weyand (0-33736), Major General, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Headquarters, 25th Infantry Division. Major General Weyand distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 9 January and 3 February 1967 while serving as Commanding General, 25th Infantry Division. On 8 January, one of his companies became pinned down by intense Viet Cong fire. The unit had lost all radio contact and by nightfall was completely surrounded. Unmindful of the dangers, General Weyand accompanied the first helicopter into the besieged company early the next morning. He quickly organized the evacuation of the dead and wounded, and dauntlessly walked around the treacherous perimeter, comforting the casualties and encouraging the beleaguered defenders. His personal presence on the battlefield was a source of boundless inspiration and enabled his men to hold out until relief arrived. On 3 February, while flying over War Zone C, his pilot monitored a radio transmission stating that two vehicles and ten men were lost in hostile territory. The interrogation patrol had accidentally strayed into the Viet Cong infested terrain and all attempts to reach them by radio had failed. Realizing the urgency of the situation, General Weyand began a meticulous search of the area until he spotted the two vehicles heading deeper into hostile territory. Despite the threat of mines and numerous insurgents in the area, he ordered his pilot to land the aircraft. With complete disregard for his safety, General Weyand then jumped from the helicopter, flagged down the errant patrol and turned it around. As the vehicles headed back, he called for covering artillery fire and had his command ship fly low level escort until the patrol reached friendly lines. His singular courage and aggressive determination during both situations were responsible for saving the endangered lives of his men. Major General Weyand's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 804 (February 24, 1967)

*WHALEN, MICHAEL CORNELIUS
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Michael Cornelius Whalen (US21328280), Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company B, 4th Battalion, 3d Infantry, Americal Division. Specialist Four Whalen distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 28 February 1969 as a medic during a search and clear operation near the village of Minh Khanh in Quang Ngai Province. His company came under intense hand grenade, small arms and automatic weapons attack, wounding several men. Hearing a cry for a medic and for more ammunition, he courageously left his position of relative safety with the desperately needed ammunition and crossed approximately two hundred meters of open terrain to reach the besieged element. As he exposed himself to the enemy fusillade to assist the casualties, he was wounded in the leg, but he disregarded his painful injury and continued to help the other casualties until he was fatally wounded by enemy fire. Specialist Four Whalen's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 1558 (May 2, 1969)
Home Town: Lee, Massachusetts

WHITAKER, IRA E.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Ira E. Whitaker (RA18428508), First Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam while serving with Battery C, 8th Battalion, 6th Artillery, 1st Infantry Division Artillery, 1st Infantry Division. First Sergeant Whittaker distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 1 November 1968 during a night mortar, rocket and ground attack by a North Vietnamese sapper battalion against Fire Support Base Rita. Although wounded by flying shrapnel, Sergeant Whitaker fearlessly went to his battery's section of the perimeter and placed intense rifle fire on the communists who had broken through the base's defenses. He was wounded again when one of the howitzers was hit by a rocket-propelled grenade, but continued to fight the aggressors and engaged two sapper positions simultaneously. Moments after he had obtained additional ammunition from the body of a fallen comrade, he saw a sapper attempting to affix satchel charges to the hull of a howitzer. Sergeant Whitaker emptied his magazine into the communist and ran to the howitzer to drag him away from the gun before he could arm the satchel charges. A comrade was then killed by another sapper, and Sergeant Whitaker continued to expose himself to the hostile fusillade to suppress the sapper's fire. After re- establishing several defensive bunker positions, he manned a machine gun mounted on one of the howitzers until the attack was repelled. First Sergeant Whitaker's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 1107 (1969)

WHITE, GERALD J.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Gerald J. White (0-2316240), Captain (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving as Commanding Officer, Company D, 3d Battalion, 22d Infantry, 3d Brigade, 25th Infantry Division. Captain White distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 12 April 1968 while serving as Commanding Officer of an infantry company during a reconnaissance-in-force operation. A combined Viet Cong/North Vietnamese force launched a mortar attack on his battalion's night defensive perimeter, and followed it with a massive ground assault. Captain White exposed himself to the murderous enemy fire to organize the defender's efforts and treat the wounded. Spotting a group of attackers who had breached the perimeter, he killed them single-handedly. When several of the battalion's positions reported that they were running out of ammunition, he resupplied them personally, again encountering and killing several enemy troops. He discovered the communists had gained control of one location on the perimeter, and he attacked and recaptured it, successfully defending it until reinforcements arrived. As he returned to his command post, he saw some wounded men in an area raked by enemy machine gun fire. Crawling through the fusillade, he extracted them. Throughout the fight, he continued to leave his bunker to rescue casualties and encourage the defenders. He also directed flare ships and gun ships until the Viet Cong/North Vietnamese force was repulsed. Captain White's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 5027 (1968)

WHITEHEAD, JOHN B., III
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to John B. Whitehead, III, Captain (Armor), U.S. Army, for gallant conduct while pilot of a light observation helicopter near An Loc, Republic of Vietnam on 8 April 1972. During rescue operations of a besieged friendly force, a friendly relief column was moving from An Loc to Loc Ninh to relieve the defenders of Loc Ninh. The relief column came under heavy enemy attack about four miles north of An Loc and an element of South Vietnamese soldiers along with three American advisors were completely cut off and surrounded. Three attempts were made by helicopter to rescue the surrounded element, but all were repulsed by heavy antiaircraft fire. On 8 April 1972 another rescue attempt was made with Captain Whitehead as the pilot of one of the rescue aircraft. After numerous airstrikes on the enemy positions surrounding the friendly element, Captain Whitehead's aircraft proceeded towards the friendly location, his aircraft began to receive intensive enemy small arms fire. Through his own courage and determination to save American lives, Captain Whitehead landed in the midst of the surrounded element under this intensive fire. With his aircraft designed to carry only four personnel, Captain Whitehead and his crew chief picked up the three American advisors and four South Vietnamese soldiers, who held on to the skids of the aircraft. With the aircraft in this dangerously overloaded situation Captain Whitehead was barely able to take off and was unable to gain any altitude. He had to fly low over known enemy locations receiving enemy fire until they reached safety. Captain Whitehead knowingly flew into an area surrounded by hostile forces to save American lives at the risk of his own. Captain Whitehead's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Department of the Army, General Orders No. 18 (May 29, 1973)
Home Town: Columbus, Georgia

WHITEHEAD, RUDOLPH L.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Rudolph L. Whitehead (0-5329853), First Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company A, 2d Battalion, 22d Infantry, 3d Brigade, 25th Infantry Division. First Lieutenant Whitehead distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 15 July 1967 while serving as platoon leader of a mechanized infantry platoon on a road securing mission between Dau Tieng and Tay Ninh. Shortly after midnight, his unit was savagely hit by an intense mortar barrage followed by a heavy ground attack with enemy forces firing rockets, recoilless rifles, machine guns and rifle grenades. After two of his armored personnel carriers were destroyed in the fierce assault, Lieutenant Whitehead ordered the remaining vehicles to lay down intense fire and cover the movement of his men to defensive positions. He saw the machine gunner on one of his personnel carriers receive a serious wound and immediately dashed into the open and carried the man to safety. With a hail of bullets striking around him, he climbed into the machine gun cupola himself and directed heavy fire on the fanatical insurgents. Shrapnel from a rocket round knocked him from the vehicle, but he ignored his wounds and climbed back to continue his accurate fire. Rocket and recoilless rifle rounds simultaneously struck his position, seriously wounding him and destroying his gun. Realizing the true-strength and determination of the attackers, he ordered his men to withdraw to a more defensible location. Completely disregarding his own safety, he moved among his men under a curtain of fire and rallied them to repel repeated enemy assaults until reinforcing units arrived. First Lieutenant Whitehead's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 6349 (December 10, 1967)

WHITTED, JACK G.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Jack G. Whitted (0-64583), Lieutenant Colonel (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving as Commanding Officer of the 1st Battalion, 28th Infantry, 1st Infantry Division. Lieutenant Colonel Whitted distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 8 November 1966 while commanding his battalion on a search and destroy mission. Although no Viet Cong activity was reported in his vicinity, Colonel Whitted personally reconnoitered and directed the construction of their defensive night position. He required his men to carry double basic loads of ammunition and thoroughly ringed the camp with mines and trip flares, realizing the possibility of encountering hard core Viet Cong units. Though listening outposts indicated no unusual activity throughout the night, Colonel Whitted called in his observes at sunrise and began to fire mortars in a reconnaissance-by-fire maneuver. Viet Cong forces creeping toward a camp during the night, thought they had been discovered and were forced to begin their attack prematurely. With the hostile positions revealed to him, Colonel Whitted directed an artillery counterattack. Although completely exposed to the increasing fire falling around him, he refused to leave the knoll which gave him a view of the battle area. When a dangerous situation developed in one sector, he personally directed an air strike to his own positions. Although wounded, Colonel Whitted continued, with complete disregard for his personal safety, to man his command post. His thorough and constant briefing of officers and confident direction of the battle resulted in a decisive victory. A very large cache of supplies and ammunitions was confiscated and over 400 Viet Cong were killed, while friendly casualties were light. Lieutenant Colonel Whitted's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 7018 (1966)

WICKWARD, WILLIAM J.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to William J. Wickward (RA51245438), Sergeant First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 1st Battalion, 14th Infantry, 3d Brigade, 25th Infantry Division. Platoon Sergeant Wickward distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 19 November 1966 while serving as platoon sergeant of a reconnaissance platoon on a combat mission deep in hostile territory. While leading his platoon toward a known enemy bunker complex, Sergeant Wickward was notified that a unit on his flank was heavily engaged by a large Viet Cong force. He quickly maneuvered to support the engaged platoon, but his unit came under heavy attack from a well entrenched enemy force. Pinned down by deadly sniper fire which inflicted numerous casualties on the platoon, he exposed himself time after time to return the fire, personally killing seven insurgents. After deploying his men in a perimeter, he moved through the withering fire to reach the wounded outside the perimeter. Completely ignoring his own safety, he moved four casualties to safety under a barrage of automatic weapons and machine gun fire. He continued to expose himself to redistribute ammunition and direct the fires of his men despite the mounting intensity of the attack. When the insurgents were finally defeated, he led his men to reinforce the other platoon and led both to safety. Platoon Sergeant Wickward's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 5114 (October 5, 1967)

*WIDEMAN, ELVIN JOSEPH
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Elvin Joseph Wideman (RA17584012), Staff Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company A, 5th Battalion (Airmobile), 7th Cavalry, 1st Cavalry Division (Airmobile). Staff Sergeant Wideman distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 19 November 1966 while serving as a squad leader with elements of the 7th Cavalry on a search and destroy mission near Bong Son. When the lead element became heavily engaged with a Viet Cong force, his platoon moved forward to provide fire support. As the unit maneuvered into position it was suddenly pinned down by intense automatic weapons fire from several fortified bunkers to their immediate front. Pinpointing the insurgent positions, Sergeant Wideman directed three of his men to cover him as he dauntlessly crawled forward alone. When he arrived at a point near one bunker, he threw a grenade into it and destroyed the emplacement. With complete disregard for his safety, Sergeant Wideman then ran through the fierce hostile barrage to another emplacement where he killed all the Viet Cong with his rifle. Unmindful of the inherent dangers, Sergeant Wideman courageously advanced toward another bunker a few meters away. As he raised up to toss a grenade, he was mortally wounded by machine gun fire. With the last effort of his strength, he flung the grenade into the emplacement, killing all the insurgents inside. His conspicuous gallantry saved many of his comrades from death or injury and contributed immeasurably to the defeat of the Viet Cong force. Staff Sergeant Wideman's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 354 (January 25, 1967)
Home Town: St. Louis, Missouri

WIJAS, RODNEY J.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Rodney J. Wijas, Staff Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Advisory Team 60, United States Military Assistance Command, Vietnam. Staff Sergeant Wijas distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 5 July 1966 as an American Advisor to the 9th Infantry Division, Army of the Republic of Vietnam. He was accompanying the lead company on a heliborne assault. Immediately after the helicopters of the leading elements had landed, the landing zone was swept by enemy machine gun and small arms fire from concealed positions, approximately 30 meters away. The lead helicopter was disabled immediately, and the wounded crew members were left exposed to the enemy fire. Sergeant Wijas, realizing that the only hope of survival for the more seriously wounded was immediate first aid, moved forward in full view of the enemy. While under continual aimed fire from automatic weapons, he succeeded in recovering several of the more desperately wounded men and saved their lives by administering emergency first aid. Attempts to reinforce the company by air were called off because the heavy volume of enemy fire made it impossible for more helicopters to land. Realizing the gravity of the situation, Sergeant Wijas again moved forward, under fire, to consolidate the friendly unit positions. Determining that the present positions were untenable, Sergeant Wijas advised the Ranger Company Commander to relocate the unit near a small canal which afforded some protection. Sergeant Wijas, for the third time, moved forward under enemy fire and insured that all wounded personnel had been evacuated to the new position. Rejoining the company, Sergeant Wijas began to advise on the best methods to launch an assault in conjunction with an armored cavalry unit element which had maneuvered to the left flank. Based on Sergeant Wijas' sound tactical advice, a coordinated attack was launched against the fortified Viet Cong positions. As the remainder of the ranger company began their assault, they were again met by a hail of automatic weapons fire. Sergeant Wijas, seeing that the attack was about to falter, moved to the front of the assault and personally encouraged the attacking elements in a final effort. Leading the assault, Sergeant Wijas killed one Viet Cong with his pistol before being seriously wounded by a grenade. Although he had multiple wounds, and one fragment had penetrated his chest and collapsed a lung, Sergeant Wijas refused medial attention. He remained in his exposed position, directed air strikes on the enemy positions, and continued to render sound tactical advice to his counterpart. Through Sergeant Wijas courageous efforts, the lives of numerous Vietnamese soldiers were saved, and the unit was able to completely overrun the enemy position and inflict maximum casualties on the insurgent forces. Staff Sergeant Wijas extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 183 (1967)

*WILCOX, WILLIAM EIDMAN, JR.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to William Eidman Wilcox, Jr. (US51774749), Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company C, 3d Battalion, 8th Infantry, 1st Brigade, 4th Infantry Division. Specialist Four Wilcox distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 10 May 1968 while serving with an infantry unit near Binh Het. He was in charge of a listening post located three hundred meters from his company's perimeter. Detecting movement near his station, he immediately radioed the company command post of the imminent danger. Moments later a North Vietnamese Army force launched a fierce ground assault supported by mortars, rockets and heavy machine guns. He called in artillery and hurled grenades in an attempt to halt the attack, which was sweeping directly toward his position. Realizing that he and his men would soon be overrun, he organized a withdrawal and covered his troops' exit, killing several communists at a distance of ten meters. He remained at the rear of his element, exposed to intense fire, until it was within twenty-five meters of his company's perimeter. There the aggressors began to flank his men, threatening to cut them off. Completely disregarding his safety, Specialist Wilcox stood facing the enemy, firing his rifle and throwing grenades so his comrades could cross the perimeter. As he single-handedly braved the onslaught of the North Vietnamese forces, he was mortally wounded by their murderous fire. Specialist Four Wilcox's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 5332 (November 17, 1968)
Home Town: Kenmore, New York

*WILDERSPIN, VERNON CHARLES
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Vernon Charles Wilderspin (US54959220), Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Troop B, 3d Squadron, 4th Cavalry, 25th Infantry Division. Specialist Four Wilderspin distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 31 January 1968 as medical aidman for an armor platoon on a combat mission near Tan Son Nhut Air Base. His unit was moving to engage a combined Viet Cong and North Vietnamese Army force which had attacked the air base. It was suddenly subjected to intense automatic weapons and anti-tank rocket fire from the numerically superior enemy. Specialist Wilderspin unhesitantly leaped from his armored personnel carrier to administer first aid to wounded comrades. Exposing himself to a devastating curtain of hostile fire, he gallantly moved throughout the raging battlefield to conduct his lifesaving mission. After aiding many casualties, including his seriously wounded platoon leader, Specialist Wilderspin saw his platoon sergeant lying helplessly wounded in an open area. With a hail of enemy bullets striking all around him, he fearlessly raced to the side of his smitten comrade and performed skillful emergency medical treatment which saved the man's life. Just as he had finished tending the platoon sergeant's wounds, Specialist Wilderspin was hit by the withering hostile fire and instantly killed. Specialist Four Wildersin's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 1841 (April 20, 1968)
Home Town: East Lansing, Michigan

WILHELM, JERALD W.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Jerald W. Wilhelm (US56378871), Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company B, 3d Battalion, 22d Infantry, 3d Brigade, 4th Infantry Division. Sergeant Wilhelm distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 21 March 1967 while serving as team leader of an infantry unit occupying a fire support base camp deep in hostile territory. During the early morning hours the base camp was attacked by a large Viet Cong force firing mortars, automatic weapons and recoilless rifles. The position occupied by Sergeant Wilhelm and one other man came under heavy attack immediately because of its vital importance in the defense. When his comrade was mortally wounded early in the battle, he continued to defend the position alone with deadly accurate fire to repel the mass assaults. At one point, he allowed a group of Viet Cong to advance close to his position before firing his only Claymore mine causing ten hostile casualties. After his unit withdrew to a more secure position, he took over a machine gun and directed extremely accurate fire on the enemy although he had little experience with the weapon. His courageous actions were instrumental in the defeat of the numerically superior insurgent force. Sergeant Wilhelm's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 4488 (September 2, 1967)

WILLIAMS, FELIX E.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Felix E. Williams, First Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company E, 3d Battalion, 8th Infantry, 4th Infantry Division. First Lieutenant Williams distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 3 and 4 March 1969 during a reconnaissance-in-force operation near Kontum City in the Central Highlands. Lieutenant Williams was leading his platoon up a ridge when they encountered a small number of North Vietnamese troops. He and his men quickly subdued the enemy elements, but before they could move on, they were taken under fire by a battalion-size enemy force occupying bunker fortifications. Lieutenant Williams quickly deployed his men and directed their return fire while awaiting reinforcements. Locating the bunker from which the heaviest suppressive fire was coming, he crawled through open terrain under intense fire, carefully advanced to within feet of the hostile emplacement, and blasted its defenders with grenades. Minutes later, he again edged his way to another bunker and destroyed its occupants with a hand grenade. Lieutenant Williams then made his way back to the company's main force and there learned that the company commander and other officers had been killed. With this news, he quickly regrouped the company's remaining elements and set up a second defense line. Shortly after, the enemy assaulted in great numbers. Lieutenant Williams was wounded by grenade fragmentation in the onslaught, but he drew the company's remnants into a tight defensive perimeter and then coordinated artillery and air strikes on hostile positions only meters from his own. In the morning, he dispatched a patrol to recover those left dead and wounded on the ridge in the previous day's fighting, but meeting with fierce resistance, the patrol was forced to pull back almost immediately. Again the adversary assaulted, rushing the exhausted Americans under barrages of mortar fire. Fearing imminent loss of all his men, Lieutenant Williams radioed for helicopter extraction and then led his tattered troops to the arranged landing zone and safety. First Lieutenant Williams' extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 4140 (November 13, 1969)

*WILLIAMS, HAROLD DAVID
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Harold David Williams (565749235), Staff Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company C (Ranger), 75th Infantry (Airborne), 173d Airborne Brigade. Staff Sergeant Williams distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 1 August 1969 while leading a Ranger Team north of Song Moa. Just after perpetrating an ambush on an enemy element, the team was set upon by the main hostile force. Sergeant Williams immediately called in gunships on the communists who quickly surrounded the small team. He initiated a grenade counterassault and repositioned his team to withstand the vicious attack. When a team member fell to enemy fire, Sergeant Williams advanced under a fusillade to render assistance to his comrade. Despite wounds received when an antitank round detonated nearby, he elected to remain with his men, directing their defense. When a brief lull developed in the exchange of fire, Sergeant Williams and one of his men moved outside the perimeter to recover a survival radio dropped by a friendly casualty. In the attempt both were wounded by small arms fire, yet Sergeant Williams again refused evacuation. During the subsequent battle, he succumbed to his wounds. Staff Sergeant Williams' extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 4389 (December 6, 1969)
Born: October 29, 1947 at Los Angeles, California
Home Town: Los Angeles, California

WILLIAMS, JACK L.
(First Award)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Jack L. Williams (RA17292324), Sergeant First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Detachment A-341, 5th Special Forces Group (Airborne), 1st Special Forces. Sergeant First Class Williams distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 14 January 1967 while serving as senior Special Forces Advisor to a Vietnamese strike force conducting a search and destroy mission near the Cambodian border. When the unit received an intense barrage of machine gun fire from a North Vietnamese battalion, Sergeant Williams immediately rushed to the forward position and organized a perimeter defense. Although the enemy was at a more advantageous position, Sergeant Williams commanded and led a fierce attack that overcame the enemy emplacements. He then consolidated his position, directed the recovery of the casualties and called for air support. On one occasion, two Vietnamese soldiers were forced to abandon a wounded man due to enemy fire. Observing this, Sergeant Williams fearlessly charged the enemy position and single-handedly overpowered its occupants. Still receiving enemy fire, he went to the aid of the wounded soldier and carried him to safety. Sergeant First Class Williams' extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 3740 (July 22, 1967)
Other Award: Distinguished Service Cross w/OLC (Vietnam)

WILLIAMS, JACK L.
(Second Award)
Synopsis:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting a Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster in lieu of a Second Award of the Distinguished Service Cross to Jack L. Williams (RA17292324), Master Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Detachment A-341, 5th Special Forces Group (Airborne), 1st Special Forces. Sergeant First Class Williams distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 24 March 1967. His extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 1624 (April 10, 1968)
Other Award: Distinguished Service Cross (Vietnam)
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*WILLIAMS, LESTER, JR.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Lester Williams, Jr. (US51981676), Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Battery C, 8th Battalion, 6th Artillery, 1st Infantry Division. Specialist Four Williams distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 1 November 1968 while serving as cannoneer. His unit's night position, located west of An Loc, was fiercely attacked by a North Vietnamese Army force. Following an initial barrage of mortar and rocket-propelled grenade rounds, the aggressors launched a ground attack which brought them deep within the defensive perimeter. Exposing himself to the fusillade, Specialist Williams ran to his bunker and fired his machine gun with deadly accuracy into the advancing North Vietnamese soldiers. Suddenly an enemy grenade landed in the bunker. He immediately threw himself upon it to save the lives of his comrades and was killed by the explosion. Specialist Four Williams' extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 5902 (December 30, 1968)
Home Town: Bridgeton, New Jersey

WILLIAMS, MICHAEL J.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Michael J. Williams (OF-111319), First Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company A, 2d Battalion, 506th Infantry, 3d Brigade, 101st Airborne Division (Airmobile). First Lieutenant Williams distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 25 July 1968 as a platoon leader during combat operations near Cu Chi. Lieutenant Williams' company was met by fierce small arms and machine gun fire as it was inserted by helicopter into an enemy-held area. Crossing seventy-five meters of bullet- swept rice paddy, he reached a hedgerow in which the majority of the hostile positions were concealed. He quickly silenced one machine gun with a hand grenade, and then crawled through the bushes, methodically destroying the communists' strongholds and killing the occupants. Despite receiving numerous fragmentation wounds in his legs from an enemy hand grenade, he stood up and charged a machine gun position which had his comrades pinned down. Completely exposing himself to the hostile fusillade, he tossed a grenade into the bunker's opening and used the fortification itself as a shield from the blast. After insuring that the machine gun had been rendered useless, he crawled into the open rice paddy and began moving back to his men, but was shot through both legs by the communists and again received fragmentation wounds in his legs from an enemy hand grenade. Realizing that he would be killed if he moved, Lieutenant Williams played dead for eight hours not more than twenty feet from the hostile positions. When darkness came he dragged himself more than three hundred meters back to his unit's night location. First Lieutenant Williams' extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 489 (February 12, 1969)

*WILLIAMS, RALPH LEROY
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Ralph Leroy Williams (0-5334184), First Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company C, 1st Battalion (Mechanized), 5th Infantry, 2d Brigade, 25th Infantry Division. First Lieutenant Williams distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous action on 14 February 1968 as an infantry platoon leader while conducting a reconnaissance-in-force mission in enemy territory. The lead elements of his platoon were suddenly subjected to intense automatic weapons, small arms and recoilless rifle fire from heavily fortified North Vietnamese Army positions. Fearlessly exposing himself to the savage barrage, Lieutenant Williams rushed forward to reorganize his troops and evacuate casualties. While running to a farmhouse to assist a wounded platoon member, he was struck in the knee by enemy fire. He quickly treated his wound and began moving toward cover when he noticed that one of his machine gunners had been hit by tracer bullets, causing the soldier's clothing to burst into flames. Heedless of a raking curtain of hostile fire, Lieutenant Williams crawled across the bullet-swept terrain and removed the man's burning garments. Then, as he raised up to throw a smoke grenade at the North Vietnamese to screen the withdrawal of his troops, he was mortally wounded. First Lieutenant Williams' extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 1800 (April 18, 1968)
Home Town: Billings, Montana

WILLIAMS, ROBERT R.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Robert R. Williams (0-22962), Major General, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Headquarters, 1st Aviation Brigade. Major General Williams distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 18 February 1968 as commander of a helicopter operating near Phu Loi. He was alerted to a mortar and rocket attack on Phu Loi installation and immediately flew to the site to aid in locating the enemy firing positions. Fully aware that there were no gunships available in the immediate area for fire support, General Williams unhesitantly began a search for the hostile emplacements and located two enemy rocket sites near the compound. He then skillfully maneuvered his aircraft in repeated firing passes on the weapons, and his door gunners destroyed both of them. Immediately after neutralizing the rocket positions, he monitored a call requesting medical evacuation for a seriously wounded American soldier. General Williams responded immediately and landed his aircraft amid enemy mortar fire on the besieged airfield. The casualty was loaded aboard and successfully evacuated to medical facilities at Long Binh. General Williams' outstanding flying ability and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his command, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 5139 (1968)

WILLIAMSON, ELLIS W.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Ellis W. Williamson, Brigadier General, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in action in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam while commanding the 173d Airborne Brigade (Separate). Brigadier General Williamson distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism on 9 November 1965, while directing military operations after a Viet Cong element of regimental size launched a vicious attack on personnel of the First Battalion (Airborne), 503d Infantry on the day before. When the friendly forces sustained heavy casualties after engaging wave upon wave of fanatical hostile troops, General Williamson directed the pilot of his aircraft to attempt a descent into a 250-foot funnel through a jungle canopy to evacuate the wounded and the dead. Although no other helicopter was able to negotiate the pass, a successful landing was made. Once upon the ground, General Williamson exposed himself to the hostile gun fire, made his way among the front line troops, and gave assistance and encouragement to both the wounded and the defenders. Lending his own aircraft to aid in the evacuation of the wounded from the battlefield, he elected to remain in the combat zone and personally directed the further tactical deployment of the remaining units. His dynamic leadership, indomitable courage, and determination paved the way for the landing of evacuation helicopters, resulted in the removal of a great number of wounded and dead, and inspired the remaining troops with the spirit needed to achieve victory. General Williamson's extraordinary heroism on the battlefield and his profound concern for the individual soldier are in the highest traditions of the United States Army and reflect great credit upon himself and the armed forces of his country.
Department of the Army, General Orders No. 27 (June 27, 1966)

*WILLIAMSON, ROBERT JOE
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Robert Joe Williamson (RA16775081), Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Advisory Team 100, United States Military Assistance Command, Vietnam. Sergeant Williamson distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 31 January 1968 while serving as Advisory to a Vietnamese Ranger unit on a search and destroy operation in the outskirts of Saigon. While moving along a canal south of the city, his unit was attacked by an estimated Viet Cong battalion firing automatic weapons and rockets. Braving withering hostile fire, Sergeant Williamson led his men in an assault across one hundred and fifty meters of open ground to a dike wall, and, from there, directed devastating fire on the determined enemy. When his machine gunner was hit and fell in front of the wall into the enemy line of fire, Sergeant Williamson unhesitantly went to the soldier's rescue, and, amid a hail of bullets, pulled the man to safety. Attempts to mark the Viet Cong positions with smoke grenades, which would enable accurate air strikes, were hampered by a treeline and a barbed wire fence to the front. Realizing the importance of air support, Sergeant Williamson once more advanced forward of the dike under intense fire and threw two grenades on the enemy location. Several Vietnamese soldiers and a fellow advisor had advanced to a small house forward of the friendly lines and were pinned down by a vicious Viet Cong barrage. Completely disregarding his own safety, Sergeant Williamson led an assault directly into the face of hostile weapons to relieve the trapped men. He was mortally wounded by enemy fire as he furiously charged the Viet Cong positions. His fearless actions inspired his men to continue the attack, overwhelm and decisively defeat the enemy forces. Sergeant Williamson's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 1172 (March 18, 1968)
Home Town: Lawrenceburg, Indiana

*WILSON, GERALD LEE
Synopsis:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Gerald Lee Wilson (RA14718110), Staff Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Detachment B-20, Company B, 5th Special Forces Group (Airborne), 1st Special Forces. Staff Sergeant Wilson distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 21 May 1969. His extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 2202 (June 23, 1969)
Born: August 5, 1942 at San Antonio, Texas
Home Town: Albany, Georgia
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WILSON, LEE E.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Lee E. Wilson (US51878078), Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 2d Battalion (Mechanized), 47th Infantry, 1st Brigade, 9th Infantry Division. Specialist Four Wilson distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 31 January 1968 as scout observer of a mechanized infantry unit conducting a combat operation in the village of Ho Nai. During its attack on the enemy-infested village, Specialist Wilson's platoon was subjected to intense hostile small arms, machine gun and rocket fire. When his armored personnel carrier came to a halt amid the savage crossfire of bullets and exploding rockets, Specialist Wilson leaped to the ground, fearlessly maneuvered to the rear of the enemy's positions and placed fierce fire on them. He determinedly pressed his personal assaults, continuously braving the relentless barrage of Viet Cong fire as he attacked. With complete disregard for his safety, Specialist Wilson repeatedly returned to his vehicle to procure additional ammunition when he had expended all that he could carry. One of his assaults was a gallant frontal attack on an enemy rocket position, which he destroyed with a light anti-tank weapon. Although seriously wounded by an insurgent's hand grenade during the charge, Specialist Wilson refused medical treatment and evacuation from the raging battlefield. Instead, he ran back to his armored vehicle, obtained more anti-tank rockets, returned to the fight, and eliminated another rocket position and a Viet Cong automatic rifle emplacement. His dauntless efforts in close combat contributed greatly to the defeat of the numerically superior enemy force. Specialist Four Wilson's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 2270 (May 15, 1968)

*WILSON, RICHARD LEE
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Richard Lee Wilson (443-50-0725), Private First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company C, 3d Battalion, 7th Infantry, 199th Infantry Brigade. Private First Class Wilson distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous action on 7 August 1969 during an airmobile operation. He was walking in the lead position for his squad as they cautiously pursued a path into a thick nipa palm growth bordering a river. When the lead elements had barely entered the vegetation, heavy automatic weapons fire erupted to Private Wilson's front. He spotted an enemy bunker through the dense foliage and immediately alerted his squad to its presence. The heavy volume of hostile fire prevented the friendly troops from advancing on the concealed enemy. Realizing the impossibility of employing grenades in the tall nipa palm, Private Wilson charged the hostile bunker, placing effective suppressive fire on the enemy as he ran. He had advanced to within ten feet of the hostile fortification when he was mortally wounded. His aggressive actions had enabled his fellow soldiers to move out of their exposed positions and then rout the enemy. Private First Class Wilson's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 3649 (September 26, 1969)
Home Town: Sapulpa, Oklahoma

WINLAND, FLOYD
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Floyd Winland, Sergeant First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam. Sergeant First Class Winland distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions from 5 April to 8 April 1972 while serving as an Infantry Light Weapons Advisor to the 52d Infantry Regimental Task Force, 18th Division, Army of the Republic of Vietnam, United States Military Assistance Command, Vietnam, Advisory Team 87. From 5 to 7 April the 52d Regimental Task Force was subjected to indirect enemy attacks on their firebases in Binh Long Province. On 7 April the enemy launched a determined ground attack on the beleaguered position. Sergeant Winland exposed himself to the withering enemy fire in order to move a critically wounded Vietnamese soldier to a position of safety and to administer first aid. While moving the wounded man, he sustained mortar fragment wounds in the leg. When the Task Force withdrew from the firebase, he assisted and encouraged the wounded soldiers, sharing his own limited water supply with those in need. When his Senior Battalion Liaison Officer and a number of Vietnamese soldiers became seriously wounded, Sergeant Winland remained in a dangerously exposed position to attempt an airlift of the wounded personnel although three attempts were repulsed by a fusillade of enemy ground fire. Over 300 enemy mortar rounds and rockets were directed against Sergeant Winland's position that day. Throughout the night he assisted the Senior Advisor in placing tactical air strikes and helicopter gunships to protect their position. The next morning he personally eliminated an attack by an enemy force to overrun their position and directed a larger enemy force into the defensive fire of an armed aircraft. While being extracted by aircraft, Sergeant Winland suffered numerous fragment wounds in the face and severe penetration wounds in both hands. His personal heroism was directly responsible for sparing numerous personnel from injury and possible death while inflicting numerous casualties on the enemy. Sergeant First Class Winland's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, MACV Support Command General Orders No. 1637 (July 25, 1972)

*WINNINGHAM, CLIFTON
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Clifton Winningham (RA14317635), Sergeant First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism on 5 March 1966 while serving as a member of the 1st Platoon, Company C, 2d Battalion, 28th Infantry and engaged in military operations in the Republic of Vietnam. During a vicious assault by the Viet Cong, Platoon Sergeant Winningham displayed indomitable courage. When informed that a man stationed at a listening post was wounded and unable to return to the friendly lines, Platoon Sergeant Winningham attempted to reach the wounded man by crawling out of the perimeter but was stopped by hostile gun fire. He then rallied four men to follow behind him to cover his movement to the listening post. After they reached this position and found their comrade dead, he unhesitatingly volunteered to remain alone at the listening post to cover the return of the men with their deceased comrade. With complete disregard for his own safety, he remained at the post until the men reentered the friendly lines before proceeding behind them. As the hostile action intensified, he continued to encourage the men and to demonstrate his gallant efforts until felled by hostile gun fire. Platoon Sergeant Winningham's extraordinary heroism on the battlefield reflects great credit upon himself, the United States Army, and the armed forces of his country.
Department of the Army, General Orders No. 45 (December 1, 1966)
Home Town: Junction City, Kansas

*WINSTON, ALVESTER LEE
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Alvester Lee Winston (RA13988545), Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company A, 3d Battalion, 47th Infantry, 9th Infantry Division. Specialist Four Winston distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 4 December 1967 while serving as medical aidman of an infantry company on a search and destroy mission in enemy territory. The unit was patrolling a small river aboard armored troop carriers when it was suddenly subjected to intense fire from a Viet Cong force on the river banks. As Specialist Winston's platoon made a beach landing and began penetrating dense foliage, it was hit by another withering enemy barrage. The insurgents were firing rockets, automatic weapons and rifle grenades from well fortified bunkers and immediately pinned the friendly troops down. Hearing calls for medical aid from two comrades who fell fifty meters to his front, Specialist Winston raced through a savage curtain of fire to the injured soldiers. As he began treating their wounds, he was struck by an enemy sniper's bullet. Heedless of his won serious wound, he continued his lifesaving efforts even though he realized the Viet Cong had pinpointed his position. He was mortally wounded while valiantly shielding his patients from a raking fusillade. His dauntless courage in close combat inspired his fellow soldiers to overcome and completely annihilate the insurgent force. Specialist Four Winston's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 1023 (March 7, 1968)
Home Town: Baltimore, Maryland

WISHIK, JEFFREY
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Jeffrey Wishik (0-5334937), First Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company D, 3d Battalion (Airborne), 187th Infantry, 3d Brigade, 101st Airborne Division. First Lieutenant Wishik distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 18 and 19 March 1968 s a platoon leader during a reconnaissance-in-force mission conducted by his company and an attached reconnaissance platoon near Phuoc Vinh. The combined American forces engaged an estimated reinforced battalion of Viet Cong and North Vietnamese Army regulars. The fierce enemy onslaught of small arm, automatic weapon, claymore mine, and grenade fire inflicted heavy casualties on the point platoon, including the platoon leader. Charging through the storm of bullets, Lieutenant Wishik took command of the stricken lead element. While exposed to the hostile fire, he positioned the men and carried the wounded back to the defensive perimeter. Receiving the order to pull back, he directed an orderly withdrawal, and then began to lead a scouting party to secure a trail to a landing zone where the casualties could be evacuated. As they made their way to the site, the communists exploded a command detonated mine, injuring three members of the party and killing the others. As he staggered to his feet, bleeding profusely from multiple fragmentation wounds, Lieutenant Wishik was assaulted by six screaming enemy soldiers. Dropping to one knee, he switched his rifle to full automatic and shot the assailants with one long burst. Through the remainder of the long night the three survivors feigned death to avoid capture by hostile troops who passed within inches of their position. Just before dawn and shortly before they were rescued, a lone North Vietnamese Army regular came upon them. After rifling Lieutenant Wishik's body to obtain "C" rations, the soldier turned him over, sat on him and began to eat his food. With his last bit of strength, Lieutenant Wishik drew his survival knife and slit the throat of the intruder. First Lieutenant Wishik's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 501 (February 13, 1969)
Born: at Montgomery, Alabama
Home Town: Montgomery, Alabama

*WITHERSPOON, THOMAS, JR.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Thomas Witherspoon, Jr. (RA12493334), Staff Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Advisory Team 4, United States Military Assistance Command, Vietnam. Staff Sergeant Witherspoon distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 8 October 1967 while serving as village security force advisor of the Hai Lang District. While accompanying his commander to a meeting at the sector headquarters, they were savagely ambushed by a large Viet Cong force firing automatic weapons from well-concealed positions twenty meters from the roadway. Although the entire roadway was blanketed with a hail of bullets, he refused to seek cover and used his body to shield his commander from the withering fire. His action permitted his commander to drive out of the ambush zone and radio for help. Sergeant Witherspoon was mortally wounded while unselfishly placing the welfare of a fellow soldier above his own safety. His fearless act was responsible for saving the life of his commander and preventing the insurgents from completing a successful ambush. Staff Sergeant Witherspoon's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 6251 (December 5, 1967)
Home Town: New York, New York

WOLFORD, GROVER G.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Grover G. Wolford (RA13369445), Sergeant First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company C, 2d Battalion, 506th Infantry, 3d Brigade, 101st Airborne Division (Airmobile). Platoon Sergeant Wolford distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 4 April 1968 during a reconnaissance-in-force mission near Bien Hoa. While moving through dense jungle undergrowth, his company encountered a reinforced Viet Cong company armed with automatic weapons and rocket-propelled grenades. Sergeant Wolford unhesitatingly exposed himself to the enemy barrage to direct the fires of his men and organize the evacuation of casualties. spotting a wounded man lying at the base of a machine gun emplacement, he fearlessly destroyed the hostile position and rescued the soldier. After carrying two other injured men to safety, he was informed that the third platoon had suffered many casualties, including the platoon leader. Rushing to the beleaguered element, he extracted the platoon leader and two other wounded comrades from the killing zone. He then withdrew his men so that air strikes could be called in. When he discovered that three soldiers were missing, he returned to the bullet-swept area and, locating the men, brought them back to his unit's position. Platoon Sergeant Wolford's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 247 (January 23, 1969)

*WOLTER, JAMES LESTER
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to James Lester Wolter (US56504057), Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company C, 4th Battalion, 3d Infantry, 11th Infantry Brigade, Americal Division. Specialist Four Wolter distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on the evening of 7 January 1969 as a member of a Short Range Reconnaissance Patrol. As the team set up their night defensive positions, heavy rain began to fall, increasing the danger of enemy activity. Shortly thereafter, movement was detected in close proximity to the camp. Attempts were made to set off claymore mines but, under the cover of darkness and the heavy rain, the enemy had managed to cut the wires leading to the explosives. The team suddenly came under a barrage of small arms fire, grenades and satchel charges. Pinned down by the intense fusillade, the patrol was unable to return fire during the initial moments, permitting the enemy to approach their position and toss two fragmentation grenades into their location. Seeing the missiles, Specialist Wolter warned the others and with complete disregard for his personal safety, shielded his comrades from the deadly blasts. By his quick actions and complete selflessness, Specialist Wolter saved the lives of his fellow team members. Specialist Four Wolter's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 984 (March 21, 1969)
Home Town: Granada, Minnesota

WOOD, DANIEL
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Daniel Wood, Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company D, 6th Battalion, 31st Infantry, 3d Brigade, 9th Infantry Division. Specialist Four Wood distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 10 May 1970 while participating in combat operations in Svay Rieng Province, Republic of Cambodia. On this date, Specialist Wood and his unit had just entered an apparently deserted Cambodian village when they were suddenly ambushed by a well concealed enemy force. Realizing the gravity of the situation, Specialist Wood immediately charged the nearest enemy position and silenced it with a flurry of accurate fire. Observing several comrades pinned down in the murderous enemy crossfire, the specialist then began a series of assaults on three other enemy positions, systematically destroying each with the aid of a comrade. After running low on ammunition, Specialist Wood ran back through the fusillade to secure additional ammunition and immediately resumed his determined assault. Locating an enemy command bunker in a heavily fortified position, the specialist advanced to within a few meters of the position and destroyed it with fragmentation grenades. After destroying three more enemy bunkers in a similar manner, Specialist Wood was seriously wounded by fragments from an exploding enemy mortar round that landed between him and several other companions. Ignoring his own painful wounds, he dragged the other wounded allies to positions of relative safety. He then returned to his original position and destroyed two more hostile positions with the aid of other comrades. When the friendly unit was directed to move to a nearby helicopter evacuation point, Specialist Wood remained to the rear of the withdrawal to cover his companions and assist the wounded to the area. The specialist continued his determined actions until directed by his commanding officer to board one of the rescue helicopters. Specialist Four Wood's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 5047 (1970)

WOODS, JAMES O.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to James O. Woods (US52632669), Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company A, 1st Battalion, 8th Infantry, 4th Infantry Division. Sergeant Woods distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 22 March 1967 while serving with an infantry company during an attack by a numerically superior Viet Cong force near the Cambodian border. Heedless of hostile fire which was raking positions of his units, Sergeant Woods ran from man to man in the defensive line to offer encouragement and direct their fire and movement. When medics ran out of first aid supplies, he unhesitatingly moved beyond the defensive perimeter to gather first aid packets from discarded equipment in the field. He was pinned down by outbursts of hostile fire many times, but dauntlessly continued until he had gathered all of the extra supplies available. At one point, Sergeant Woods spotted a small group of insurgents moving toward a small rise from which they would gain a firing advantage on the friendly force. He again left the perimeter to cut them off and placed himself between the enemy and his men. As they appeared out of the undergrowth, he killed all of them before they could inflict any casualties on his platoon. When he discovered that his platoon had been separated from the rest of the company, Sergeant Woods once again left the safety of his unit's perimeter to cut a path through the thick vegetation to the company's position. He then returned to his men and used the trail to move the wounded to a helicopter landing zone for evacuation. His courageous leadership throughout the firefight enabled his men to repulse the overwhelmingly larger hostile force and inflict numerous casualties on the insurgents. Sergeant Woods' extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 3627 (July 18, 1967)

WOODS, LUTHER L.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Luther L. Woods (0-99029), Captain (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company C, 2d Battalion (Airborne), 327th Infantry Regiment, 1st Brigade, 101st Airborne Division. Captain Woods distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions during the period 19 to 23 July 1966, while commanding Company C, 327th Infantry during a search and destroy operation near Trung Luong. Shortly after being helilifted into the area, the company made contact with an entrenched Viet Cong force. Rather than risk heavy casualties, Captain Woods called in artillery and air strikes while he established a perimeter. Throughout the night, he dauntlessly exposed himself to harassing mortar and automatic weapons fire to direct the defense. After successfully repulsing a fierce Viet Cong assault on the morning of 20 June, Caption Woods ordered two platoons into a counterattack. When they suffered serious casualties, he committed his reserve and aggressively moved along the line and affected an orderly withdrawal. The next day, when one of his platoons was cut off and pinned down, he secured a helicopter to determine the disposition of the unit. His aircraft distracted enough Viet Cong fire to allow the besieged platoon to break out of the hostile crossfire. As he flew over his company positions, Captain Woods noticed that insurgent strong points completely surrounded his perimeter. He requested and received reinforcements and quickly deployed them in the defenses for the night. Just before dawn on 22 June, the insurgents launched an intense mortar attack followed by human wave assaults. During the next several hours, Captain Woods displayed exceptional courage and inspired leadership, as he was always present at the most critical position, directing the defensive fire and encouraging his men. At the conclusion of the battle, 96 insurgents had been killed. Refusing to extract his men without their dead, he again led his company against the remaining Viet Cong on 23 June and recovered the bodies. Captain Woods' unimpeachable valor and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 189 (January 15, 1967)

WORBINGTON, JOHN H.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to John H. Worbington (RA18712959), Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company B, 1st Battalion, 16th Infantry, 1st Infantry Division. Specialist Four Worbington distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 28 February 1967 while serving as acting sergeant of a reconnaissance patrol during a search and destroy mission near Tay Ninh. While moving through thick jungle, the platoon was ambushed by a numerically superior Viet Cong force. Several men were hit within a few minutes, and the patrol lost its leader to the enemy fire. Specialist Worbington took charge of the men and organized them into a perimeter to hold off the enemy's assaults. Although he was constantly under heavy fire, he collected all of the undamaged weapons from fallen men and redistributed them among the survivors. He then ran to the point of heaviest contact and marked the enemy's positions with smoke grenades to identify them for supporting armed aircraft. Returning to his men, Specialist Worbington began to treat the wounded. He spotted a Viet Cong machine gun team moving up on the flank. He single-handedly killed the three men and captured their weapon. As he was returning again to his men, an insurgent met him and shot his rifle from his hands. He rolled to the ground, grabbed an enemy rifle that was lying in the dirt, and shot the attacker. When he reached his men, two more Viet Cong were crawling towards his position. He waited until they had approached to within a few meters and killed both of them. Throughout the engagement, he encouraged his men and kept them organized in an effective defensive against the enemy's assaults until reinforcements could arrive. Specialist Four Worbington's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 5071 (October 4, 1967)

WORLEY, MORRIS G.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Morris G. Worley, Sergeant First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Command and Control (Central), FOB 2 (Kontum), Headquarters, 5th Special Forces Group (Airborne), 1st Special Forces. Sergeant First Class Worley distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions from 20 January 1967 to 21 January 1967 while serving as a Special Forces advisor to a joint American-Vietnamese platoon on combat patrol deep in hostile territory. When the point squad be was leading suddenly came under enemy fire, Sergeant Worley fearlessly charged the hostile positions, firing his rifle as he ran. His bold actions quickly inspired his men, who assaulted and overcame the insurgents, capturing one North Vietnamese soldier. After his force moved another 75 meters down the trail, it was attacked again. Sergeant Worley dauntlessly moved through a hail of bullets and laid down a devastating base of fire to allow the squad to reach cover. Having expended all his ammunition, he noticed an enemy soldier hiding in the brush a few meters to his front. Unmindful of the dangers and armed only with a bowie knife, Sergeant Worley darted through the undergrowth and single-handedly captured the insurgent. The next day, having again volunteered to take the point, he alertly detected an ambush and initiated a fire fight which killed two enemy solders. Contemptuous of the intense hostile fire, Sergeant Worley remained on the trail and engaged the North Vietnamese positions. Even when three comrades were killed at his side, he continued to fight until his rifle was shot away and he was severely wounded in the face, side and right arm. Dazed, but undaunted, he drew his pistol with his left hand, emptied the magazine at the enemy, and then threw a grenade which silenced the hostile position. Despite his painful wounds, Sergeant Worley refused to be carried and walked 275 meters to the landing zone where the unit was extracted,. His intrepid actions broke three enemy traps, saved many lives and enabled the team to complete its vital mission. Sergeant First Class Worley's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 1621 (April 11, 1967)

WRIGHT, LARRY D.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Larry D. Wright (RA16798308), Specialist Fifth Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Troop A, 1st Squadron, 9th Cavalry, 1st Cavalry Division (Airmobile). Specialist Five Wright distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 2 October 1966 while serving as door gunner on the command helicopter during aerial support of combat maneuvers near Hung Lac. Prior to the infiltration of infantry units into this area, Specialist Wright's helicopter surveyed the territory, spotting small groups approaching the village of Hung Lac. An infantry platoon was helilifted into a landing zone to search the village and made heavy contact with a Viet Cong Battalion. Specialist Wright's aircraft quickly flew in and hovered over the friendly unit, enabling him to pour suppressive fire into the enemy emplacements. During the fierce firefight, he spotted several Viet Cong in a trench about to ambush a friendly element. His extremely accurate fire, to within three meters of the friendly soldiers, destroyed the ambush and killed several of the attackers. When confronted with a machine gun position firing directly at his aircraft, Specialist Wright disregarded his personal safety by stepping out onto the skid of the helicopter and destroying that emplacement. Having landed near a pinned down squad, Specialist Wright again ignored the threat of hostile fire which ravaged the zone to race to the side of a wounded man lying in the open. He carried the casualty to the aircraft and placed him aboard just as enemy rounds hit the helicopter's hydraulic system and fuel cell. After the pilot flew to safety 150 meters away, Specialist Wright returned to the battlefield in an unarmed helicopter to rescue two more wounded men. Throughout the battle, he dauntlessly ignored imminent danger to himself to support the infantry forces. Specialist Five Wright's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 2497 (May 30, 1967)

*WRIGHT, LEROY NORRIS
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Leroy Norris Wright (RA51032309), Sergeant First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Command and Control (Central), Detachment B-56, 5th Special Forces Group (Airborne), 1st Special Forces. Sergeant First Class Wright distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 2 May 1968 as team leader of a twelve-man Special Forces/Vietnamese reconnaissance patrol on an operation in hostile territory. Shortly after landing, his team spotted three Viet Cong soldiers. Immediately leading his team in evasive maneuvers, Sergeant Wright attempted to continue his reconnoiter. When the team made light contact with the enemy and the mission was completely compromised, he moved the patrol to a landing zone and called for an extraction helicopter. Savage enemy automatic weapons and small arms fire was directed at the team by a numerically superior enemy force. Sergeant Wright deployed his troops in a tight defensive perimeter and called for air support. Then, braving a hail of enemy bullets, he maneuvered his men toward the approaching rescue ship. The aircraft was driven off by an intense hostile fusillade that killed one door gunner and wounded the other. Sergeant Wright was also wounded by the ravaging barrage, but he completely disregarded his personal welfare and exposed himself to the savage fire to lead his force to a more secure position. The determined attackers closed in on the team and showered hand grenades on its position. Seeing a grenade land near one of his men, Sergeant Wright shouted a warning and dove between the soldier and the enemy explosive, absorbing the bulk of the blast. He was killed while selflessly placing the safety of a fellow soldier above his own in the heat of battle. Sergeant First Class Wright's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 2878 (June 17, 1969)
Home Town: Newark, New Jersey

*WRIGHT, ROBERT CARROL
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Robert Carrol Wright (144-48-7528), Second Lieutenant (Field Artillery), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Battery A, 6th Battalion, 11th Artillery, American Division. Second Lieutenant Wright distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 2 January 1970 while in command of an advance party of field artillerymen establishing a firebase on Hill 285 near the town of Duc Pho. Late that night the hill came under intense mortar, rocket-propelled grenade, and small arms fire from an attacking enemy force. Lieutenant Wright immediately began adjusting artillery fire on the attackers, repeatedly exposing himself to the storm of incoming fire as he attempted to determine the enemy's exact positions. Moments after the hostile force initiated their attack, an enemy mortar round impacted near Lieutenant Wright and his radio operator, inflicting them both with shrapnel wounds. Despite his wounds, Lieutenant Wright continued to coordinate friendly supporting fire until sappers breached the defensive position and were advancing toward his position. Unable to engage the infiltrators with his damaged rifle, Lieutenant Wright stood out in the open and yelled at the intruders in order to draw their attention and fire to himself and away from the wounded radioman who could not move. Lieutenant Wright then led the sappers in a running chase over forty meters away from the radioman before he was mortally felled by their fire. Second Lieutenant Wright's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 745 (March 24, 1970)
Home Town: Elk City, Oklahoma

WRIGHT, ROBERT L.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Robert L. Wright, Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company D, 2d Battalion, 501st Infantry, 2d Brigade, 101st Airborne Division (Airmobile). Specialist Wright distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 23 March 1969 while serving as the radio-telephone operator during a reconnaissance-in-force operation in the jungle region of the A Shau Valley. About three hours after sunset the night defensive perimeter came under hostile automatic weapons and rocket-propelled grenade fire. During the initial volley, a rocket grenade landed only a meter from the company command post. Even though the round had ignited and could have exploded at any moment, Specialist Wright ran through the incoming fusillade and threw his body on the round, smothering the fuse and rendering it harmless. Exposing himself to direct hostile fire, he began carrying the 81 millimeter rounds to the mortar crews, until the perimeter was threatened with penetration. He then immediately commenced firing into the enemy ranks with his weapon until the enemy withdrew. Specialist Four Wright's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 3069 (August 11, 1969)

WRIGHT, RONALD J.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Ronald J. Wright (US53530829), Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company B, 2d Battalion, 502d Infantry, 1st Brigade, 101st Airborne Division. Specialist Four Wright distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 18 May 1967 while serving as medic of an airborne infantry platoon on a reinforcing mission deep in hostile territory. While moving to relieve the pressure on a sister platoon which was heavily engaged and pinned down by a numerically superior hostile force, his unit was savagely attacked by enemy soldiers firing automatic weapons. As the intensity of the battle increased, Specialist Wright heard a call for help from a wounded comrade. Completely disregarding his own safety, he began working his way toward the man through a hail of murderous fire. The concussion from an exploding grenade knocked him to the ground and stunned him, but he quickly got up and moved to the wounded soldier. He was seriously wounded while administering aid, but he ignored his injury and moved his comrade to safety. Refusing aid for himself, he again dashed through the withering fire to reach another casualty. Despite his own weakened condition, he carried the man back through a curtain of Viet Cong fire and treated the wounded soldier until he could no longer continue. Specialist Four Wright's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 6350 (December 10, 1967)

WROBLEWSKI, FRANK MATTHEW
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Frank Matthew Wroblewski (OF-103732), Captain (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company B, 1st Battalion, 27th Infantry, 2d Brigade, 25th Infantry Division. Captain Wroblewski distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 28 September 1967 while serving as commander of an infantry company on a combat mission in Hau Nghia Province near the Cambodian border. During the first few minutes of a heliborne assault on a Viet Cong bivouac area, his unit was savagely attacked and pinned down on the landing zone by withering enemy automatic weapons and small arms fire. The insurgents completely surrounded the landing zone. Captain Wroblewski dauntlessly led his command group through a curtain of fire to a relatively protected position. He then discovered two of his platoons had lost radio contact with the command group and immediately moved to locate and lead them to join his other elements. He moved across two hundred meters of open ground, ignoring bullets striking all around him, to reach the first platoon. while he called air strikes to within fifty meters of their positions, the men began their movement toward the established defensive perimeter. Again moving across the battlefield alone, he reached the second platoon which was hopelessly trapped by extremely intense fire. The relentless barrage prevented movement without losses, so Captain Wroblewski moved into the open to direct artillery strikes within one hundred meters of his position. As the platoon withdrew, he remained behind to personally cover their movement. For four hours he continually moved among his men, inspiring them to fight furiously until reinforcements arrived and the combined forces routed the Viet Cong. Captain Wroblewski's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 81 (January 6, 1968)

WYMER, MERRILL F., JR.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Merrill F. Wymer, Jr. (0-5241669), Captain (Medical Corps), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 2d Battalion, 12th Cavalry, 2d Brigade, 1st Cavalry Division (Airmobile). Captain Wymer distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 21 August 1967 while serving as surgeon of an infantry battalion on a search and destroy mission in the Soui Ca Valley. Notified that wounded members of his battalion were in critical need of medical assistance, Captain Wymer immediately secured a helicopter and flew to the battle site. He landed in total darkness with fighting raging all around him and dashed to the front to treat the wounded who were pinned down close to enemy bunkers. He constantly exposed himself to ravaging Viet Cong firepower, disregarding his own safety to treat his seriously wounded comrades. With bullets constantly striking all around him, he moved from man to man administering aid and moving the men to more secure positions. For more than five hours he repeatedly refused to take cover although enemy fire constantly raked his positions as he moved across the bullet-swept terrain in front of friendly positions. He repeatedly and skillfully administered treatment in the darkness while the insurgents sought to stop his gallant efforts. His fearless actions in the face of grave danger were responsible for saving twelve lives and greatly inspired the friendly ground forces to fight on through the night to defeat the determined enemy. Captain Wymer's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 6208 (December 1, 1967)

X-Y

YEARTA, JESSE L.
Synopsis:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Jesse L. Yearta, Sergeant First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with as an American Advisor with the 81st Ranger Group, Airborne Division Assistance Team, Military Assistance Command, Vietnam. Sergeant First Class Yearta's distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions during the period 20 April 1972 through 20 May 1972. His extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, MACV Support Command General Orders No. 2440 (October 17, 1972)
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YOST, BURRWOOD, JR.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Burrwood Yost, Jr. (RA13756592), Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company C, 2d Battalion (Airborne), 502d Infantry, 1st Brigade, 101st Airborne Division. Sergeant Yost distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 8 September 1966 while serving as squad leader during a search and destroy mission near Tuy Hoa. As the last helicopter of the platoon landed, the whole unit received intense hostile fire from three sides. Sergeant Yost observed a partially concealed, friendly machine gun, whose ammunition lay 50 meters away. Calling for suppressive fire, with complete disregard for his safety, Sergeant Yost ran across the 50 meters of open terrain to deliver the ammunition. Later, while receiving intense hostile fire, he organized a fire team that was cutoff from its leader. During this action he dove for an incoming grenade and hurled it into the open where it exploded harmlessly, an action which he subsequently repeated three times. He then jumped up and charged a machine gun position 50 meters away and succeeded in killing the surprised Viet Cong. Sergeant Yost repeatedly threw grenades into the hostile emplacements while receiving hostile fire. This enabled the platoon to drive the Viet Cong out of their entrenched positions. Later, while in pursuit of the insurgents, Sergeant Yost led his squad to within very close range of a prepared hostile force before being detected. To clarify the positions of the Viet Cong, Sergeant Yost called to the insurgents to draw their fire. Instructing his machine gunner to lay down a base of fire, Sergeant Yost threw grenades into the enemy positions, forcing them to withdraw. Sergeant Yost's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 6752 (December 10, 1966)

YOUNG, RONALD R.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Ronald R. Young, Sergeant First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Advisory Team 87, U.S. Army Advisory Group, United States Military Assistance Command, Vietnam. Sergeant First Class Young distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions during the period 7 through 11 May 1969 while serving as light weapons infantry advisor on a reconnaissance and search operation in Long Khanh Province. When the unit made contact with a North Vietnamese regiment, Sergeant Young immediately directed supporting aircraft on the enemy positions, successfully driving the hostile force away. After a similar encounter the following day, the unit held their position. Late in the afternoon, however, the enemy again launched an attack. The reinforcements which had joined his unit were forced to withdraw under heavy pressure. Sergeant Young single-handedly engaged a flanking enemy squad, killing or wounding every member and thus opening an avenue of escape. When a machine gun opened fire less than seventy-five meters away, hindering the unit's movement, he single-handedly stormed the position and eliminated it with hand grenades. He then assumed advisory command of the unit when the senior advisor was wounded and through his calm and assuring attitude was instrumental in preventing the troops from becoming panicky and withdrawing. Throughout the night and during the following day, Sergeant Young exposed himself to enemy fire as he directed gun ships on the hostile position in an attempt to keep the unit from being overrun. When the enemy had completely surrounded them, the Vietnamese commander decided to attempt a break out. Calling aerial support fire to weaken a section of the encirclement force, Sergeant Young successfully aided the Vietnamese commander in his plight to lead the remnant of his unit out of the trap, saving many lives. Sergeant First Class Young's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 3123 (August 13, 1969)

Z

ZAUBER, JEFFERY F.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Jeffery F. Zauber (RA11752554), Specialist Fifth Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company B, 2d Battalion, 3d Infantry, 199th Infantry Brigade (Separate) (Light). Specialist Five Zauber distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous action on 2 February 1969 while serving as company medic during a mission to relieve a sister unit engaged with an enemy force. Approaching the combat area, Specialist Zauber's company came under intense enemy fire and sustained several casualties. Disregarding his own safety, he crawled forward to aid his wounded comrades. He continually exposed himself to the hostile barrages to assist and evacuate the casualties to a protected area. Having administered to the men of his company, he maneuvered forward to assist the other beleaguered unit. While treating one of the soldiers, an enemy grenade exploded nearby. Because Specialist Zauber had taken the precaution of shielding his patient, only the medic received fragmentation wounds. Despite painful lacerations, he remained with the casualty until recovery was effected. Refusing evacuation for himself, Specialist Zauber continued providing medical assistance as long as the conflict lasted. Specialist Five Zauber's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 2247 (June 25, 1969)

*ZERR, KENT MARTIN
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Kent Martin Zerr (263-70-5993), Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Troop B, 1st Squadron, 9th Cavalry, 1st Cavalry Division (Airmobile). Specialist Four Zerr distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 6 March 1970 while serving as point man of a rifle platoon operating near the Cambodian border in search of a suspected enemy bunker complex. While moving toward the suspected enemy area, Specialist Zerr spotted the first enemy bunker and alerted the rest of the platoon. As the platoon began to sweep the bunker complex, they came under intense machine gun and automatic weapons fire from an estimated company-size enemy force. One of Specialist Zerr's comrades was wounded at the beginning of the conflict. Specialist Zerr exposed himself to intense enemy fire as he rushed to his comrade's aid and moved him to a rear area. When Specialist Zerr returned to the contact area, he found his unit embattled from the front and on both flanks. Noticing an enemy machine gun position only fifteen meters away, Specialist Zerr crawled forward through enemy fire and threw a hand grenade into the bunker, destroying the machine gun and killing the bunker's three occupants. Ordered to withdraw so that gunships could be called in on the enemy positions, Specialist Zerr volunteered to provide cover fire for his platoon's withdrawal. Specialist Zerr's bravery exposed himself as he placed suppressive fire on the enemy positions and received return fire. While performing this mission, he was mortally wounded by enemy automatic weapons fire. Specialist Four Zerr's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 1944 (June 21, 1970)
Home Town: Sinking Spring, Pennsylvania

ZIOBRON, EDWARD C.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Edward C. Ziobron, Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in action in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Command and Control (Central), 5th Special Forces Group (Airborne), 1st Special Forces. Sergeant Ziobron distinguished himself while serving as squad leader of an American-Vietnamese exploitation force operating deep within enemy controlled territory. On the first day of the mission, Sergeant Ziobron's squad stopped for a security break when he detected enemy soldiers advancing towards their position. Reacting immediately he led his team in an assault against the enemy's defenses. Although seriously wounded by fragments from an impacting B-40 round, Sergeant Ziobron continued to advance upon the adversary by unleashing a steady concentration of automatic weapons fire. So devastating was his assault that the foe broke contact and fled in confusion. The following day no contact was made and the friendly element departed for a landing zone for medical evacuation of wounded personnel. Upon arrival his patrol again encountered enemy resistance. Firing light anti-tank weapons, Sergeant Ziobron successfully repelled the attackers. Refusing medical extraction, he remained with his team to direct their night defensive positions. The following morning his patrol was attacked by a north Vietnamese force firing B-40 rockets, automatic weapons and small arms. Wounded again, Sergeant Ziobron led his men in an aggressive assault, causing the foe to withdraw. Afterwards, the allied patrol moved toward an extraction site. During their movement they were again attacked by a large hostile force. Wounded in the leg, Sergeant Ziobron crawled forward, tossing hand grenades and firing his weapon upon the foe. Realizing the numerical superiority of the belligerent force, he summoned air support and directed accurate air strikes upon the hostile positions. Then, ignoring his own painful wounds, he led his patrol to an extraction zone where they were rescued the following morning. Because of his determined actions, he averted total annihilation of the allied patrol by the superior enemy force. Sergeant Ziobron's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 2349 (July 26, 1971)

 

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