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Full Text Citations For Award of
The Navy Cross

 
 To U.S. Navy Personnel
Korean War 1950-1953

To All Who Shall See These Presents Greeting:

This is to Certify that
The President of the United States of America
Takes Pleasure in Presenting


THE NAVY CROSS
to

AUSTIN, WAYNE D.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Navy Cross to Wayne D. Austin, Chief Hospital Corpsman, U.S. Navy, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as Corpsman attached to the First Battalion, Fifth Marines, FIRST Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces near Seoul, Korea, on 22 September 1950. At approximately 1645 the battalion aid station and supply dump was brought under heavy fire by enemy artillery and mortar shells, killing 7 and wounding 22 Marines. Chief Hospital Corpsman Austin, while administering aid to the wounded Marines, was severely wounded in the face, right shoulder, left arm, chest, thighs and suffered a fracture of the right ankle. He applied a compress to his ankle to partially control hemorrhage and with absolute disregard for the pain and loss of blood he continued to administer aid to the wounded. Those wounded that he could not reach were given aid by the uninjured who he instructed as he moved among the wounded. He then assisted in the organization of an evacuation party and helped load the wounded Marines into ambulances. He administered treatment to ten wounded after he was wounded and it was only after all wounded had been given medical aid and evacuated that he accepted further aid and evacuation for himself. Chief Hospital Corpsman Austin's display of outstanding courage and devotion to duty were in keeping with the traditions of the United States Naval Service.
Board Serial 18134 (November 27 1950)

BABBITT, ARLENE K.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Navy Cross to Arlene K. Babbitt (3000277), Chief Aviation Machinist's Mate, U.S. Navy, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as a Helicopter Pilot in Helicopter Utility Squadron ONE (HU-1), Unit FOURTEEN, attached to H.M.A.S. Sydney, in action against enemy aggressor forces during the rescue of two downed airmen behind enemy lines near Sariwon, Korea, on 26 October 1951. Although fully cognizant that failure of the mission would result in capture and possible death and keenly aware of the grave hazards presented by approaching darkness and the limited flying range of his helicopter, Chief Aviation Machinist's Mate Babbitt unhesitatingly volunteered to fly his extremely vulnerable aircraft deep into enemy-held territory in a brave attempt to bring back two men. Boldly approaching his objective in the face of intense hostile anti- aircraft and small-arms fire, he effected a daring landing in full view of the enemy, picked up the downed airmen and returned safe to Kimpo airfield eighty miles distant. By his outstanding courage, exceptional ability as an airman and selfless efforts in behalf of others at the risk of his own life, Chief Aviation Machinist's Mate Babbitt served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.

BORDELON, GUY PIERRE
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Navy Cross to Guy Pierre Bordelon, Lieutenant, U.S. Navy, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as Pilot of a night fighter plane in Fighting Squadron ONE HUNDRED FIFTY-TWO (VF-152), in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Seoul, Korea, on 17 July 1953. While flying a night mission, Lieutenant Bordelon intercepted and destroyed a Communist night intruder aircraft bringing to a total of five such aircraft he has destroyed recently, thereby becoming the first Navy pilot to achieve such a record during the Korean War. For many months the enemy has conducted a series of night air raids which constituted a serious threat in the thickly populated area of Seoul, and Lieutenant Bordelon's actions have assisted materially in the removal of this threat. He exhibited superior ability and airmanship by maneuvering his plane into an attack position which enabled him to destroy the enemy aircraft. His conspicuous gallantry, fearless aggressiveness and unparalleled performance in pressing home vigorous and superbly executed attacks contributed directly to the successful accomplishment of his assigned mission. By his outstanding professional skill and great personal courage, Lieutenant Bordelon's accomplishments represent an important increase in the night security of friendly forces. His conduct throughout reflects great credit upon himself and was in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.
Born: at Ruston, Louisiana
Home Town: Alexandria, Louisiana

*BOWEN, MURRAY MALONE
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Navy Cross (Posthumously) to Murray Malone Bowen (2290459), Hospital Corpsman, U.S. Navy, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as Corpsman with Company F, Second Battalion, Fifth Marines, FIRST Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces at Yong Dong Po-Ri, Korea, on 21 September 1950. When the company with which Hospitalman Bowen was serving as a Company Corpsman came under intense fire from enemy small arms, machine guns and mortars, with absolute disregard for his own personal safety he moved from wounded to wounded to render first aid. Casualties were numerous and each time he went to the aid of a wounded Marine, he came under a virtual hail of enemy fire. After having aided at least nine wounded Marines, another fell seriously wounded in an alley between two buildings which was being swept by enemy machinegun fire. Fearlessly and courageously, he moved forward into the alley to aid the wounded Marine but was killed instantly by a burst of enemy machinegun fire just before reaching the side of the wounded Marine. Hospitalman Bowen's heroic actions and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country.
Home Town: Amarillo, Texas

BRADY, JOSEPH C.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Navy Cross to Joseph C. Brady, Hospital Corpsman, U.S. Navy, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as a Corpsman attached to the FIRST Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in the Republic of Korea on 13 September 1952. Hospitalman Brady displayed unparalleled courage and devotion to his fellow men. He accompanied a patrol forward of the main line of resistance to a position where they established a combat outpost. Shortly after their arrival, the outpost was attacked on several sides by enemy ground forces. Although painfully wounded early in the action, he disregarded his personal safety and moved about administering aid to the wounded men. Exposing himself to the intense fire, he crawled forward and dragged a wounded Marine to a position of comparative safety and treated him. During this act, he received a second wound but in an effort to protect the man whom he was treating, he disregarded his personal comfort, picked up a sub machinegun and delivered accurate, killing fire on the approaching enemy. He succeeded in killing al least four of the hostile troops and repelled the assault in that sector. Later, after all other casualties had been evacuated, he permitted himself to be removed to the rear. Hospitalman Brady's heroic actions and calmness under fire served as an inspiration to all who observed him and were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.

*BREWER, DONALD EDWARD
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Navy Cross (Posthumously) to Donald Edward Brewer (394429), Lieutenant, Junior Grade, U.S. Navy (Reserve), for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as Pilot of an attack plane of Attack Squadron FORTY-FIVE (VA-45), embarked from the U.S.S. Lake Champlain (CVA-39), while flying a close air support mission against Communist-held positions on the central Korean front on 19 June 1953. Lieutenant (j.g.) Brewer pressed home his bombing attack against enemy front line troops, despite the fact that his plane was seriously damaged by 37-mm. anti-aircraft fire. Although hit at the beginning of his attack, Lieutenant (j.g.) Brewer continued his dive, dissipating life-saving altitude, until he was assured of a good hit. He was personally credited with the destruction of 150 yards of trenches containing enemy troops firing at friendly forces. Upon the completion of his attack, he bailed out of his now-disabled aircraft. However, too much altitude had been lost and his parachute did not have time to open. His disregard for personal safety and extraordinary heroism in action contributed materially to the mission of the United Nations in Korea, at the cost of his life. His devotion to duty was in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.
Home Town: Cincinnati, Ohio

BROWN, DALE W.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Navy Cross to Dale W. Brown, Hospital Corpsman, U.S. Navy, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as a Corpsman attached to the FIRST Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 18 April 1953. Serving as Corpsman to a rifle platoon, Hospitalman Brown displayed incredible courage and devotion to duty. He was a member of a combat patrol operating far forward of the main line of resistance when it was ambushed by a numerically superior enemy force. He immediately delivered deadly accurate small arms fire upon the enemy when the hostile force showered numerous types of grenades upon the position, and displaying remarkable resourcefulness and gallantry picked them up and hurled them back at the attackers. One of the deadly missiles exploded seriously wounding him. As he lay painfully wounded the enemy overran the position and picked up his body. Feigning death, he lay limp and was soon thrown aside by the hostile troops and left for dead. A friendly rescue party came upon the stricken patrol and although he was unable to physically assist in rendering first aid to the wounded men, he very capably directed a Marine on the proper method to administer morphine to him and dress his wounds. Despite his critical condition, he courageously continued to advise the rescue party of the correct procedures in which to render medical aid to his stricken comrades. He gallantly persisted in directing the expeditious evacuation of the seriously wounded men. Hospitalman Brown's unparalleled display of courage and his indomitable spirit served as an inspiration to all who observed him and were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.

BURCHICK, THOMAS A.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Navy Cross to Thomas A. Burchick, Hospital Corpsman Third Class, U.S. Navy, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as a Corpsman attached to the FIRST Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 29 May 1951. Serving as a Medical Corpsman in a rifle platoon, Hospital Corpsman Third Class Burchick was moving with the platoon over precipitous terrain in the attack of a strongly defended enemy hill position. When the order to fix bayonets was given, he, realizing that the platoon was under strength and needed every man in the assault, courageously fixed his bayonet and charged forward with the riflemen. The enemy opened up immediately with intense and accurate automatic weapons and small arms fire, and two men fell wounded. Moving without hesitation through the heavy fire to reach them, he skillfully rendered first aid, and then seized an automatic rifle from one fallen man and in defense of the wounded he continued the assault, storming a bunker and capturing three enemy soldiers. When he had expended his ammunition, he quickly seized an enemy machine gun and charged forward again through withering enemy fire, and was in the first wave to sweep over the crest of the hill. Observing four enemy troops who had been by-passed in the assault preparing to fire on his comrades behind him, he shouted a warning to a comrade and opened fire, killing the enemy soldiers. When groups of enemy opened fire from concealed bunkers, causing further casualties, he fearlessly and with complete disregard for his own personal safety advanced to within scant feet of the bunkers to drag the wounded to safety. When the position had been secured, an enemy mortar barrage hit the position, causing several more casualties, and he himself was painfully wounded. Disregarding the severe pain of his wounds he moved again through heavy enemy fire to reach them and render first aid. Throughout the difficult assault, his aggressiveness, great personal bravery, and professional skill while under enemy fire were an inspiration to all who observed him and aided materially in the success achieved by the company. Hospital Corpsman Third Class Burchick's display of outstanding courage and devotion to duty was in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.

*CHRISTENSEN, THOMAS ANDREW, JR.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Navy Cross (Posthumously) to Thomas Andrew Christensen, Jr. (4167756), Dentalman, U.S. Navy, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as a Corpsman attached to the First Amphibian Tractor Battalion, FIRST Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces at Kowan, Korea on 6 November 1950. Dentalman Christensen was serving as a Corpsman with a railroad train guard when the train was ambushed by a strong enemy force while stopped in Kowan, Korea. The train was subjected to heavy enemy fire and numerous casualties were suffered. With absolute disregard for his own personal safety, he fearlessly exposed himself to enemy fire to treat wounded Marines and move them to positions of cover. When the enemy attacked the train the second time, he was mortally wounded by enemy fire and gallantly gave his life for his country. His aggressive actions, while subjected to intense enemy fire were an inspiration to all who observed him. Dentalman Christensen's display of outstanding courage and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.
Home Town: Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

CHURCHILL, JOE VERNON
Synopsis:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Navy Cross to Joe Vernon Churchill (5655325), Chief Hospital Corpsman, U.S. Navy, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as a Corpsman attached to Company C, First Battalion, First Marines, FIRST Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 23 April 1951. His conduct throughout was in keeping with the highest traditions of the Navy of the United States.
Born: September 17, 1926 at Rogers, Arkansas
Home Town: Los Angeles, California

CLARK, EUGENE F.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Navy Cross to Eugene F. Clark, Lieutenant, U.S. Navy, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Special Operations Group, G-2, Headquarters, Far East Command, in enemy-held territory in North Korea on 13 and 14 September 1951. Lieutenant Clark was a member of a special operations group which landed in enemy-occupied territory to perform a confidential mission. Lieutenant Clark, in charge of the shore party, proceeded by boat from an offshore rendezvous lying approximately twenty miles offshore through rough seas to a point approximately two hundred yards off the beach of enemy-held territory, known to be occupied and in the process of being mined by Chinese Communist forces in anticipation of an invasion by United States forces. He then transferred to a small rubber boat and landed through the surf on the beach where he contacted friendly personnel who had been operating in that area. He then proceeded inland to the vicinity of an enemy-occupied village, reconnoitered the area and posted guards at the village and northward from the landing point to intercept Chinese Communist patrols in order to protect the remainder of the party during the performance of the confidential mission. On completion of the mission he returned by rubber boat through a surf which had subsequently become heavier and increasingly dangerous to the off-shore rendezvous. The hazards of capture based on losses of preceding groups, together with warnings received from ashore that the enemy was aware of the planned operation did not deter this gallant officer from continuing to volunteer and successfully completing the mission. He was well aware that if he fell into the hands of the enemy, who were on the alert and occupying the entire area, he could anticipate the same fate as those who had preceded him; that is, torture followed by death. Lieutenant Clark's display of outstanding courage and gallantry uphold the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.

CRAWFORD, ERNIE LARUE
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Navy Cross to Ernie LaRue Crawford, Aviation Machinist's Mate Second Class, U.S. Navy, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as crewman in a helicopter engaged in a Sea Air Rescue mission from the U.S.S. Rochester (CA-124) on 22 January 1952 in the Hungnam area of Korea. With courageous efficiency, Aviation Machinist Mate Second Class Crawford entered the near-freezing water within range of enemy shore batteries and small arms fire in order to rescue a downed pilot who, through exposure, had become unable to assist himself. When Crawford's hands became too numb for him to cut the parachute loose from the downed pilot, he attached the pilot to the rescue sling and remained in the water for twenty minutes while the helicopter delivered the unconscious pilot to a nearby ship and returned. Aviation Machinist's Mate Second Class Crawford was well aware of the danger to himself from both exposure and enemy gunfire. In the opinion of the attending medical officer, the pilot's life was saved only by this promptness of Crawford's action. Aviation Machinist's Mate Second Class Crawford's gallant devotion to duty, maintained with complete disregard for his own personal safety, was in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.

*DRAGASTIN, MARION THOMAS
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Navy Cross (Posthumously) to Marion Thomas Dragastin (496796), Lieutenant, Junior Grade, U.S. Navy (Reserve), for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations as Pilot of a fighter plane attached to and serving with Fighter Squadron EIGHT HUNDRED EIGHTY-FOUR (VF-884), attached to the U.S.S. Boxer (CVA-21). On 18 May 1951, Lieutenant (j.g.) Dragastin was participating in close air support against enemy forces in North Korea when his division leader was hit by intense ground fire while behind enemy lines. Lieutenant (j.g.) Dragastin calmly assumed the lead ship and directed the disabled plane towards a friendly area. The stricken pilot was forced to parachute from his plane over a strongly contested area near the village of Hyong-ni. Lieutenant (j.g.) Dragastin then remained close to the descending parachute and maintained protective fighter cover over the injured pilot. Flying at tree-top level in the face of withering anti-aircraft fire, he made repeated strafing attacks upon the enemy troops attempting to close in on the downed pilot. His devastating fire kept them at bay until he himself was fatally hit. His relentless fighting spirit and courageous devotion to duty with complete disregard for his own personal safety were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.
Home Town: Kansas City, Missouri

FIELDING, TEDDY ROOSEVELT
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Navy Cross to Teddy Roosevelt Fielding, Lieutenant, U.S. Navy, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as a Reconnaissance Swimmer during an amphibious raid against enemy aggressor forces on the northeast coast of Korea on the night of 3 December 1951. After the boat in which he was riding grounded on some rocks close to the enemy- held beach, Lieutenant Fielding with courageous skill and utter disregard for his own safety, dived into shallow water to disarm a demolition charge which had been thrown overboard, thereby averting an explosion that would have resulted in the loss of the boat, her crew, and the troops aboard at the time. This act of spontaneous heroism reflected the aggressive and fearless spirit which he displayed during the entire operation against the enemy. During both raids on the nights of 2 and 3 December, Lieutenant Fielding coordinated his bold and daring work in conducting reconnaissance of the assault area, with that of the 41st Marine Commandos, and persisted in his efforts until a thorough reconnaissance of the target beaches was completed and this vital intelligence delivered to boat and troop personnel. His relentless fighting spirit and courageous devotion to duty, maintained with complete disregard for his own safety, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.

FOSTER, FRED TOWNSEND
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Navy Cross to Fred Townsend Foster, Hospital Corpsman Third Class, U.S. Navy, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as a Hospital Corpsman with a Marine Infantry Company, 5th Marines, FIRST Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Yudam-ni, Korea, on 28 November 1950. When his platoon suffered five casualties while reinforcing a friendly unit subjected to a concerted enemy night attack, Hospital Corpsman Third Class Foster unhesitatingly proceeded to the aid of the wounded men and, braving intense hostile small-arms and grenade fire, personally evacuated all five from the heavily engaged front lines. Exercising outstanding initiative, he established a temporary aid station in a warm-out tent approximately fifty yards behind the lines, thereby providing protection for the wounded against the bitter sub-zero temperatures. When at one point the enemy succeeded in forcing a penetration of the friendly line and threatened to overrun his aid station, he quickly organized a defense perimeter, utilizing the less seriously wounded of the thirty casualties for whom he was then caring and, skillfully placing them to disrupt all enemy attempts to take the position, carried on with his treatment of the wounded. Returning periodically to insure the security of the perimeter, Foster found the men particularly hard-pressed on one occasion, and seizing a rifle in defense of the helpless wounded, killed three of the enemy. Although the hostile fire steadily increased in violence, riddling his tent and inflicting wounds on the casualties, he steadfastly refused to seek cover and moved continually about, giving aid and comfort to the wounded and tenaciously defending his post. When at daybreak the enemy attackers were repulsed, he immediately took charge of an evacuation detail and successfully removed all casualties to the battalion aid station approximately one mile distant. His heroic initiative, selfless determination and valiant devotion to duty in the face of heavy odds reflect the highest credit upon Foster and the United States Naval Service.

GENTLEMAN, WILLIAM F.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Navy Cross to William F. Gentleman, Hospitalman, U.S. Navy, for extraordinary heroism in action against the enemy while serving with a Marine infantry company in Korea on 15 August 1952. Serving as platoon corpsman, Hospitalman Gentleman displayed exceptional professional competence and complete intrepidity when the unit was subjected to heavy enemy mortar and artillery fire. With no concern for his personal safety, he fearlessly left the comparative safety of the reverse slope of the hill to administer medical aid to wounded Marines on the forward slope. Throughout the intense barrage, he moved form man to man, shouting words of encouragement and organizing stretcher parties to evacuate the casualties, until, after nine hours, he himself was severely wounded. His devotion to duty and professional skill were inspirational to all who observed him and were responsible for the saving of many lives. Hospitalman Gentleman's courageous actions were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.

GOODING, CALLIS C.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Navy Cross to Callis C. Gooding, Aviation Machinist's Mate Third Class, U.S. Navy, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as crewman of a helicopter in Helicopter Squadron ONE (HU-1), Unit FOURTEEN, attached to H.M.A.S. Sydney, during the rescue of two downed airmen behind enemy lines near Sariwon, Korea, on 26 October 1951. Despite grave hazards presented by the limited flying range of the rescue helicopter, approaching darkness, and the certainty of capture or possible death if the mission failed, Aviation Machinist's Mate Third Class Gooding voluntarily accompanied the helicopter pilot deep into enemy-held territory to assist in the rescue. Approaching the objective in the face of intense, hostile anti-aircraft and small arms fire, Aviation Machinist's Mate Third Class Gooding provided effective cover and fire support with a submachine gun, accounting for two enemy casualties during the period in which the helicopter landed, picked up the two airmen and departed to the safety of Kimpo airfield eighty miles away. By his great personal courage and inspiring devotion to duty, Aviation Machinist's Mate Third Class Gooding contributed in large measure to the successful rescue of the downed airman. His actions reflect the highest credit upon himself and the United States Naval Service.

*HOVATTER, DONALD JAMES
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Navy Cross (Posthumously) to Donald James Hovatter (5682107), Hospital Corpsman Third Class, U.S. Navy, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as Corpsman attached to Company A, First Battalion, Seventh Marines, FIRST Marine Division (Reinforced), in Korea on 29 May 1951. A Rifle Platoon Corpsman, Hospital Corpsman Third Class Hovatter exhibited extreme courage and devotion to duty. While the company was engaged in the attack of a heavily defended enemy position, it was suddenly brought under a deadly volume of accurate small arms, mortar and artillery fire. Although fully aware of the danger, he fearlessly moved from one wounded Marine to another administering aid. When he observed another fallen comrade lying on the forward slope, he unhesitatingly raced down the slope in the face of almost certain death until he too fell seriously wounded by enemy fire. Although the wounded man still lay approximately one hundred yards away, he struggled toward him and was actually administering aid when he was again struck by enemy fire and was mortally wounded, gallantly giving his life for his country. Hospital Corpsman Third Class Hovatter's display of outstanding courage and devotion to duty was in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.
Home Town: Yuma, Arizona

KEE, VANCE E.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Navy Cross to Vance E. Kee, Hospital Corpsman Third Class, U.S. Navy, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as Corpsman attached to a Marine infantry company with the FIRST Marine Division (Reinforced), near Yang Gu, Korea, on 19 June 1951. Hospital Corpsman Third Class Kee, moved through a mine field while subjected to intense enemy fire to administer first aid to a wounded Marine. He then summoned a stretcher party to evacuate the casualty and while en route, one of the litter bearers stepped on an enemy mine. With complete disregard for his own personal safety, after hearing the ignition of the primer, he threw himself across the body of the wounded Marine. Although blown several feet and severely dazed by the resulting blast, he rushed to the aid of the second wounded man. After assuring himself that both men were adequately cared for, he probed with his feet until he found a safe passage through the mine field. He then led two stretcher parties into the mine field to evacuate the wounded, thereby enabling them to receive complete medical treatment much sooner than otherwise would have been possible. His display of initiative and skill served as an inspiration to all who observed him and contributed materially to the success achieved by the company. Hospitalman Third Class Kee's courageous actions and outstanding devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.

*KEENAN, JOSEPH FRANCIS
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Navy Cross (Posthumously) to Joseph Francis Keenan (9007036), Hospital Corpsman Third Class, U.S. Navy, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as a Hospital Corpsman for Company F, Second Battalion, Fifth Marines, FIRST Marine Division (Reinforced), in the Republic of Korea on 26 and 27 March 1953. On the evening of 26 March, 3,500 enemy soldiers attacked 120 Marines at three small outposts forward of the Marines' main line of resistance. Petty Officer Keenan's company moved forward to repel the enemy when they were pinned down by murderous artillery and mortar fire. While moving to treat one of the numerous casualties, he was struck down by shrapnel in the hand. Petty Officer Keenan waived off Medical attention from another hospital corpsman, directing that assistance to his wounded Marines, when he was struck a second time in the head. Despite the serious nature of his wounds, he returned to the fight immediately after basic treatment and a re-supply of medical items. Moving through open terrain to treat the wounded, Petty Officer Keenan was partially blinded by dirt from one of the many nearby explosions. Although his sight was impaired, he found and assisted two hospital corpsmen in caring for bleeding Marines in an open position. Having helped the casualties there, Petty Officer Keenan struck out to find other wounded despite his own pain and the constant threat of deadly shellfire. Petty Officer Keenan then proceeded to collect and treat six casualties in a gully that afforded scant cover. When two Marines saw his wounds and his dangerous situation, he defiantly refused their pleas to seek treatment and safety for himself. Holding his duty to his patients paramount, he remained with his downed comrades. Later in the fight, Petty Officer Keenan was struck by shrapnel as he continued his ministrations of mercy, gallantly sacrificing his life for his Marines and for his Country. Petty Officer Keenan's courage, drive and unselfish dedication to duty reflected great credit upon himself and were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.
Authorized by Public Law 105-261, section 532 (d)
Home Town: Dorchester, Massachusetts

KITKA, ALEX JOSEPH
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Navy Cross to Alex Joseph Kitka, Hospital Corpsman Third Class, U.S. Navy, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as a Corpsman attached to a Marine Rifle Company of the First Battalion, Fifth Marine Regiment, FIRST Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in the Republic of Korea on the night of 16 - 17 July 1953. When a reconnaissance patrol operating 3,000 yards forward of the main line of resistance in strongly defended enemy territory was ambushed by a numerically superior hostile force and sustained over fifty percent casualties in the initial stage of the battle, Hospital Corpsman Third Class Kitka, along with other members of the support and evacuation team, moved out quickly to the assistance of the beleaguered patrol. Before reaching the patrol's position, the team suffered numerous casualties because of the heavy enemy mortar fire. Although he received painful chest wounds and was unable to move his right arm, Hospitalman Kitka administered first aid to his fallen comrades before moving up the hill through intense small-arms and mortar fire to the besieged patrol. After reaching his destination, he commenced removing the wounded members of the patrol to cover where he rendered first aid, ignoring his own serious condition and refusing to leave the battle area until all known casualties were evacuated. By his great personal valor and heroic efforts in behalf of others, Hospital Corpsman Third Class Kitka upheld the finest traditions of the United States Naval Service.
Born: at Redjacket, West Virginia
Home Town: Matewan, West Virginia

*MAGDA, JOHN JOSEPH (MIA)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Navy Cross (Posthumously) to John Joseph Magda (0-98678), Lieutenant Commander, U.S. Navy, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as a Pilot with Fighting Squadron ONE HUNDRED NINETY-ONE (VF-191) attached to Carrier Air Group NINETEEN on board the U.S.S. Princeton (CV-37), in action against enemy aggressor forces in the Republic of Korea on 8 March 1951. Skillfully leading a daring strike against enemy installations at Tanch'on, Lieutenant Commander Magda braved intense hostile anti-aircraft fire to press home vigorous bombing and strafing runs. When his aircraft was struck by enemy fire and burst into flames, he gallantly continued to carry out the attack, destroying several gun emplacements and inflicting severe damage on nearby rail installations. With all his ammunition expended, he turned his fiercely burning plane seaward in an attempt to avert capture and the possible compromise of his aircraft. Successful in reaching this final objective before his plane crashed out of control into the sea, Lieutenant Commander Magda, by his inspiring leadership, indomitable fighting spirit and selfless devotion to the fulfillment of his assigned mission, upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country.
Authority: Board Serial 62 (January 25, 1952)
Born: July 23, 1918 at Camp Taylor, Kentucky
Home Town: Camp Taylor, Kentucky

MASON, DONALD E.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Navy Cross to Donald E. Mason, Hospital Corpsman, U.S. Navy, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as a Medical Corpsman attached to Company B, First Battalion, Seventh Marines, FIRST Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on the night of 12 October 1952. Serving as a Corpsman, Hospitalman Mason displayed unbelievable courage and professional skill in the performance of his duties while under heavy enemy fire. When the platoon was pinned down by heavy enemy machine-gun and automatic-weapons fire forward of the main line of resistance, Mason unhesitatingly moved about the devastated area to administer first aid and to lend words of encouragement to the many wounded Marines. Although painfully wounded himself and temporarily blinded by the searing flash burns of an enemy concussion grenade which exploded directly in front of him, he steadfastly continued to render medical treatment to other casualties. Informed that a comrade was seriously wounded and was unable to be moved, he requested to be taken by the hand and led to the side of the stricken man where he succeeded in applying a difficult splint by sense of touch. By his courageous initiative, resolute fortitude and selfless efforts in behalf of others, Mason served to inspire all who observed him and was instrumental in saving the lives of many wounded Marines, thereby upholding the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.
Born: April 13, 1933 at Indianapolis, Indiana
Home Town: Indianapolis, Indiana

MAUSEN, JOHN E., JR.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Navy Cross to John E. Mausen, Jr., Hospital Corpsman, U.S. Navy, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with a Marine infantry company of the FIRST Marine Division (Reinforced), in Korea on 6 October 1952. Serving as a Corpsman, Hospitalman Mausen displayed unbelievable courage and devotion to duty while under intense enemy fire. He accompanied the assaulting platoon during a company attack on an enemy strongpoint and although painfully wounded early in the action, he expressed complete disregard for his personal safety and continued administering emergency treatment to other casualties incurred during the initial assault. Although the area was swept by deadly enemy mortar, small arms and grenade fire, he repeatedly exposed himself in order to move from casualty to casualty performing his duties. As the tempo of battle increased with a second assault on the hostile position, he received a second wound rendering him unable to walk or to use his left arm or leg. Undaunted by his critical condition, he displayed incredible stamina as he crawled about the devastated area, treating the wounds of his comrades. Hospitalman Mausen's courageous actions served as an inspiration to all who observed him and his unparalleled heroism was in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.

McEACHERN, HAROLD O.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Navy Cross to Harold O. McEachern, Lieutenant, Junior Grade, U.S. Navy, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while participating in aerial flight against the enemy as a member of an Air-Sea Rescue Squadron in Korea. On 5 August 1952, Lieutenant (j.g.) McEachern, as Pilot of a Navy Helicopter in Helicopter Utility Squadron ONE (HU-1), participated in the daring rescue of the Commanding Officer of a Marine aircraft group whose aircraft had crashed deep in enemy territory. Resolutely maneuvering at tree top level in the face of intense hostile ground fire, Lieutenant (j.g.) McEachern promptly located the downed aviator and skillfully effected the pickup from a position in precipitous terrain that afforded the helicopter less than four feet of clearance. During the hazardous return over enemy infested territory, increasingly accurate barrages of defensive fire severely damaged the helicopter, but Lieutenant (j.g.) McEachern elected to continue directly on course because of the critical condition of the Marine aviator. Dangerously low on fuel, he maneuvered his battle-damaged helicopter through the hostile fire and conducted a successful night landing less than four hours after the rescued pilot had parachuted fifty miles behind enemy lines. Lieutenant (j.g.) McEachern's heroic actions and exemplary initiative were responsible for saving the life of a Marine aviator. His courageous conduct, outstanding perseverance and steadfast devotion to duty throughout reflected great credit upon himself and were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.
Born: August 25, 1924 at Clyde, Texas
Home Town: San Diego, California

*McVEEN, JAMES HERBERT
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Navy Cross (Posthumously) to James Herbert McVeen (2359014), Hospital Corpsman, U.S. Navy, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while attached to Headquarters and Service Company, Second Battalion, Fifth Marines, FIRST Marine Division (Reinforced), in Korea on 27 March 1953. Serving as Platoon Corpsman, Hospitalman McVeen displayed incredible courage and devotion to duty. During an attack on an outpost recently captured by the enemy, the unit was subjected to devastating hostile mortar and small arms fire which caused over seventy-five percent casualties within the platoon. Expressing absolute disregard for his personal safety, Hospitalman McVeen courageously exposed himself to move among his wounded comrades in order to render invaluable medical aid and direct their expeditious evacuation. Despite the fact that he had gone twenty-four hours without food or sleep, his heroic actions were tireless. Although painfully wounded and literally thrown off his feet by the intense enemy fire, he refused to be evacuated and dauntlessly continued with his vital life-saving administrations until he fell mortally wounded, gallantly giving his life for his country. While performing his intrepid actions and expending his energy beyond normal endurance, he had completely exhausted his medical supplies as he willingly sacrificed his life for his stricken comrades. Hospitalman McVeen's unparalleled display of courage and exceptional devotion to duty served as an inspiration to all who observed him and were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.
Home Town: Buffalo, New York

*MERRICK, RICHARD CHARLES
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Navy Cross (Posthumously) to Richard Charles Merrick (0-77551), Commander, U.S. Navy, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as Commander, Carrier Air Group NINETEEN (CAG-19), embarked from the U.S.S. Princeton (CV-37), and as a Strike Leader during operations against enemy North Korean and Chinese Communist forces in direct support of United Nations forces in Korea, in May 1951. On two separate occasions, displaying extraordinary qualities of leadership and personal heroism, Commander Merrick participated in and led such aggressive attacks against the enemy and enemy installations that the resultant damage imposed a visible setback to the Pukhan River as scheduled, and of relieving an extremely hard-pressed and threatened unit of our own forces. His bravery in the face of intense enemy fire were characteristic of this outstanding officer whose conduct and performance were at all times an example of the spirit which fosters the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country.
Home Town: Weiner, Idaho

NEAL, GEORGE MILTON (POW)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Navy Cross to George Milton Neal, Aviation Machinist's Mate Third Class, U.S. Navy, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Helicopter Utility Squadron ONE (HU-1), a Navy Helicopter Rescue Unit embarked from H.M.A.S. Sydney over North Korea on 3 July 1951. Aviation Machinist's Mate Third Class Neal volunteered as crewman to fly in a helicopter deep into North Korean mountains to attempt the rescue of a Marine Aviator who had been shot down and was trapped by the enemy. Despite a low overcast of clouds which prevented their being protected by fighter aircraft, the helicopter crew descended below the clouds where the downed aviator's parachute was located. Not finding the aviator during their first tour of the valley, the helicopter crew entered the area a second time in the face of intense enemy fire, approaching darkness, and adverse weather, any one of which made the mission extremely hazardous. Because of their courageous persistence, and their absolute disregard for their own safety, the helicopter's crews' search was successful. Aviation Machinist's Mate Third Class Neal fearlessly exposed himself to the intense enemy gunfire and guided the rescue sling to the downed aviator. As Neal was hoisting him up to the helicopter, the enemy fire became so effective that the helicopter was disabled and crashed. Neal then assisted his pilot and the Marine aviator, who was seriously burned, in attempting to escape from the enemy troops. The small party effectively evaded the enemy forces for nine days under the most adverse conditions during which time Aviation Machinist's Mate Third Class Neal contributed immeasurably to the success of the maneuver by his unflagging physical endurance, courageous persistence and fighting spirit which did much to maintain the morale of his companions. Aviation Machinist's Mate Third Class Neal's devotion to duty, to his country, and to his fellow men as well as his outstanding conduct before and after capture and the indomitable courage he displayed at all times were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.

*O'DONNELL, TERRANCE WILLIAM
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Navy Cross (Posthumously) to Terrance William O'Donnell (3040513), Hospital Corpsman, U.S. Navy, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with a Marine infantry company of the FIRST Marine Division (Reinforced), in Korea on 25 June 1952. Hospitalman O'Donnell, serving with a rifle platoon on a combat outpost forward of the main line of resistance, displayed exceptional courage and devotion to duty when the position was attacked and overrun by a numerically superior enemy force. Although seriously wounded, he continued to expose himself to heavy enemy small arms and artillery fire, moving about the trench line from bunker to bunker giving aid where needed and personally carrying wounded men to cover until he collapsed and died of his wounds, gallantly giving his life for his country. His heroic actions were directly responsible for the saving of the lives of several Marines. Hospitalman O'Donnell's display of outstanding courage and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.
Home Town: Chicago, Illinois

PARKER, WALLER J.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Navy Cross to Waller J. Parker, Hospital Corpsman, U.S. Navy (Reserve), for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as a Corpsman attached to a Marine Infantry Company, First Battalion, Fifth Marines, FIRST Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces near Yudam-ni, Korea on 29 November 1950. With the platoon reinforcing a friendly unit in defense of a strategic ridge during a strong enemy night attack, Parker bravely moved through a hail of fire to aid six men critically wounded by an intense hostile mortar barrage. Although the ridge was devoid of cover, he boldly administered treatment to the casualties while fully exposed to the enemy fire and supervised their evacuation to positions of comparative safety on the reverse slope. Despite a painful face wound sustained early in the action, he continually moved among the men in total darkness and sub-zero weather, administering to casualties while exposed to close-range hostile fire throughout six consecutive enemy attacks. Unable to perform his duties while wearing gloves, he continued to work in the bitter cold until his hands became severely frost bitten and, when the medical supplies were expended, constantly spoke words of encouragement to the wounded while keeping them as comfortable as possible. Seizing a weapon during one particularly violent enemy assault, Parker assisted in defending the stricken men in his charge and, although seriously wounded a second time when nearing the end of the night- long engagement, gallantly refused aid for himself until all the casualties had been evacuated. By his daring initiative, fortitude and selfless efforts in behalf of his comrades, he served to inspire all who observed him and aided immeasurably in the saving of many lives. His outstanding courage, skill and steadfast devotion to duty reflect the highest credit upon Parker and the United States Naval Service.
Home Town: Richmond, California

POLLEY, PAUL N.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Navy Cross to Paul N. Polley, Hospital Corpsman, U.S. Navy, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as a Medical Corpsman with the FIRST Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on the night of 26 - 27 March 1953. With his unit subjected to a murderous barrage of hostile mortar, artillery and small- arms fire after reaching an intermediate objective during a counterattack against a heavily entrenched and numerically superior enemy force occupying commanding ground on a bitterly contested outpost far in advance of the mainline of resistance, Hospitalman Polley courageously moved about in the face of a veritable curtain of fire to render medical treatment to the numerous casualties. Although painfully wounded and temporarily blinded when a round of enemy fire shattered the immediate area, he steadfastly refused evacuation and valiantly continued to search out his stricken comrades by sense of touch, skillfully administering first aid until physically exhausted and ordered to be evacuated. While en route to the main line of resistance, he approached an area where a number of wounded Marines were being processed for evacuation and, insisting on remaining with them, was led from one man to another, administering medical assistance until he was completely incapacitated by his wounds. By his exceptional fortitude, inspiring initiative and selfless efforts in behalf of others, Polley was instrumental in saving the lives of many of his comrades. His great personal valor reflects the highest credit upon himself and enhances the finest traditions of the United States Naval Service.

*POPE, CHARLES EDWARD (MIA)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Navy Cross (Posthumously) to Charles Edward Pope (5550558), Hospital Corpsman Third Class, U.S. Navy, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with a Marine infantry company of the FIRST Marine Division (Reinforced), in Korea on 22 February 1953. Serving as a Corpsman, Hospital Corpsman Third Class Pope displayed incredible courage and devotion to duty. He was a member of a combat patrol operating far forward of the main line of resistance when it was subjected to murderous hostile mortar and artillery fire and several casualties were sustained. Expressing complete disregard for his personal safety, he courageously traversed the entire area rendering first aid to his injured comrades. Although painfully wounded during the initial phase of the action, he gallantly disregarded his condition and continued his intrepid movements. Ignoring suggestions to take cover and despite his weakened condition, he never faltered in his devotion to his comrades. While moving forward to aid a stricken Marine, he collapsed, mortally wounded, gallantly giving his life for his country. Hospital Corpsman Third Class Pope's unparalleled display of courage together with his selfless devotion to his comrades served as an inspiration to all who observed him and were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.
Home Town: Kalispell, Montana

SERRANO, ROBERT
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Navy Cross to Robert Serrano, Hospital Corpsman, U.S. Navy, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with a Marine infantry company of the Third Battalion, Seventh Marines, FIRST Marine Division (Reinforced), in Korea on 12 September 1951. Serving as a Medical Corpsman, Hospitalman Serrano was moving with the assault platoon in the attack of a heavily fortified and strongly defended enemy hill position, when the unit was subjected to intense and accurate mortar and small arms fire from well concealed bunkers. As he was fearlessly dashing through the heavy enemy fire to reach a wounded Marine, he accidentally tripped the wire of a hidden anti-personnel mine. Hearing the snap of the fuse primer, and realizing that his wounded comrade lay helpless beside the deadly explosive, he courageously and with complete disregard for his own personal safety threw himself on the man to shield him from the explosion. Although he was seriously wounded in the back and legs by fragments, and was blown several feet by the concussion, he crawled back to his comrade and administered first aid to him. Although suffering severe pain from his multiple wounds, he refused to seek medical aid for himself until he had completed treatment of his comrade, and then, refusing a stretcher, crawled part of the way to the aid station. Hospitalman Serrano's display of outstanding courage and devotion to duty was in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.
Born: December 12, 1930 at El Paso, Texas
Home Town: El Paso, Texas

SHOULDICE, DARCY V.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Navy Cross to Darcy V. Shouldice, Lieutenant Commander, U.S. Navy, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as Commander of Mine Division 31 and in Tactical Command of that Division during mine sweeping operations off Wonsan Harbor, on the Coast of Korea, on 12 October 1950. When two heavy mine sweepers of another Division were mined within a few minutes of each other and were still under severe enemy gunfire from hostile shore batteries, Lieutenant Commander Shouldice led his Division into supporting positions exposed to enemy fire in order to rescue survivors and to take in tow a third heavy mine sweeper. Maneuvering his command skillfully throughout this operation in un-swept and densely mined waters, he returned effective gunfire against enemy shore batteries until his Division and tow had reached safe waters without further loss or serious damage. In the following days, Lieutenant Commander Shouldice continued to lead his Division in the vital task of sweeping heavily mined areas until an anchorage and a channel had been cleared to the landing beaches, thereby contributing essentially to the success of Naval operations in the Wonsan area. His inspiring leadership and gallant devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.

*SMITH, BILLY DOYLE
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Navy Cross (Posthumously) to Billy Doyle Smith (3457374), Hospital Corpsman, U.S. Navy, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company H, Third Battalion, Seventh Marines, FIRST Marine Division (Reinforced), in Korea from 11 to 13 July 1953. Serving as a Corpsman, Hospitalman Smith displayed incredible courage and devotion to duty. While a vital friendly outpost position located far forward of the main line of resistance was under constant devastating enemy mortar and artillery fire, he unhesitatingly volunteered to relieve the Corpsman assigned to the outpost. Exhibiting remarkable resourcefulness under the deadly hostile fire, he continuously exposed himself in order to care for his stricken comrades and carry them to safety. For two days he courageously continued in this capacity, rendering urgently needed first aid to the wounded Marines and competently directing their expeditious evacuation. When the enemy unleashed a particularly intensive mortar and artillery barrage upon the outpost and several friendly casualties were sustained, he gallantly leaped to his feet and ignoring his own safety proceeded forward to offer medical aid. Observing a stricken comrade lying in a completely exposed area, he dauntlessly crawled through the deadly hail of hostile fire to aid him. While heroically attempting to cover the injured Marine with his body in order to protect him from the intense enemy fire, he fell, mortally wounded, gallantly giving his life for his country. Through his unselfish sacrifice and intrepid actions, the wounded man was not further injured by the hostile fire and was later evacuated to a place of safety. Hospitalman Smith's unparalleled display of courage and loyalty to his comrades served as an inspiration to all who observed him and were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.
Home Town: Cosby, Missouri

STONE, CLETUS H.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Navy Cross to Cletus H. Stone, Hospital Corpsman, U.S. Navy, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as a Corpsman with a Marine Company, FIRST Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 16 September 1951. When his unit was suddenly subjected to cross fire from two bunkers while he was advancing with the assault squad of a rifle platoon during an attack against a group of strongly fortified enemy emplacements located along a ridge line, Hospital Corpsman Stone bravely exposed himself to the hostile fire to treat casualties and assisted the stricken men to a covered position. With the remainder of the squad pinned down and receiving further casualties, Hospital Corpsman Stone promptly gathered the grenades dropped by the wounded men, made his way through intense enemy machine- gun, grenade and small-arms fire to a position closely flanking the hostile bunkers and, in a gallant attempt to protect his comrades, hurled the missiles into the enemy emplacements, killing all the occupants and completely neutralizing both strong points. By his indomitable courage, outstanding initiative and valiant efforts on behalf of his comrades in the face of great odds, Hospital Corpsman Stone served to inspire all who observed him and was directly instrumental in the successful seizure of the platoon's objective. His exceptional bravery and superb self-command reflect the highest credit upon himself and enhance the finest traditions of the United States Naval Service.

THORNTON, JOHN WILLIAM (POW)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Navy Cross to John William Thornton (391003), Lieutenant, Junior Grade, U.S. Navy (Reserve), for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as Pilot of a helicopter serving with Navy Helicopter Utility Squadron ONE ( HU-1 ), in action against enemy aggressor forces near Wonsan, Korea, on 31 March 1951. Lieutenant (j.g.) Thornton volunteered for the dangerous mission of rescuing a key intelligence unit trapped on a high ridge behind enemy lines. First to arrive at the scene, he daringly attempted a landing on a small clearing atop the ridge and, although his craft was wrecked during this intricate operation, quickly extricated him- self and prepared to direct other helicopters as they arrived to rescue the marooned personnel. Undaunted by the hail of small arms fire from the fast converging hostile forces, he gallantly refused to be evacuated and continued to direct the hovering helicopters as they hoisted three men into their aircraft and departed. After requesting one of the rescue pilots to return to the area with guns and ammunition, he was last seen firing his rifle at the enemy besiegers. By his exceptional resourcefulness, he was directly responsible for the safe evacuation of three men possessing vital intelligence. His outstanding courage, valiant fighting spirit and selfless devotion to duty reflect the highest credit upon Lieutenant (j.g.) Thornton and the United States Naval Service.

TROMBLY, ALFRED D.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Navy Cross to Alfred D. Trombly, Hospital Corpsman Third Class, U.S. Navy, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as a Corpsman with a Marine Company of the Second Battalion, Seventh Marines, FIRST Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 8 June 1951. Serving as a Medical Corpsman, Hospital Corpsman Third Class Trombly advanced with his company into enemy terrain when the unit was subjected to an intense barrage of enemy mortar and artillery fire, causing numerous casualties. Courageously and with complete disregard for his personal safety, he refused to take cover from the vicious hail of bursting shells and shrapnel, and despite a serious wound in the leg, crawled from fallen man to fallen man, coolly administering first aid. When the enemy fire increased in intensity, he threw himself over two wounded comrades, using his own body as a shield to protect them. He was again seriously wounded in the back by shrapnel, but despite the excruciating pain of his wounds, he continued fearlessly to administer aid to the wounded, refusing aid for himself until all other casualties had been properly cared for. Hospital Corpsman Third Class Trombly's display of outstanding courage and devotion to duty was in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.

*VOGEL, RAYMOND WILLIAM, JR.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Navy Cross (Posthumously) to Raymond William Vogel, Jr. (0-77151), Commander, U.S. Navy, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as Commander, Air Group ELEVEN (AG-11), attached to the U.S.S. Philippine Sea (CV-47), in action against enemy North Korean forces in the vicinity of Seoul, Korea, on 19 August 1950. Commander Vogel led an attack by Corsair and Skyraider aircraft against the railroad bridge at Seoul, Korea, which constituted a vital link in the land communications of the enemy. In the face of a heavy concentration of anti-aircraft defenses, he pressed home his attack and obtained the first bomb hit on the bridge. Following his bombing attack on the bridge, he unstintingly and without hesitation directed his fire on enemy anti-aircraft batteries. While thus protecting the other aircraft in his group during their attack on the bridge, Commander Vogel's plane was struck by intense anti-aircraft fire and was shot down. By his outstanding courage, his aggressive leadership, and his disregard for personal danger, Commander Vogel upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.
Home Town: Ann Arbor, Michigan

WADDILL, THOMAS H.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Navy Cross to Thomas H. Waddill, Hospital Corpsman, U.S. Navy, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as a Corpsman with a Marine Company, FIRST Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 26 March 1953. Throughout the fierce enemy attack on that night, Hospitalman Waddill conducted himself in a valorous and courageous manner, inspiring all who saw him. He administered aid and treated the wounded in the face of heavy enemy artillery and small arms fire, showing complete disregard for his own safety. At one point during the enemy assault Hospitalman Waddill threw himself on several wounded men to protect them from enemy small arms fire from a distance of ten feet. By this heroic action Hospitalman Waddill saved, temporarily, the lives of three men and in the process was severely wounded. Hospitalman Waddill's action was in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.

WAGNER, ROBERT C.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Navy Cross to Robert C. Wagner, Hospital Corpsman, U.S. Navy, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as a Corpsman with a Marine Company of the Seventh Marines, FIRST Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 7 September 1951. Hospitalman Wagner was accompanying a platoon on a combat patrol with the assigned mission of destroying several enemy bunkers on strategic Hill 673. Forward elements of the patrol had advanced almost to the crest of the hill when the enemy unleashed a vicious automatic weapons crossfire, which pinned down and cut off the leading element from the remainder of the platoon. Although he was warned by the platoon leader to withdraw to a covered position, Hospitalman Wagner observed a wounded comrade lying in a completely exposed position swept by withering enemy fire. Completely disregarding his own personal safety, he unhesitatingly dashed through the heavy enemy fire to reach and render aid to the wounded man. Despite the increasing intensity of the enemy fire directed at him, he skillfully treated his comrade and then carried him to a sheltered position, although he was painfully wounded in the hand. Then, observing a second casualty isolated from the remainder of the platoon, he took charge of him as well, remaining with both men in a concealed position until darkness would permit their returning to friendly lines. Although he was unable to move in any direction because of the withering enemy fire, he continued to render all possible aid to his patients, without further disclosing their position to the enemy. When the platoon was forced to withdraw, leaving him alone with the two wounded men, he remained with them for approximately forty hours, within a few yards of the enemy position, and finally succeeded in assisting them to the safety of friendly lines. His great personal bravery and heroic actions undoubtedly saved his comrades from death or capture by the enemy. Hospitalman Wagner's display of outstanding courage and devotion to duty was in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.

WHEAR, ROGER G., JR.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Navy Cross to Roger G. Whear, Jr., Hospital Corpsman, U.S. Navy, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as a Corpsman with a Marine Company, FIRST Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 20 August 1952. Serving as a Corpsman with a reconnaissance patrol, Hospitalman Whear exhibited exceptional professional competence and complete intrepidity. Although seriously wounded by a mine explosion which wounded two other men, he crawled through the mined area to treat his wounded comrades. Upon the death of one of the men he continued his way through the mined area to administer to the other Marine. Hospitalman Whear bandaged the man's wounds, stopped the bleeding, and prevented shock which might have proved fatal otherwise. When the rescue party arrived, Hospitalman Whear was still treating the wounded man and continued doing so until ordered to receive treatment for his own wounds. His gallant conduct and selfless devotion to duty were an inspiration to all who observed him and were responsible for saving the life of the wounded Marine. Hospitalman Whear's courageous actions were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.

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