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Full Text Citations For Award of
 
The Navy Cross
US Marine Corps Awards - Vietnam 

 

To All Who Shall See These Presents Greeting:

This is to Certify that
The President of the United States of America
Takes Pride in Presenting


THE NAVY CROSS
to

EADES, LAWRENCE M.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Navy Cross to Lawrence M. Eades (2231362), Lance Corporal, U.S. Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism while serving with Combined Action Company P, Third Combined Action Group, III Marine Amphibious Force, in connection with operations against the enemy in the Republic of Vietnam. During the early morning hours of 2 February 1968, Corporal Hades' unit came under intense enemy small-arms, automatic weapons, mortar and rocket fire supporting an aggressive ground assault by a North Vietnamese Army battalion. Reacting instantly, Corporal Eades ran across the fire swept terrain to his defensive position and commenced delivering a heavy volume of accurate machine-gun fire upon the attacking force. Observing an enemy platoon attempting to penetrate the perimeter to his right, he quickly directed a deadly volume of fire at the onrushing enemy hordes, and although the enemy concentrated their fire at him, he steadfastly remained in his precarious position firing belt after belt of ammunition as the enemy rounds erupted around him. As the enemy closed within hand grenade range of his position, Corporal Eades stood up in the intense enemy fire to better observe them and fire his weapon. Although wounded by an enemy rocket round, he resolutely stood his ground and single-handedly drove off the advancing enemy force. By his bold initiative, intrepid fighting ability and loyal devotion to duty, Corporal Eades was instrumental in repulsing a numerically superior enemy force, thereby reflecting great credit upon himself and the Marine Corps and upholding the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.
Authority: Navy Department Board of Decorations and Medals
Home Town: San Diego, California

EBBERT, TERRY J.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Navy Cross to Terry J. Ebbert (0-91101), First Lieutenant, U.S. Marine Corps (Reserve), for extraordinary heroism in action against an armed enemy while serving as Commanding Officer of Company E, Second Battalion, Fifth Marines, FIRST Marine Division (Reinforced), Fleet Marine Force, in the Republic of Vietnam on 24 December 1966. When Company G was encircled by a Viet Cong force near the village of Phu Tay (1), First Lieutenant Ebbert's company was assigned the mission of conducting a relief operation to assist the beleaguered unit. After landing on the beach by assault boats, his company was entering the village when the point platoon came under heavy enemy machine gun, mortar, recoilless rifle and small arms fire. The platoon sustained several casualties and was unable to advance due to the intense enemy fire. With complete disregard for his own safety, First Lieutenant Ebbert courageously moved forward, under the observation and fire of the enemy, to evaluate the situation and lead the attack. Under his inspiring leadership, his unit quickly gained fire superiority and forced the enemy to withdraw from the area. He directed his company to resume its advance, but almost immediately, the point platoon was halted by intense automatic weapons fire and mortars from elements of a Viet Cong battalion. Once more, First Lieutenant Ebbert daringly moved to the front of his unit, directing return fire, rallying and encouraging his men, and supervising the evacuation of the wounded to a position of safety. Observing an opportunity to envelop the well entrenched enemy force, he aggressively led a squad of Marines across fifty meters of fire-swept, open terrain and flanked the enemy positions, forcing them to halt their firing and retreat. As he directed artillery fire on the Viet Cong force, First Lieutenant Ebbert was seriously wounded in the chest by enemy fire. But he steadfastly remained at his exposed vantage point, continuing to direct his company's efforts in inflicting heavy losses on the enemy, until he fell unconscious from his wounds. First Lieutenant Ebbert's daring initiative, indomitable fighting spirit, and loyal devotion to duty at great personal risk reflected great credit upon himself and were in keeping with the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and the United States Naval Service.
Authority: Navy Department Board of Decorations and Medals
Home Town: Chicago, Illinois

EDWARDS, CRAIG A.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Navy Cross to Craig A. Edwards (110222), First Lieutenant, U.S. Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism on 20 August 1970 while serving as Commanding Officer of Company H, Second Battalion, Seventh Marines, FIRST Marine Division (Reinforced), Fleet Marine Force, in connection with combat operations against enemy forces in the Republic of Vietnam. After leading a relief force to the site of a beleaguered combat patrol unit which had sustained three casualties, including the platoon commander, First Lieutenant Edwards braved the intense, hostile, automatic-weapons fire to move to a forward position. Here he observed four of his own men lying wounded in an area dangerously close to one of the enemy's machine-gun emplacements. Although enemy soldiers concentrated their fire on him as he raced toward the emplacement, he managed to hurl three grenades into the enemy position, destroying the emplacement along with its occupants. Pinned down by fire from another hostile position before he could administer first aid to his four wounded comrades, First Lieutenant Edwards, upon observing a grenade land in proximity to the casualties, succeeded in kicking it to one side and jumped in front of his companions to protect them from the blast. Despite a painful leg wound caused by fragments from the exploding grenade, he proceeded to hack a path to the river, returned to his position and, assisted by a Corpsman, carried the most seriously wounded man one hundred meters upstream in the face of enemy fire to a designated landing zone. He then returned with the Corpsman and carried a second casualty up the river to safety, following which he directed the evacuation of all remaining casualties before weakness from loss of blood forced his own removal to a medical facility. By his indomitable courage, determined fighting spirit, and selfless devotion to duty, First Lieutenant Edwards was directly instrumental in saving the lives of several of his fellow Marines, thereby upholding the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and the United States Naval Service.
Authority: Navy Department Board of Decorations and Medals
Home Town: Albuquerque, New Mexico

ESTRADA, MANUEL A.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Navy Cross to Manuel A. Estrada (2361066), Lance Corporal, U.S. Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism while serving as a Squad Leader with Company A, Third Reconnaissance Battalion, THIRD Marine Division (Reinforced), Fleet Marine Force, in the Republic of Vietnam, on 24 and 25 August 1968. Lance Corporal Estrada and his eight-man reconnaissance team were heli-lifted into enemy controlled territory near Con Thien and were proceeding across an open rice paddy when the point man encountered twelve North Vietnamese Army soldiers followed by a force estimated to be battalion size. Reacting instantly, the point man fired his weapon and killed three of the enemy. While the surprised North Vietnamese unit recovered from its momentary confusion, Lance Corporal Estrada rapidly deployed his men and adjusted supporting arms fire which, in coordination with the fire of his team, successfully held the determined North Vietnamese unit at bay. As a reaction force, sent to the relief of the beleaguered team, disembarked in a nearby landing zone, it was pinned down by a heavy volume of enemy mortar and automatic weapons fire and suffered several casualties. Skillfully shifting supporting artillery fire and the direction of his team's firepower, he enabled the relief force to join his team, and when the officer leading the infantrymen was severely wounded, Lance Corporal Estrada unhesitatingly assumed command of the combined forces, although he had been seriously injured during the early moments of the engagement. With the arrival of helicopters containing further reinforcements, he boldly stood in the hazardous area and utilized a strobe light to guide the aircraft to a landing. Relieved by an officer accompanying the new unit, Lance Corporal Estrada, twice, steadfastly refused medical evacuation and, ignoring his painful injury, crawled from one position to another, distributing ammunition and water and encouraging the men in their efforts to contain the enemy assault. Resolutely remaining with his team, he assisted in repulsing repeated attacks until the reconnaissance team was extracted the following day. By his courage, resolute determination and unfaltering devotion to duty he upheld the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and the United States Naval Service.
Authority: Navy Department Board of Decorations and Medals
Home Town: Phoenix, Arizona

*EVANS, RICHARD ALLEN, JR.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Navy Cross (Posthumously) to Richard Allen Evans, Jr. (2427562), Private First Class, U.S. Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism while serving as a Fire Team Leader with Company D, First Battalion, Fifth Marines, FIRST Marine Division (Reinforced), Fleet Marine Force, in connection with operations against the enemy in the Republic of Vietnam. On 29 August 1968, Private Evans was maneuvering his fire team toward known enemy positions when the Marines suddenly came under antitank rocket and automatic weapons fire from a well-entrenched North Vietnamese Army company. Although he was seriously wounded during the initial burst of fire, he resolutely refused medical attention for himself in order to continue leading his men against the enemy. Observing five North Vietnamese soldiers maneuvering to a position on his unit's flank, Private Evans quickly moved across the fire-swept terrain to a vantage point where he delivered a highly accurate fire that killed all five enemy soldiers. Wounded a second time by fire from another hostile emplacement, he realized that his team was in an untenable position. Concerned only for the welfare of his comrades, Private Evans directed his men to withdraw to a more defensible position and, ignoring his own painful injuries, selflessly remained behind providing covering fire for their movement. Continuing his gallant efforts in an attempt to ensure that his fellow Marines would reach a position of relative safety, he fearlessly rushed forward in a determined assault, firing his rifle into the hostile emplacement until he was mortally wounded by enemy machine-gun fire. His bold initiative and uncommon valor undoubtedly saved the lives of three of his fellow Marines. By his courage, intrepid fighting spirit, and selfless devotion to duty, Private Evans inspired all who observed him and sustained and enhanced the highest traditions of the United States Marine Corps and the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country.
Authority: Navy Department Board of Decorations and Medals
Home Town: Independence, Missouri

F

 

FAIRFIELD, RUPERT E., JR.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Navy Cross to Rupert E. Fairfield, Jr. (0-85242), Captain, U.S. Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism as a Copilot of a UH-1E Helicopter attached to Marine Observation Squadron SIX (VMO-6), Marine Aircraft Group SIXTEEN (MAG-16), First Marine Aircraft Wing, near Quang Ngai, Republic of Vietnam on 19 August 1967. While conducting a regularly assigned mission, Captain Fairfield's aircraft monitored a transmission giving the approximate location of four soldiers from a downed helicopter. The UH-1E diverted from its mission to this site and found the soldiers in the midst of an estimated thirty to forty Viet Cong, who were bayoneting and beating them with rifle butts. They began a series of low level attacks, and the Viet Cong scattered and withdrew to a tree line. Upon making a second low level pass, they observed one man raise his arm in a gesture for help. Immediately the helicopter landed on the beach between the men and the enemy, who were now firing furiously at the aircraft. Seeing that two men were unable to move a wounded man to the aircraft, Captain Fairfield exited the aircraft to go to their aid. As he stepped onto the ground, three Viet Cong appeared on top of a small sand dune, only ten feet from the aircraft. He quickly removed one of the machine guns from its mount and killed the enemy with a short burst of fire. Replacing the weapon, he drew his pistol and ran into the hail of fire to aid in carrying the wounded man to the aircraft. With all but one of the wounded men aboard, Captain Fairfield once again braved the enemy fire to race to the aid of the remaining soldier, only to find he had succumbed to his wounds. Returning to the aircraft, he leaped into the cockpit. The helicopter, being subjected to intense enemy fire and overloaded, was barely able to fly, as they made their way to a field hospital. By Captain Fairfield's bold initiative, indomitable fighting spirit and selfless devotion to duty, he was instrumental in saving the men's lives and thereby upheld the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and the United States Naval Service.
Authority: Navy Department Board of Decorations and Medals
Home Town: New Orleans, Louisiana

*FANTE, ROBERT GERALD
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Navy Cross (Posthumously) to Robert Gerald Fante (2175781), Corporal, U.S. Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism while serving as a squad leader with Company F, Second Battalion, Fifth Marines, FIRST Marine Division (Reinforced), Fleet Marine Force, in connection with operations against the enemy in the Republic of Vietnam. On 6 August 1968, while participating in a search and clear operation south of the Thu Ben River during Operation MARMELUKE THRUST II, Corporal Fante's platoon came under a heavy volume of small-arms fire from an estimated North Vietnamese Army company entrenched in a tree line. In the initial moments of the attack, Corporal Fante disregarded his own safety to pinpoint enemy positions and maneuver his men forward. When his squad became pinned down, he directed his grenadiers to fire into the tree line, effectively suppressing the hostile fire and enabling his men to advance. Subsequently pinpointing an enemy 75-mm. recoilless rifle position, Corporal Fante skillfully suppressed the fire with supporting arms, and then single-handed, he assaulted the hostile position, capturing the weapon and forcing the enemy soldiers to flee. Repeatedly exposing himself to hostile fire, he continued maneuvering his Marines through the fortified positions, destroying bunkers with hand grenades and boldly pursuing the fleeing enemy. When one of his men was seriously wounded, Corporal Fante unhesitatingly moved to his side and provided security while the Corpsman treated the Marine's wounds and evacuated him to a covered position. Alertly observing a camouflaged enemy bunker, he quickly attacked it with hand grenades, killing two North Vietnamese soldiers. As he was advancing across open terrain to attack another hostile fortification, Corporal Fante was mortally wounded by enemy automatic weapons fire. His heroic actions inspired all who observed him and saved numerous fellow Marines from possible death or serious injury. By his courage, superb leadership, and selfless devotion too duty, Corporal Fante upheld the highest traditions of the United States Marine Corps and the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country.
Authority: Navy Department Board of Decorations and Medals
Home Town: Roseville, Michigan

*FEDEROWSKI, ROBERT ALLAN
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Navy Cross (Posthumously) to Robert Allan Federowski (2204671), Corporal, U.S. Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism while serving as a Squad Leader with Company D, First Battalion, Fifth Marines, FIRST Marine Division (Reinforced), Fleet Marine Force, in connection with operations against the enemy in the Republic of Vietnam. On the evening of 24 May 1968, Corporal Federowski's unit had established an ambush on a suspected enemy infiltration route in Thua Thien Province and became heavily engaged with a numerically superior North Vietnamese Army force. Ignoring the hostile small-arms fire and B-40 rockets impacting around him, Corporal Federowski boldly moved about the hazardous terrain, shouting words of encouragement to his men and skillfully directing their fire. Suddenly, an enemy hand grenade landed near him and several other Marines. With complete disregard for his own safety, Corporal Federowski fearlessly placed himself between the grenade and his comrades. As he attempted to hurl it away from his position, the grenade detonated, and he was mortally wounded. His bold initiative and sincere concern for the welfare of his comrades inspired all who observed him and saved the lives of several fellow Marines. By his courage, aggressive fighting spirit, and selfless devotion to duty, Corporal Federowski upheld the highest traditions of the United States Marine Corps and the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country.
Authority: Navy Department Board of Decorations and Medals
Home Town: Lansing, Illinois

FEERRAR, DONALD L.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Navy Cross to Donald L. Feerrar (2252390), Lance Corporal [then Private First Class], U.S. Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism as a rocket ammunition man with Company G, Second Battalion, First Marines, FIRST Marine Division (Reinforced), Fleet Marine Force, in the Republic of Vietnam on 20 March 1967. A squad of the first platoon was positioned in a night ambush against the communist insurgent forces in Quang Nam Province in the early morning hours. Lance Corporal Feerrar was with two other Marines in a camouflaged position. During the night, an enemy grenade was hurled into his position, hitting one of his comrades on the arm. Instantly, Lance Corporal Feerrar gave the alarm and knocked the other Marine to the ground. He then grasped the deadly bomb, threw it out of the position and at the same instant threw himself on the Marine he had knocked out of the way, covering the Marine's body with his own. The enemy grenade exploded harmlessly several meters away. Through his extraordinary initiative and inspiring valor in the face of almost certain death, Lance Corporal Feerrar saved his comrades from injury and possible loss of life, thereby reflecting great credit upon himself and upholding the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and the United States Naval Service.
Authority: Navy Department Board of Decorations and Medals
Home Town: Baltimore, Maryland

FELTON, SAMUEL L., JR.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Navy Cross to Samuel L. Felton, Jr. (2479014), Private First Class, U.S. Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism while serving as a Fire Team Leader with Company C, First Battalion, Fifth Marines, FIRST Marine Division (Reinforced), Fleet Marine Force, in connection with combat operations against the enemy in the Republic of Vietnam. Early on the morning of 11 June 1969, Company C was established in a battalion night defensive perimeter two miles west of An Hoa Combat Base when its sector came under a heavy volume of rocket, mortar, recoilless rifle, and automatic-weapons fire followed by a determined assault by an estimated 100 North Vietnamese Army soldiers. When communications with a three-man listening post seventy-five meters forward of the perimeter were lost, Private First Class Felton established voice contact and learned that all three Marines were wounded and unable to return to the perimeter unassisted. With resolute determination, he left his fighting hole and although wounded by enemy fire, continued across the open terrain until he reached the beleaguered Marines. After administering first aid and ensuring that no equipment or ordnance was left behind, he provided covering fire as he directed the two least seriously wounded men across the hazardous area to the company lines. Despite his weakened condition from loss of blood, Private First Class Felton began to carry the most seriously injured Marine through the knee-deep mud and water of the rice paddy. Suddenly two hostile soldiers jumped in front of him, blocking his chance to return to friendly lines. Reacting instantly, he fired his M-16 rifle with one hand while supporting the wounded Marine with his injured arm, killing both of the enemy, and fearlessly continued his Herculean efforts until he delivered his wounded comrade to the battalion aid station. He then returned to the perimeter and continued fighting the attacking force until the enemy was repulsed. His heroic actions and bold fighting spirit inspired all who observed him and were instrumental in saving the lives of several fellow Marines. By his courage, daring initiative, and unwavering devotion to duty in the face of great personal danger, Private First Class Felton upheld the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and the United States Naval Service.
Authority: Navy Department Board of Decorations and Medals
Home Town: Cleveland, Ohio

*FINLEY, MICHAEL PAUL
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Navy Cross (Posthumously) to Michael Paul Finley (2204950), Lance Corporal, U.S. Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism while serving as a Grenadier with First Platoon, Company A, First Battalion, Fourth Marines, THIRD Marine Division (Reinforced), Fleet Marine Force, at Con Thien, Quang Tri Province, Republic of Vietnam, on 8 May 1967. Two squads from the First Platoon were maneuvering across an open strip to stop the enemy penetration of the perimeter at Con Thien when they were pinned down by intense fire from a numerically superior North Vietnamese Army force in a revetment behind two burning amphibious tractors. Realizing that the squad was taking heavy casualties, Lance Corporal Finley, with complete disregard for his own personal safety, leaped from his covered position and accurately fired two M-79 grenades at the enemy position. Although he was wounded, he scored two direct hits on an enemy machine gun, destroying it and killing its crew. Once again, with complete disregard for his own safety, he lunged forward through a hail of enemy fire to give aid to a wounded Marine lying in the open. After giving first aid to the wounded Marine, he noticed that his squad leader was also seriously wounded. Again he fearlessly exposed himself to give assistance to his squad leader, but was mortally wounded. By his daring initiative, valiant fighting spirit and selfless devotion to duty in the face of insurmountable odds, Lance Corporal Finley was responsible in a great measure for saving many of his comrades and thereby upheld the highest traditions of the United States Marine Corps and the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country.
Authority: Navy Department Board of Decorations and Medals
Home Town: Big Rock, Illinois

*FISHER, THOMAS WILLIAM
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Navy Cross (Posthumously) to Thomas William Fisher (2244800), Lance Corporal, U.S. Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism while serving as a Fire Team Leader with Company M, Third Battalion, Fifth Marines, FIRST Marine Division (Reinforced), Fleet Marine Force, in the Republic of Vietnam on 4 September 1967. While advancing toward Hill 63 in Quang Tin Province during Operation SWIFT, Lance Corporal Fisher's platoon came under heavy mortar, machine-gun and small-arms fire from well-entrenched elements of the North Vietnamese Army and was temporarily pinned down. In the initial moments of the vicious attack, he fearlessly exposed himself to enemy fire to encourage and direct his fire team and observe enemy positions. Pinpointing an enemy automatic weapon, he directed accurate rifle fire into the position, silencing the weapon. When another automatic weapon immediately opened fire on his team's position he boldly stood up in full view of the enemy and quieted the weapon with a rapid burst of rifle fire before an enemy round damaged his rifle and wounded him in the arm. Then, despite the painful wound and lack of a weapon, Lance Corporal Fisher daringly ran through a barrage of enemy fire to assist a companion fire team, pinned down in an extremely hazardous position. Upon learning that a seriously wounded Marine was lying in an exposed area approximately forty meters from the left flank, he courageously braved concentrated fire in an attempt to rescue the disabled man. Undaunted by painful wounds, Lance Corporal Fisher crawled forward, bravely continuing to advance until he was wounded again. Even then, when a Marine reached his side to assist him, he refused aid, urging the man to aid the wounded man whom he so courageously had tried to save. Although he ultimately succumbed to his multiple wounds, he inspired all who observed him to heroic endeavor in repulsing the enemy attack. By his extraordinary courage, bold initiative and selfless devotion to duty, Lance Corporal Fisher upheld the highest traditions of the United States Marine Corps and the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country.
Authority: Navy Department Board of Decorations and Medals
Home Town: Allentown, Pennsylvania

*FLOREN, JIMMY ERIK
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Navy Cross (Posthumously) to Jimmy Erik Floren (2325565), Corporal, U.S. Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism while serving as a Fire Team Leader with Company H, Second Battalion, Fifth Marines, FIRST Marine Division (Reinforced), Fleet Marine Force, in operations against the enemy in the Republic of Vietnam on 6 November 1967. During Operation ESSEX, near Quang Duc, Quang Nam Province, Corporal Floren's company was taken under devastating small-arms, automatic weapons and mortar fire from a well-entrenched and numerically superior enemy force. During the initial burst of enemy fire, a Marine was wounded and fell in an open rice paddy, fifteen meters from an enemy machine gun emplacement. Quickly deploying his men, and with complete disregard for his own safety, Corporal Floren crawled across the fire swept terrain to the side of the injured man and moved him to a position of relative safety behind a rice paddy dike. Observing that all the members of a machine gun team were wounded and unable to operate the weapon, he moved forward, seized the weapon and began delivering intense fire in the enemy positions. Although in an exposed position, he continued to fire the weapon until it was rendered useless by enemy machine gun fire, which wounded him. Ignoring his wound, he seized an M-79 Grenade Launcher from a wounded Marine and fearlessly moved to a vantage point on top of a paddy dike from which he delivered accurate fire upon the enemy emplacements, until he was mortally wounded. By his bold initiative, gallant fighting spirit and loyal devotion to duty, Corporal Floren reflected great credit upon himself and the United States Marine Corps and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country.
Authority: Navy Department Board of Decorations and Medals
Home Town: Klamath Falls, Oregon

FOWLER, EARL W.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Navy Cross to Earl W. Fowler (1984379), Corporal, U.S. Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism while serving as a Squad Leader with Company C, First Battalion, Seventh Marines, FIRST Marine Division (Reinforced), Fleet Marine Force, in action against insurgent communist forces (Viet Cong) in the Republic of Vietnam on 28 March 1966. During Operation INDIANA, Corporal Fowler's platoon was engaged in an assault on a hostile village in Quang Ngai Province. The intense volume of enemy machine-gun and automatic weapons fire soon inflicted heavy Marine casualties and halted the advance of the two attacking squads. Quickly appraising the situation, Corporal Fowler skillfully deployed his squad to provide covering fire and, with complete disregard for his own safety, courageously moved across an open field where three wounded Marines lay helpless only about ten yards from a Viet Cong machine gun bunker. As he reached the position of his stricken comrades, he was knocked to the ground by a barrage of enemy concussion grenades. Undaunted, he picked himself up and took the Viet Cong under fire with his M-79, killing and wounding several and forcing the remainder to withdraw temporarily. As he was administering medical aid to the casualties, the Viet Cong returned. Again Corporal Fowler drove them back, killing two with his pistol at a distance of five feet. After helping to carry the wounded men to a covered position, he replenished his supply of ammunition and re-crossed the fire-torn field, directing covering fire while other casualties were withdrawn. Although he was wounded in his valiant effort, he stalwartly refused evacuation and remained with his squad through the night, helping to defend the perimeter. By his indomitable fighting spirit and determination to aid his comrades at the risk of his own life, Corporal Fowler upheld the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and the United States Naval Service.
Authority: Navy Department Board of Decorations and Medals
Home Town: Albuquerque, New Mexico

*FREDERICK, JOHN WILLIAM, JR. (POW)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Navy Cross (Posthumously) to John William Frederick, Jr. (333240838), Chief Warrant Officer, U.S. Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism while interned as a Prisoner of War in Southeast Asia from June 1967 to August 1968. During this period, Chief Warrant Officer Frederick distinguished himself by his relentless rejection of any attempts to gain his cooperation or assistance. His steadfast resistance in the face of grave personal danger was an inspiration to other Prisoners of War who observed him. As a result of his dogged resistance, in spite of the fury and relentless cruelty of his captors, fellow prisoners were able to emulate his highly professional example and to find additional personal strength by which to resist interrogation and indoctrination. As a hard-core resister, and with full knowledge of the serious personal hazards to his life, Chief Warrant Officer Frederick personified leadership, bravery, and resistance far beyond that which could reasonably be expected. By his loyalty, perseverance, and courageous actions, Chief Warrant Officer Frederick upheld the highest traditions of the United States Marine Corps and the United States Naval Service.
Authority: Navy Department Board of Decorations and Medals
Home Town: Manito, Illinois

*FRYMAN, ROY ALLEN
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Navy Cross to Roy Allen Fryman (1356690), Staff Sergeant, U.S. Marine Corps (Reserve), for extraordinary heroism on 29 April 1968 as a Platoon Commander, First Force Reconnaissance Battalion, FIRST Marine Division (Reinforced), Fleet Marine Force, during operations against enemy aggressor forces in the Republic of Vietnam. While leading a long-range reconnaissance patrol through the southeastern portion of Phu Loc Valley, Thua Thien Province, Sergeant Fryman, hearing enemy troops approaching along the trail leading to the patrol's position, immediately organized and triggered an ambush, firing bursts from his automatic rifle which killed one of the hostile soldiers, while the patrol killed another. During this brief fire fight, an enemy grenade landed in the position occupied by Sergeant Fryman and three companions. He quickly picked up the deadly missile and hurled it back at the enemy, killing another hostile soldier. Although suffering a slight concussion from the explosion, Sergeant Fryman steadfastly refused medical aid and moved his patrol 100 meters south of the trail where he deployed three-man ambush teams. Subsequently, he and his men succeeded in killing three more enemy troops and wounding two. Following this action, Sergeant Fryman prepared a landing zone for a medical helicopter in order to evacuate the wounded prisoners. He then established a defense perimeter and remained at the scene with the point man to halt the advance of a numerically superior enemy force while the rest of the unit withdrew from the area. As a result of Sergeant Fryman's exceptional knowledge of patrol techniques and tactics, his patrol accomplished its hazardous mission without a single Marine casualty. His great personal valor, aggressive leadership, and unfaltering devotion to duty throughout these actions reflect the highest credit upon himself, the Marine Corps, and the United States Naval Service.
Authority: Navy Department Board of Decorations and Medals
Home Town: Paris, Kentucky

*FULLER, JOHN LUTHER, JR.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Navy Cross (Posthumously) to John Luther Fuller, Jr. (0-94257), Second Lieutenant, U.S. Marine Corps (Reserve), for extraordinary heroism in action against insurgent communist (Viet Cong) forces while serving as Platoon Leader, Third Platoon, Company E, Second Battalion, Fifth Marines, FIRST Marine Division (Reinforced), Fleet Marine Force, on 23 March 1967. During Operation NEW CASTLE, Second Lieutenant Fuller's platoon was maneuvering toward the fortified village of Dai Khuong 1, Quang Nam Province, when they were undertaken by intense small arms, mortar and recoilless rifle fire from a well-entrenched enemy force. Moving with the lead squad, Second Lieutenant Fuller was wounded by the initial burst of fire. Unmindful of his wound, he stationed himself to direct fire on the advancing enemy and while positioning and encouraging his men, he was struck again by enemy fire. Although suffering from a severe loss of blood he courageously began maneuvering toward the radio position of the platoon, with the intention of directing artillery fire on the enemy, knowing it would save the lives of the other Marines. In his advance toward the radio, he received his fatal wound; however, his profound sense of duty and determination enabled him to reach the radio, but he lost consciousness and subsequently died of his wounds while attempting to call in the artillery fire. Inspired by his apparent calm, valiant fighting spirit and dynamic leadership, his Marines went on to defeat the Viet Cong in this fierce battle. Second Lieutenant Fuller's daring initiative and his undying devotion to duty reflected great credit upon himself and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Marine Corps and the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country.
Authority: Navy Department Board of Decorations and Medals
Home Town: Atlanta, Georgia

G

 

*GALBREATH, BOBBY FRANK
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Navy Cross (Posthumously) to Bobby Frank Galbreath (0-70303), Captain, U.S. Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism while serving as a Pilot with Marine Observation Squadron SIX (VMO-6), in the Republic of Vietnam on 16 February 1968. Captain Galbreath launched as Wingman in a flight of two armed UH-1E helicopters diverted to support the emergency extraction of an eight-man reconnaissance team which was heavily engaged with a numerically superior North Vietnamese Army force six miles northwest of Dong Ha. Arriving over the designated area, he immediately initiated his attack and made repeated strafing runs on the enemy positions. Although five Marines had been recovered, subsequent attempts to rescue the remaining men failed due to a heavy volume of ground fire which had seriously damaged three helicopters. Realizing the seriousness of the situation, Captain Galbreath volunteered to evacuate the surrounded men. Fully aware of the extreme danger to himself and his crew, he unhesitatingly commenced his approach, but was forced to abandon the landing when his aircraft sustained several hits. Completely disregarding his own safety, he initiated his second approach and skillfully maneuvered his aircraft through the hostile fire into the landing zone. Ignoring the intense fire which was striking his aircraft, he remained in the fire swept area while the men embarked. Lifting from the hazardous zone, his helicopter was struck by a burst of enemy fire and crashed, mortally wounding Captain Galbreath. By his courage, bold initiative and selfless devotion to duty, he inspired all who served with him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Marine Corps and the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country.
Authority: Navy Department Board of Decorations and Medals
Home Town: Amarillo, Texas

*GALE, ALVIN RICHARD
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Navy Cross (Posthumously) to Alvin Richard Gale (2393859), Private First Class, U.S. Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism while serving as a Radio Operator with Company G, Second Battalion, Twenty-Sixth Marines, Ninth Marine Amphibious Brigade, III Marine Amphibious Force, in the Republic of South Vietnam on 28 January 1969. During Operation LINN RIVER, the Second Platoon of Company G was patrolling along a stream in Quang Nam Province when the Marines came under a heavy volume of fire from hostile soldiers occupying well-concealed emplacements and, after sustaining several casualties, deployed to the marginal shelter of a bomb crater. Observing that the platoon leader was among the casualties, Private First Class Gale volunteered to accompany his platoon commander and a fire team and fearlessly went to the aid of the beleaguered unit. Noting that the casualties were lying in an unprotected area near the hostile emplacements and would have to be evacuated prior to the utilization of supporting artillery fire, he unhesitatingly accompanied his companions across the fire-swept terrain and effected the rescue of three of the injured men. As he, with his platoon commander, again boldly entered the enemy kill zone and approached to within five meters of the hostile soldiers to evacuate the remaining helpless Marine, the two men came under intense fire which fatally wounded the platoon commander. Determined to save his injured comrade and, if possible, retrieve the officer, Private First Class Gale immediately delivered suppressive fire on the North Vietnamese position and was attempting to gain fire supremacy, when he was mortally wounded. By his courage, selfless concern for his fellowmen and unwavering devotion to duty, Private First Class Gale upheld the finest traditions of the United States Marine Corps and the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country.
Authority: Navy Department Board of Decorations and Medals
Home Town: Hyde Park, Massachusetts

GALLAGHER, PATRICK
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Navy Cross to Patrick Gallagher (2170557), Lance Corporal, U.S. Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism as an ammunition carrier in a machine-gun team with Company H, Second Battalion, Fourth Marines, THIRD Marine Division (Reinforced), Fleet Marine Force, near Cam Lo, Republic of Vietnam, in the early morning of 18 July 1966. The company was set in defensive positions at 0145, when enemy soldiers who had infiltrated the area threw a grenade into the position which Lance Corporal Gallagher and three other Marines were manning. Lance Corporal Gallagher, awake and displaying keen presence of mind, immediately kicked the grenade out of the position where it exploded at a safe distance. Another enemy grenade followed and landed in the position between two of his comrades. Without hesitation, in a valiant act of self-sacrifice, Lance Corporal Gallagher threw himself upon the deadly grenade in order to absorb the explosion and save the lives of his comrades. The other three Marines moved to safety while two other grenades landed in the position and exploded, miraculously injuring no one. Lance Corporal Gallagher's Squad Leader then ordered him to throw the grenade into the nearby river where it exploded upon hitting the water. Through his extraordinary heroism and inspiring valor in the face of almost certain death, he saved his comrades from probable injury and possible loss of life. His daring actions were in keeping with the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and the United States Naval Service.
Authority: Navy Department Board of Decorations and Medals
Home Town: Lynnbrook, New York

*GAUTHIER, BRIAN JAMES
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Navy Cross (Posthumously) to Brian James Gauthier (2007664), Corporal, U.S. Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism while serving as a Marine Rifle Squad Leader with Company A, First Battalion, Third Marines, THIRD Marine Division (Reinforced), Fleet Marine Force, in the Republic of Vietnam during the early morning of 11 July 1965. While moving to an ambush position, eight miles southwest of DaNang, Corporal Gauthier's squad suffered heavy casualties from the detonation of an enemy mine and subsequent secondary explosions. Shortly thereafter his unit came under Viet Cong fire from several directions. Although wounded by the initial blast, he persistently refused medical aid until all of the casualties had been treated, meanwhile reorganizing his squad, establishing a defensive perimeter around the wounded, and directing fire against the enemy. During this time a helicopter attempted to evacuate the casualties but was driven off by intensive enemy machine gun fire. For a period of over two hours he continued to shout encouragement and direction to his men until he succumbed to his wounds. Corporal Gauthier's gallant leadership, indomitable fighting spirit, and inspiring devotion to duty reflected great credit upon himself and the United States Marine Corps and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country.
Authority: Navy Department Board of Decorations and Medals
Home Town: Mansura, Louisiana

*GETLIN, MICHAEL PETER
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Navy Cross (Posthumously) to Michael Peter Getlin (0-86661), Captain, U.S. Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism as Commanding Officer, Company I, Third Battalion, Ninth Marines, THIRD Marine Division (Reinforced), Fleet Marine Force, in the Republic of Vietnam on 30 March 1967. The company was engaged in establishing platoon night ambush sites against communist insurgent forces in Quang Tri Province when all elements became engaged simultaneously, and the company's command group and a small security element were attacked by a North Vietnamese reinforced company utilizing heavy automatic weapons fire and mortar barrages. Captain Getlin, despite multiple shrapnel and gunshot wounds, while under constant mortar and small-arms fire, remained on the exposed forward slope of the hill where he calmly called in artillery fire and directed helicopter strikes on the advancing enemy. When the attack built to the point of overrunning the Marine position, Captain Getlin moved to the most critical position and delivered devastating shotgun fire into the assaulting enemy. The barrel of his weapon split due to the rate of fire. With complete disregard for the danger involved, he reloaded and continued to fire, personally killing at least six enemy soldiers. Realizing that the position was not tenable, Captain Getlin directed his men to move to a better position while he covered their move. At this time three grenades fell within his immediate position. He threw one grenade back at the enemy and was mortally wounded attempting to retrieve the others. As a result of his professional ability, extraordinary courage, and stirring example, the Marines gained the new position and repulsed the enemy attack of over sixty North Vietnamese. Captain Getlin's great personal valor reflected the highest credit upon himself and the United States Marine Corps and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country.
Authority: Navy Department Board of Decorations and Medals
Home Town: La Grange, Illinois

GIBSON, GEORGE R.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Navy Cross to George R. Gibson (2010487), Corporal, U.S. Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism as an Automatic Rifleman while serving with the Second Platoon, Company B, Second Battalion, Fourth Marines, THIRD Marine Division (Reinforced), Fleet Marine Force, during Operation PRAIRIE in Vietnam on 8 August 1966. His platoon was being evacuated by helicopter from an area northwest of Cam Lo, Quang Tri Province, when it was attacked by North Vietnamese Army units utilizing automatic weapons fire and barrages of hand grenades. The half of the platoon that had not been successfully evacuated was quickly surrounded. Casualties mounted as enemy forces in reinforced company strength threatened to overrun the friendly positions. Corporal Gibson observed a Marine, wounded and helpless, almost within the grasp of the advancing enemy. He immediately, with complete disregard for his own safety, left his covered position and exposed himself to murderous enemy fire to provide fire support for the evacuation of the wounded man. The Platoon Commander rallied the platoon for a counter-attack and Corporal Gibson leaped from protective cover and charged into the enemy fire. Although painfully wounded by a grenade, he continued to press the attack until the original positions had been retaken. Knowing their only chance to hold was to obtain more ammunition, he unhesitatingly crossed twenty-five meters of fire-swept terrain and returned with the badly needed ammunition. Observing a machine gun that was not manned, Corporal Gibson immediately put it into action and, disregarding barrages of enemy grenades and accurate small-arms fire directed at him, courageously stood his ground until the North Vietnamese withdrew to reorganize for another attack. The second attack was accompanied by vicious automatic-weapons fire and grenades, and despite being painfully wounded again by machine gun fire, he continued to fight, killing six additional enemy. The North Vietnamese set up a machine gun that threatened to enfilade the Marine position. Corporal Gibson moved out on the fire-swept slope in full view of the enemy, flanked the weapon, and single- handedly knocked it out, killing its crew. His courageous initiative, indomitable fighting spirit and unselfish devotion to duty were contributing factors in the successful removal of the wounded and in saving the lives of many of his comrades. His great personal valor reflected the highest credit upon himself, the Marine Corps and the United States Naval Service.
Authority: Navy Department Board of Decorations and Medals
Home Town: Pasadena, Texas

GILLELAND, RICHARD M.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Navy Cross to Richard M. Gilleland (2260688), Sergeant, U.S. Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism while serving as a Platoon Sergeant with Company M, Third Battalion, Seventh Marines, FIRST Marine Division (Reinforced), Fleet Marine Force, in connection with combat operations against the enemy in the Republic of Vietnam. On 23 February 1969, the Second Platoon of Company M was dispatched to the Bo Ban area of Hieu Due District in Quang Nam Province to assist a squad from another platoon, which had become heavily engaged with a well-entrenched North Vietnamese Army battalion. Having reached their objective, the Marines commenced a reconnaissance in force across a rice paddy covered with heavy grass. Unhesitatingly leading the nearest squad, Sergeant Gilleland was immediately engaged in fierce hand-to-hand combat with hostile soldiers who had been concealed in the tall grass. He inspired his men by his example, and during the initial moments of the fierce engagement, the Marines killed twelve hostile soldiers in fierce close combat. After pausing momentarily to allow fixed-wing strikes on the enemy, Sergeant Gilleland initiated another aggressive assault enabling his men to force the North Vietnamese soldiers back into concealed areas. When the Marines approached within a few meters of the hostile emplacements they sustained a number of casualties, and Sergeant Gilleland valiantly crossed the fire-swept area on six separate occasions to lead the wounded men to places of relative security, thereby saving their lives. His heroic and determined efforts inspired all who observed him and were instrumental in his platoon's accounting for thirty-six hostile soldiers killed and vast quantities of enemy weapons and equipment captured. By his courage, bold initiative, and unwavering devotion to duty in the face of grave personal danger, Sergeant Gilleland upheld the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and the United States Naval Service.
Authority: Navy Department Board of Decorations and Medals
Home Town: Nashville, Tennessee

*GILLINGHAM, RICHARD KIRK
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Navy Cross (Posthumously) to Richard Kirk Gillingham (2118093), Corporal, U.S. Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism in connection with operations against enemy forces while serving as a Squad Leader with Company H, Second Battalion, Ninth Marines, THIRD Marine Division (Reinforced), Fleet Marine Force, in the Republic of Vietnam on 19 May 1967. While on a search and destroy operation in Quang Tri Province, Corporal Gillingham's squad was taken under heavy small arms and automatic weapons fire. In the initial burst of fire, one of his men was seriously wounded and unable to move from his exposed position. With complete disregard for his own safety, Corporal Gillingham rushed into the open terrain to administer aid to the fallen Marine, who was twenty meters away. Although wounded three times, he courageously persisted in his efforts until he had moved his wounded fellow Marine to a secure position. While heroically attempting to return to his squad, he succumbed to his grievous wounds. By his outstanding courage, exceptional fortitude and valiant fighting spirit, Corporal Gillingham served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Marine Corps and the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country.
Authority: Navy Department Board of Decorations and Medals
Home Town: Valatie, New York

GOMEZ, ERNESTO
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Navy Cross to Ernesto Gomez (2151708), Lance Corporal, U.S. Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism while serving with Marine Medium Helicopter Squadron TWO HUNDRED SIXTY-TWO (HMM-262), Marine Aircraft Group SIXTEEN, First Marine Aircraft Wing, in connection with operations against the enemy in the Republic of Vietnam. On 25 January 1968, Corporal Gomez was the Crew Chief aboard a CH-46 transport helicopter assigned an emergency medical evacuation mission on Hill 881 near the Khe Sanh Combat Base. The pilot proceeded to the designated area and landed in the zone as two Marines began leading a casualty, whose head and eyes were covered with bandages, toward the helicopter. When the entire landing zone was subjected to intense enemy fire, the two men were forced to drop to the ground. Observing the blindfolded casualty attempting to reach the aircraft unassisted, Corporal Gomez unhesitatingly left the helicopter and rushed across 25 meters of fire-swept terrain to the side of the injured man. Quickly pulling the Marine to the ground, he selflessly used his own body to shield his comrade from the hostile fire impacting around them, and as the enemy fire continued, he took cover with the casualty in a nearby rocket crater. Corporal Gomez remained in this exposed area until another crew member rushed to his assistance. Then the two Marines, protecting their wounded comrade from further injury, carried him to the helicopter. The Pilot was quickly informed that the injured Marine was aboard, and the aircraft lifted from the hazardous area for the medical facility at Khe Sanh. Corporal Gomez's heroic actions were instrumental in saving his companion's life and inspired all who observed him. By his courage, selfless concern for the safety of his fellow Marine, and unswerving devotion to duty at great personal risk, he upheld the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and the United States Naval Service.
Authority: Navy Department Board of Decorations and Medals
Home Town: Pasadena, California

GONZALES, DANIEL G.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Navy Cross to Daniel G. Gonzales (2126237), Corporal, U.S. Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism while serving as a 60-mm. mortar section leader with Company B, First Battalion, Seventh Marines, FIRST Marine Division (Reinforced), Fleet Marine Force, in connection with combat operations against the enemy in the Republic of Vietnam. In the early morning hours of 7 June 1969, Corporal Gonzales was stationed in Quang Nam Province at a company patrol base which was being defended by one platoon and his mortar section. Suddenly, the position was attacked by a determined North Vietnamese Army force utilizing automatic weapons and rocket propelled grenades, which either killed or wounded all of the Marines in the western defensive sector except Corporal Gonzales. Realizing the need for drastic action to prevent the overrunning of the command group, he fearlessly left his covered emplacement, and armed only with a pistol, utilized the scant natural cover available as he assaulted the enemy. Repeatedly exposing himself to the intense hostile fire to accurately fire his pistol, he boldly ran forward alone, killing three enemy soldiers and forcing the remainder to retreat. He then continued to pursue the hostile soldiers by fire until other Marines came to his assistance. His heroic actions and determined efforts prevented the death of his injured companions and the capture of a 60-mm. mortar. By his courage, bold initiative, and unwavering devotion to duty in the face of grave personal danger, Corporal Gonzales upheld the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and the United States Naval Service.
Authority: Navy Department Board of Decorations and Medals
Home Town: Corpus Christi, Texas

*GOODSELL, WILLIAM JOSEPH
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Navy Cross (Posthumously) to William Joseph Goodsell (0-55282), Major, U.S. Marine Corps (Reserve), for extraordinary heroism while serving with Marine Observation Squadron SIX (VMO-6), Marine Aircraft Group SIXTEEN, First Marine Aircraft Wing, in the Republic of Vietnam on 16 June 1966. Serving as Tactical Air Coordinator (Airborne) in an armed UH-1F helicopter, Major Goodsell made repeated rocket and machine gun attacks against an enemy battalion that had encircled and trapped a Marine reconnaissance unit. When a relieving force was airlifted into the battle, he guided the transport helicopters to the landing zone and delivered such devastating attacks on the enemy positions that only one aircraft in the assault force was struck by hostile fire. He then proceeded to fly dangerously low to seek out enemy positions and aid the assault force in their rescue of the beleaguered reconnaissance unit. When a juncture of the units was accomplished, he guided the medical evacuation helicopters to the friendly positions where eighteen wounded Marines lay waiting. Realizing the necessity to accurately mark the Marine positions because of the close proximity of the enemy, he courageously elected to fly very low and slow over the position to mark it with a smoke grenade. As his mark landed directly on target, he was taken under fire by several automatic weapons positions and although mortally wounded he maintained control of his aircraft until relieved by his copilot. By his bravery and fearless devotion to duty, Major Goodsell reflected great credit upon himself and the United States Marine Corps and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life in the cause of freedom.
Authority: Navy Department Board of Decorations and Medals
Home Town: Seattle, Washington

GRAY, GEORGE E.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Navy Cross to George E. Gray (2259206), Lance Corporal [then Private First Class], U.S. Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism while serving as an anti-tank assaultman with Company E, Second Battalion, Ninth Marines, THIRD Marine Division (Reinforced), Fleet Marine Force, in connection with operations against the enemy in the Republic of Vietnam. On 2 February 1968, Company E was advancing to seize a hill in Quang Tri Province overlooking National Route Nine to prevent the enemy from interdicting the road. Suddenly, Lance Corporal Gray's platoon came under heavy fire from mutually supporting fortified North Vietnamese Army positions on the hill, pinning down the platoon and inflicting several casualties. Observing an enemy mortar emplacement, he disregarded his own safety as he repeatedly exposed himself to hostile fire in order to bring effective fire to bear against the North Vietnamese position. On three separate occasions, he was wounded as he fired his antitank rocket weapon, however he ignored his painful wounds and refused medical attention for himself. Having expended his rocket ammunition, Corporal Gray obtained an M-16 rifle and began delivering a heavy volume of accurate fire against the enemy. When he observed a wounded Marine lying in an area exposed to hostile fire, he ran across the fire-swept area to the side of his fallen comrade, carried him to safety and began administering first aid. After he was joined by two other Marines who assisted in providing medical treatment to the wounded man, he heard the sound of an incoming enemy mortar round and, reacting instantly, pushed his two companions to the ground and covered the injured man with his own body. Although severely wounded by fragments from the exploding round, Corporal Gray successfully protected his fellow Marine from sustaining further injury. Still refusing medical attention for himself even though he was again wounded by enemy fire, he continued to aggressively engage the enemy until the critical phase of the battle was over. By his steadfast courage, intrepid fighting spirit and selfless devotion to duty at great personal risk, Corporal Gray inspired all those who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and the United States Naval Service.
Authority: Navy Department Board of Decorations and Medals
Home Town: Shreveport, Louisiana

GREEN, JOHN S.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Navy Cross to John S. Green (1275527), Gunnery Sergeant, U.S. Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism in action against enemy forces while serving as Company Gunnery Sergeant, Company F, Second Battalion, Fifth Marines, FIRST Marine Division (Reinforced), Fleet Marine Force, in the Republic of Vietnam on 2 June 1967. During Operation UNION II, Company F came under intense enemy small arms, automatic weapons and mortar fire from a well entrenched enemy force and was temporarily halted. Gunnery Sergeant Green, with complete disregard for his own safety, led a frontal assault against the enemy positions. Leading his men across 800 meters of open, fire-swept rice paddy, he quickly overran the Viet Cong machine gun position and personally accounted for ten enemy killed. After seizing the objective, he immediately established a hasty defense and began redistributing ammunition to his men. He fearlessly braved the intense enemy fire by exposing himself in carrying wounded to positions of relative safety. By his daring initiative, valiant fighting spirit and selfless devotion to duty in the face of insurmountable odds, Gunnery Sergeant Green was responsible in great measure for saving many of his comrades and thereby upheld the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and the United States Naval Service.
Authority: Navy Department Board of Decorations and Medals
Home Town: Waco, Texas

GREEN, MAURICE O. V.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Navy Cross to Maurice O. V. Green (103516), First Lieutenant, U.S. Marine Corps (Reserve), for extraordinary heroism while serving as the Intelligence Officer of the First Battalion, Fifth Marines, FIRST Marine Division (Reinforced), Fleet Marine Force, in the Republic of Vietnam on 27 October 1968. First Lieutenant Green traveled to the Company D Command Post in Quang Nam Province to interrogate two North Vietnamese Army prisoners. During the night, the Marine perimeter was breached by an enemy engineer unit hurling satchel charges throughout the position. Simultaneously, a large North Vietnamese force initiated a savage attack employing mortars, small arms, automatic weapons and antitank rockets. Alertly observing the commanding officer among the seriously wounded, First Lieutenant Green unhesitatingly assumed command of the company and repeatedly exposed himself to the continuous hail of enemy fire as he began rallying the Marine defenders. Completely disregarding his own safety, he fearlessly moved about the fire-swept terrain to each Marine position, shouting words of encouragement to the men and directing their fire at the hostile soldiers. Ignoring the enemy rounds impacting near him, he swiftly retrieved a radio from a seriously injured radio operator and boldly adjusted supporting arms fire on the attackers with pinpoint accuracy, forcing them to withdraw in panic and confusion. Rapidly assessing the turn of events, First Lieutenant Green courageously mounted and skillfully directed a determined counterattack in pursuit of the fleeing enemy soldiers while continuing to direct effective supporting arms fire on them. After contact had been broken with the enemy, he ensured that the wounded were medically treated and made arrangements for their evacuation. His daring initiative and heroic efforts inspired all who served with him and were instrumental in his company's accounting for eight hostile soldiers confirmed killed. By his courage, bold leadership and unwavering devotion to duty in the face of great personal danger, First Lieutenant Green upheld the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and the United States Naval Service.
Authority: Navy Department Board of Decorations and Medals
Home Town: Birmingham, Alabama

GREGORY, ROBERT B., JR.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Navy Cross to Robert B. Gregory, Jr. (2411976), Lance Corporal, U.S. Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism while serving as a Rifleman with Combined Action Platoon 2-1-2, Third Combined Action Group, III Marine Amphibious Force, in the Republic of Vietnam on 23 and 25 February 1969. Lance Corporal Gregory's platoon was participating in a search and destroy operation near the village of Hoa Huong in Quang Nam Province when the Marines sustained several casualties as they came under a heavy volume of hostile automatic weapons fire from a numerically superior force occupying well-fortified emplacements. Realizing the necessity for immediate action, Lance Corporal Gregory rushed across the fire-swept terrain to a machine gun which had been dropped by a wounded Marine and, with complete disregard for his own safety, provided covering fire which enabled his companions to remove the injured men to positions of relative safety. Having exhausted his ammunition and heedless of the enemy rounds impacting about him, he again ran forward and assisted a casualty to safety, after which he repeatedly crossed the dangerous terrain to retrieve weapons and equipment left behind by wounded men. When a medical evacuation helicopter arrived, he fearlessly exposed himself to the intense hostile fire raking the landing zone as he assisted the casualties to embark. On 25 February, during the same operation, Lance Corporal Gregory's platoon was directed to assist another unit which was heavily engaged with the enemy. Arriving at the designated location, he observed a wounded Marine fall in a position dangerously exposed to the hostile fire. After crawling to the man's side, he was treating the casualty when he detected an enemy soldier preparing to fire at his injured companion. Although realizing the explosion would reveal his presence to the hostile force, Lance Corporal Gregory immediately threw a hand grenade and killed the enemy soldier. Ignoring the hostile rounds that were being concentrated on his now revealed position, he began carrying the casualty from the area. Although struck by enemy fire three times, he refused to abandon his wounded comrade and successfully reached a position of relative safety. He refused medical evacuation to ensure that his comrade and other wounded were cared for. Although weak from his wounds and loss of blood, he continued to aid his fellow Marines until he received a fourth wound and was forced to abandon his selfless tasks. By his courage, bold initiative and unfaltering devotion to duty, Lance Corporal Gregory upheld the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and the United States Naval Service.
Authority: Navy Department Board of Decorations and Medals
Home Town: Los Angeles, California

GRESHAM, MICHAEL E.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Navy Cross to Michael E. Gresham (2378513), Sergeant [then Lance Corporal], U.S. Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism while serving as a Squad Leader with Company D, First Battalion, Fifth Marines, FIRST Marine Division (Reinforced), Fleet Marine Force, in connection with operations against the enemy in the Republic of Vietnam. On the night of 11 September 1968, while occupying a defensive position in Quang Nam Province, Company D came under intense rocket and mortar fire, immediately followed by a heavy volume of grenades and satchel charges supporting a human wave assault by a North Vietnamese Army company. When the hostile attack was initiated, Sergeant Gresham was at the platoon command post, and when the building was struck by several rocket rounds, the platoon commander, platoon sergeant, and both other squad leaders were wounded seriously. Momentarily stunned, Sergeant Gresham recovered quickly and, realizing that he was the senior Marine remaining uninjured, unhesitatingly assumed command of the platoon. With complete disregard for his own safety, he raced through the intense enemy fire, and moving from one position to another, shouted words of encouragement to his men and directed their fire, inflicting numerous losses on the advancing hostile soldiers. Ignoring the enemy rounds impacting nearby, he moved throughout the fire-swept area redistributing ammunition and assisting injured men to covered positions. Assessing the situation, he concluded that the rapid expenditure of ammunition and number of casualties his platoon had sustained made his position untenable. Quickly repairing an inoperable radio, Sergeant Gresham appraised the company commander of the situation and, at his direction, skillfully redeployed his men to an alternate location. Obtaining ammunition and hand grenades from adjacent units, Sergeant Gresham rapidly distributed them to his men and, when the enemy force again attacked, he directed his platoon's devastating fire and successfully repelled the hostile onslaught. His heroic and decisive action prevented the platoon from being overrun and saved the lives of several Marines. By his courage, bold initiative, and selfless devotion to duty, Sergeant Gresham inspired all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and the United States Naval Service.
Authority: Navy Department Board of Decorations and Medals
Home Town: Macon, Georgia

GRESKO, RICHARD W.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Navy Cross to Richard W. Gresko (2516983), Sergeant [then Lance Corporal], U.S. Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism while serving with Headquarters and Service Company, Third Battalion, Fifth Marine Regiment, FIRST Marine Division (Reinforced), Fleet Marine Force, in the Republic of Vietnam. On the night of 11 March 1970, Sergeant Gresko was in one element of an ambush set up to protect a village from enemy attack. Around midnight, his element ambushed a Viet Cong unit which was attempting to enter the village. During the ensuing fight, Sergeant Gresko observed an enemy hand grenade land near his position. With complete disregard for his own personal safety and fully aware of the dangers involved, he unhesitatingly threw himself on top of the grenade, absorbing most of the blast fragments with his own body in order to protect his men from certain injury and possible death. Although painfully wounded, he continued to direct his men's actions until the squad made their sweep. By his bold and heroic action on behalf of his fellow Marines, Sergeant Gresko reflected great credit upon himself and upheld the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and the United States Naval Service.
Authority: Navy Department Board of Decorations and Medals
Home Town: Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

GRIMES, PAUL E., JR.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Navy Cross to Paul E. Grimes, Jr. (2264945), Lance Corporal, U.S. Marine Corps (Reserve), for extraordinary heroism as a Rifleman with Company F, Second Battalion, Seventh Marines, FIRST Marine Division (Reinforced), Fleet Marine Force, in the Republic of Vietnam on 4 March 1967. During Operation DE SOTO, Company F was conducting a search and destroy mission in the vicinity of Thanh Hieu (1), Quang Ngai Province, when the second squad, third platoon was taken under intense enemy automatic weapons fire from a heavily fortified bunker. The initial enemy fire wounded one Marine and pinned down the remaining members of the second squad behind a rice paddy dike which lay approximately 100 meters from the enemy emplacement. The Company Commander joined the second squad and asked for a volunteer to advance on the bunker and attempt to destroy it by firing LAW's into the aperture. Lance Corporal grimes immediately volunteered and after obtaining two LAW's moved from his covered position and advanced thirty meters toward the bunker through the devastating enemy fire. After firing the two LAW's and striking the bunker both times, he returned to his previous position. Seconds later the clattering of the enemy automatic weapons was again heard from the bunker. Realizing that the LAW's had not penetrated the heavily fortified bunker and that the enemy must be silenced in order to evacuate the Marine who had been previously wounded, Lance Corporal Grimes took two grenades in hand and assaulted the bunker. As he advanced through the devastating enemy fire, bullets ripped at his flack jacket and two grenades were thrown at him. Upon reaching the enemy bunker, he fearlessly climbed up to the aperture, pulled the pins on his grenades, and thrust them through the opening. The destruction of the enemy bunker was the turning point in a violent action taken against the enemy. By his outstanding courage, exceptional fortitude and valiant fighting spirit, Lance Corporal Grimes served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and the United States Naval Service.
Authority: Navy Department Board of Decorations and Medals
Home Town: Corapolis, Pennsylvania

GROSZ, NICHOLAS H., JR.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Navy Cross to Nicholas H. Grosz, Jr. (0-85461), First Lieutenant, U.S. Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism as Commanding Officer of Headquarters and Service Company, Second Battalion, Seventh Marines, FIRST Marine Division (Reinforced), Fleet Marine Force, in the Republic of Vietnam on 18 December 1965, during Operation HARVEST MOON in Quang Tin Province near the hamlet of Ky Phy. When savage small arms, automatic weapons and mortar fire pinned his company down in a muddy and exposed rice paddy area, Lieutenant Grosz immediately informed his battalion of the seriousness of the situation and summoned help. Completely ignoring his own personal safety, he repeatedly ran the gauntlet of intense enemy fire to personally evacuate four wounded Marines. He returned to his men and gave them encouragement as he rallied them and directed their fire toward Viet Cong positions. In order to permit a few of the lesser wounded to make their way to relative safety while a rifle company was coming to the rescue, he personally engaged automatic weapons with a grenade launcher while enemy rounds were striking his pack and equipment. After returning to retrieve weapons and sundry abandoned gear, and to make certain that none of his men were left behind, he finally made his way to the main battle position and organized his company to support the battalion in its subsequent attack and mopping up operations. By his daring actions, indomitable fighting spirit, and loyal devotion to duty in the face of great personal danger, Lieutenant Grosz reflected distinct credit upon himself and the Marine Corps and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.
Authority: Navy Department Board of Decorations and Medals
Home Town: River Edge, New Jersey

GUARINO, TIMOTHY S.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Navy Cross to Timothy S. Guarino (2484801), Private First Class, U.S. Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism while serving as a Machine Gun Ammunition Man with Company G, Second Battalion, Ninth Marines, THIRD Marine Division (Reinforced), Fleet Marine Force, in the Republic of Vietnam on 1 June 1969. Company G came under a vicious ground attack by a determined hostile force utilizing satchel charges, automatic weapons fire and rocket-propelled grenades. While resolutely defending his position in a sector of the perimeter which had been penetrated by the enemy, Private First Class Guarino observed a wounded companion fall in a position dangerously exposed to the enemy advance. Completely disregarding his own safety, he fearlessly crossed the fire-swept area and carried his injured comrade to a place where medical aid was available. As he was assisting in treating the casualty, an enemy hand grenade landed beside the Corpsman and the wounded Marine. Fully aware of the possible consequences of his actions and thinking only of the safety of his companions, Private First Class Guarino unhesitatingly knocked the Corpsman to the ground beside the wounded Marine and valiantly threw himself over their bodies, thus absorbing the full force of the grenade's detonation and sustaining extensive wounds. His heroic and bold efforts inspired all who observed him and saved the lives of two comrades. By his courage, selfless concern for his fellowman and unwavering devotion to duty in the face of grave personal danger, Private First Class Guarino upheld the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and the United States Naval Service.
Authority: Navy Department Board of Decorations and Medals
Home Town: Coldwater, Michigan

GUAY, ROBERT P.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Navy Cross to Robert P. Guay (0-60940), Major, U.S. Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism while serving with Marine Medium Helicopter Squadron TWO HUNDRED SIXTY- ONE (HMM-261), Marine Aircraft Group SIXTEEN, First Marine Aircraft Wing, in the Republic of Vietnam on 19 March 1966. As Flight Leader often UH-34D aircraft on a mission to transport reinforcement troops into the outpost at An Hoa, which was rumored to have been overrun by the enemy during the previous night, Major Guay, upon approaching the outpost, held the flight at altitude while a visual reconnaissance was made. Advised that all appeared quiet and that Vietnamese civilians and military personnel had waved to the aircraft in a friendly manner, Major Guay proceeded with landing operations. As the first two aircraft were about to land, Viet Cong in ambush positions around the landing zone opened intense antiaircraft, small-arms and automatic weapons fire. Courageously braving the barrage, Major Guay completed the landing and disembarked the troops. Realizing that the Viet Cong completely controlled the area and had forced their prisoners to lure the aircraft into the trap, he made several additional attempts to land, then returned to the staging area at Quang Ngai. Volunteering to attempt the rescue of the Vietnamese soldiers just landed in the zone, Major Guay, as Flight Leader, directed the helicopter back to the beleaguered outpost and executed a single plane approach to the nearby landing zone. Although his aircraft sustained a damaging hit from enemy fire, he fearlessly continued his approach and successfully embarked a load of Vietnamese. Despite the continuing danger and battle damage to his aircraft, he remained in the vicinity to direct the efforts of other aircraft in the flight. His courageous actions, inspiring leadership and extraordinary airmanship undoubtedly prevented the friendly troops from being killed or captured by the enemy, reflected great credit upon himself and were in keeping with the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and the United States Naval Service.
Authority: Navy Department Board of Decorations and Medals
Home Town: Guilford, Connecticut

GUERRA, VICTOR J.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Navy Cross to Victor J. Guerra (2111973), Staff Sergeant, U.S. Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism while serving as a Platoon Sergeant with Company L, Third Battalion, First Marines, FIRST Marine Division (Reinforced), Fleet Marine Force, in connection with combat operations against the enemy in the Republic of Vietnam. On the night of 27 October 1969, while Staff Sergeant Guerra was returning to the Company Patrol Base with his men, he saw an enemy grenade land before him on the road in proximity to three of his companions. Fully aware of the possible consequences of his actions, he shouted a warning and then unhesitatingly threw himself over the grenade. Although realizing that every second's delay increased his chances of being mortally wounded, he remained in a prone position over the grenade until he was satisfied that the other Marines had attained covered positions. Then, rising to his knees, he hurled the grenade away from the Marines where it detonated harmlessly. His heroic and determined actions inspired all who observed him and undoubtedly saved three comrades from serious injury or possible death. By his courage, bold initiative, and selfless devotion to duty in the face of great personal risk, Staff Sergeant Guerra upheld the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and of the United States Naval Service.
Authority: Navy Department Board of Decorations and Medals

H

*HALSTEAD, LEE MICHAEL
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Navy Cross (Posthumously) to Lee Michael Halstead (0-94751), First Lieutenant, U.S. Marine Corps (Reserve), for extraordinary heroism while serving as a Pilot with Marine Light Helicopter Squadron ONE HUNDRED SIXTY-SEVEN (HML-167), Marine Aircraft Group SIXTEEN, First Marine Aircraft Wing, in connection with operations against insurgent communist (Viet Cong) forces in the Republic of Vietnam. On 29 August 1968, Lieutenant Halstead was Aircraft Commander aboard an armed UH-1E helicopter providing support for a UH-34 helicopter assigned to evacuate three wounded Marines from an area southwest of DaNang in Quang Nam Province. Seeking to determine the source of enemy fire, he boldly commenced a low-level pass over the friendly position and immediately came under intense hostile fire, which struck a box of ammunition in the crew's compartment. As the evacuation helicopter prepared to land, Lieutenant Halstead skillfully delivered covering fire on the hostile positions. Suddenly, the transport aircraft was damaged by enemy fire and crash-landed in hostile territory 500 meters from the friendly unit. With complete disregard for his own safety, Lieutenant Halstead commenced an approach to the disabled aircraft while simultaneously expending all remaining rockets and delivering a heavy volume of machine-gun fire around the damaged helicopter. Although the evacuation aircraft was receiving intense enemy antitank rocket and small-arms fire, he fearlessly continued his gallant efforts and executed a landing beside the downed crew members. Despite the hostile fire impacting nearby, he steadfastly remained on the ground until all the survivors had boarded his aircraft and, skillfully maneuvering his dangerously overloaded helicopter through the accurate fire, sustained additional damage as he departed the hazardous area. His heroic actions and extraordinary aeronautical skill inspired all who observed him and undoubtedly saved the lives of five Marines. By his courage, intrepid fighting spirit, and selfless devotion to duty in the face of grave personal danger, Lieutenant Halstead sustained and enhanced the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and the United States Naval Service.
Authority: Navy Department Board of Decorations and Medals
Home Town: Lansing, Michigan

HARRINGTON, MYRON C.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Navy Cross to Myron C. Harrington (0-81869), Captain, U.S. Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism while serving as Commanding Officer for Company D, First Battalion, Fifth Marines, FIRST Marine Division (Reinforced), Fleet Marine Force, in connection with operations against the enemy in the Republic of Vietnam. On the afternoon of 23 February 1968, Company D was attacking a well entrenched North Vietnamese Army force that was occupying a fortified section of the wall surrounding the Hue Citadel. As the Marines maneuvered forward, they began receiving a heavy volume of small arms, automatic weapons, mortar and antitank rocket fire. Realizing the seriousness of the situation, Captain Harrington skillfully deployed his 3.5 rocket teams into advantageous firing positions. Continuously moving from one position to another, he pinpointed enemy emplacements and skillfully directed the fire of his men. After silencing four hostile positions, he requested supporting arms fire and skillfully adjusted 60-mm. mortar fire to within twenty-five meters of the forward elements of his company, while simultaneously adjusting artillery fire. Disregarding his own safety, Captain Harrington then fearlessly maneuvered to the point of heaviest contact and, rallying his men, boldly led a determined assault against the enemy soldiers. Shouting words of encouragement to his men, he skillfully maneuvered his unit forward and directed the Marines' fire upon the hostile emplacements. Largely due to his resolute determination and intrepid fighting spirit, his men overran the hostile positions and routed the North Vietnamese soldiers, accounting for twenty-five enemy soldiers confirmed killed. By his courage, superb leadership and unfaltering devotion to duty in the face of extreme personal danger, Captain Harrington upheld the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and the United States Naval Service.
Authority: Navy Department Board of Decorations and Medals
Born: August 13, 1938 at Augusta, Georgia
Home Town: Charleston, South Carolina

*HARTSOE, DAVID EARL
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Navy Cross (Posthumously) to David Earl Hartsoe (2279897), Private First Class, U.S. Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism while serving as a Machine Gunner with Company L, Third Battalion, Ninth Marines, THIRD Marine Division (Reinforced), Fleet Marine Force, in the Republic of Vietnam on the evening of 20 May 1967. Company L was moving to bring a relief force to an embattled sister company when it engaged a strong enemy blocking force. Private First Class Hartsoe volunteered as point man to lead the company through the darkness to Company K. The enemy opened up on the relief force, and he positioned his gun in the foremost position. After a vicious fire fight the platoon was forced to withdraw to regroup. Private First Class Hartsoe knew that without the fire power of his gun, the platoon would be unable to recover the casualties and carry them to safety. Calmly accepting the consequences of their action, he and his team leader held their position under heavy automatic fire and a barrage of grenades, delivering covering fire while the others pulled out of the entrapped area. With complete disregard for his own safety, he held his own position until mortally wounded. By his dauntless courage, indomitable fighting spirit and loyal devotion to duty, Private First Class Hartsoe was instrumental in saving several Marine lives and thereby upheld the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country.
Authority: Navy Department Board of Decorations and Medals
Home Town: Coatesville, Pennsylvania

HAYES, DANIEL J.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Navy Cross to Daniel J. Hayes (2422326), Lance Corporal, U.S. Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism while serving as a Squad Leader with Company L, Third Battalion, Fifth Marines, FIRST Marine Division (Reinforced), Fleet Marine Force, in connection with operations against the enemy in the Republic of Vietnam. On 28 November 1968, Lance Corporal Hayes was directed to escort a sniper to a tree line some distance forward of the company's defensive perimeter and to provide security for the man while he was in position. Utilizing what little natural cover was available, Lance Corporal Hayes skillfully maneuvered his eight-man squad across an open rice paddy and was into the tree line when the Marines came under a heavy volume of small arms and automatic weapons fire from a numerically superior hostile force occupying well-concealed emplacements. In the initial burst of fire, five Marines were seriously wounded, including Lance Corporal Hayes. Ignoring his painful injuries, he refused medical attention and provided covering fire while his wounded companions were treated. Quickly deploying his men into covered fighting positions, he directed their suppressive fire upon the enemy soldiers. Observing a casualty being further subjected to hostile fire, he unhesitatingly threw himself across the man's body to protect him from additional injury. With exceptional tactical skill, he then regrouped his men for an orderly withdrawal across the open terrain to the company lines and, disregarding his own safety, provided covering fire for his squad. His heroic and timely actions inspired all who observed him and undoubtedly saved the lives of his Marines. By his courage, bold initiative, and selfless devotion to duty in the face of grave personal danger, Lance Corporal Hayes upheld the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and the United States Naval Service.
Authority: Navy Department Board of Decorations and Medals
Home Town: Billerica, Massachusetts

HAZELBAKER, VINCIL W.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Navy Cross to Vincil W. Hazelbaker (0-63157), Major, U.S. Marine Corps (Reserve), for extraordinary heroism while serving with Marine Observation Squadron TWO (VMO-2), Marine Aircraft Group SIXTEEN, First Marine Aircraft Wing during operations against enemy forces in Vietnam on 8 August 1966. While flying in support of ground operations in the vicinity of Ban Hieu, Major Hazelbaker observed two unsuccessful attempts to deliver ammunition to a Marine reaction force which had become surrounded by North Vietnamese forces. Realizing that the supplies were needed desperately by the besieged ground force, Major Hazelbaker daringly maneuvered his UH-1E helicopter through the darkness and intense hostile fire and skillfully landed near the Marines' position. Without regard for his own precarious situation, he re-supplied the ground unit with three thousand rounds of his own supply of ammunition, and thereby provided the defenders with temporary means of continuing their battle against overwhelming enemy force. Returning to Dong Ha Airfield, Major Hazelbaker courageously volunteered to return to the hazardous area with an additional load of ammunition for the same troops. With keen airmanship and fortitude, he again braved withering fire from North Vietnamese forces on all sides as close as fifteen yards to the position. Shortly after he landed with eight hundred pounds of direly needed ammunition, his aircraft was disabled by enemy fire, and two of his crewmen were wounded. With exceptional presence of mind and composure, Major Hazelbaker contacted the infantry unit and was advised that their officers had been wounded or killed. Displaying superior professionalism and firm leadership, he immediately assumed command of ground operations, reorganizing the defense, supervising distribution of ammunition, ensuring that the casualties were cared for and controlling supporting air strikes. Largely as a result of his determined and gallant effort, the Marine unit was able to break the impetus of the vicious enemy attack and maintain the position until daylight, when retraction could be effected. By his extraordinary courage in the face of extreme danger, bold aeronautical skill, and unfaltering dedication to duty throughout, Major Hazelbaker upheld the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and the United States Naval Service.
Authority: Navy Department Board of Decorations and Medals
Home Town: Grangeville, Idaho

HELLE, RONALD B.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Navy Cross to Ronald B. Helle (2146818), Sergeant, U.S. Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism while participating in a pacification operation in the vicinity of Combat Base Baldy with his unit which was located in a popular force compound in the Moo Bai District, Republic of Vietnam. On the night of 28 January 1971, Sergeant Helle, an Artillery Scout and Observer with Company G, Second Battalion, Fifth Marines, FIRST Marine Division (Reinforced), Fleet Marine Force, was sitting in the command post and talking with other members of his unit and a newspaper correspondent. Stepping outside to make a routine check of the area, Sergeant Helle was struck on the back by an object which he quickly recognized to be a grenade. He then threw himself upon the missile and alerted everyone to take cover, following which he stood up and hurled the grenade out of the compound. By his prompt and courageous action in the face of almost certain death or serious injury to himself and other men in the vicinity, Sergeant Helle upheld the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and the United States Naval Service.
Authority: Navy Department Board of Decorations and Medals
Home Town: Toledo, Ohio

HENDERSON, BILLY K.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Navy Cross to Billy K. Henderson, Lance Corporal, U.S. Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism while serving as a Squad Leader with Company H, Second Battalion, First Marines, FIRST Marine Division (Reinforced), Fleet Marine Force, during operations against enemy forces in the Republic of Vietnam on the night of 17 July 1969. Occupying an ambush site when he spotted approximately twenty-five enemy soldiers heading toward his squad's position, Lance Corporal Henderson ordered his men to withhold their fire, surmising that the hostile group was the lead element of a much larger force. He then arranged for an on-call artillery fire mission. Later, when an approximately sixty additional hostile soldiers emerged from the tree line and prepared to attack the command post, Lance Corporal Henderson initiated the ambush and simultaneously called for supporting artillery fire. While directing his squad's fire, an enemy grenade landed among three of his companions. Reacting instantly, he threw himself on the grenade to prevent injury to the other Marines. Fortunately, the grenade failed to explode. Lance Corporal Henderson then stood upright and hurled the missile into the enemy's ranks, following which he resumed his fire-directing activities and called for fixed-wing air strikes until the enemy broke contact, having suffered heavy casualties. By his outstanding personal valor, aggressive leadership, and inspiring devotion to duty, Lance Corporal Henderson was directly responsible for saving the other members of his squad from probable serious injury or death. His courageous and heroic efforts reflect great credit upon himself, and were in keeping with the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and of the United States Naval Service.
Authority: Navy Department Board of Decorations and Medals
Home Town: Philadelphia, Tennessee

HENDRICKS, ROBERT L.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Navy Cross to Robert L. Hendricks (2235429), Corporal, U.S. Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism while serving as the 60-mm. Mortar Section Leader with Company H, Second Battalion, Seventh Marines, FIRST Marine Division (Reinforced), Fleet Marine Force, in connection with operations against insurgent (Viet Cong) forces in the Republic of Vietnam. On the night of 19 February 1968, Corporal Hendricks was directing the 60-mm. mortar section as it conducted routine fire missions around the company perimeter when he observed an object about the size of a hand grenade land approximately fifteen feet from the mortar position. Locating the object, he found that it was a rock and, reporting the incident to the command post, alerted personnel along the defensive perimeter. A few minutes later, another rock landed on top of the ammunition storage area to the front of the mortar position. Again, Corporal Hendricks alerted those manning defensive positions and continued to direct the fire missions. Fifteen minutes later, a fragmentation grenade landed near the mortar position and only a few feet from two men sleeping on the ground. Reacting instantly and with complete disregard for his own safety, Corporal Hendricks jumped over the sandbag wall around the position, threw himself on the armed grenade and shouted to his companions to take cover. When all the men had reached safety and it appeared that the grenade would not detonate, he removed the explosive device to a safe area where it was destroyed. By his courage, bold initiative, and selfless devotion to duty at great personal risk, Corporal Hendricks upheld the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and the United States Naval Service.
Authority: Navy Department Board of Decorations and Medals
Home Town: Los Angeles, California

*HERRERA, FELIPE
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Navy Cross (Posthumously) to Felipe Herrera (2341619), Lance Corporal, U.S. Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism while serving with Company A, First Reconnaissance Battalion, FIRST Marine Division (Reinforced), Fleet Marine Force, in connection with operations against the enemy in the Republic of Vietnam. On the afternoon of 20 September 1968, Corporal Herrera was the machine gunner of a reconnaissance team operating near Thoung Due in Quang Nam Province when he alertly observed a large hostile force maneuvering to attack the Marines. Reacting instantly, he warned his comrades of the approaching enemy, and almost immediately the patrol came under a heavy volume of hostile automatic weapons fire. With complete disregard for his own safety, Corporal Herrera boldly moved from his position and fearlessly assaulted the enemy soldiers to within ten meters of their location, killing six of the attackers and halting their advance. Continuing his determined efforts, he resolutely remained in his dangerously exposed position and delivered intense machine-gun fire against the enemy until he was mortally wounded. His heroic and timely actions inspired all who observed him and were instrumental in enabling his comrades to gain fire superiority and deploy into advantageous defensive positions. By his courage, aggressive fighting spirit, and steadfast devotion to duty, Corporal Herrera upheld the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country.
Authority: Navy Department Board of Decorations and Medals
Home Town: San Antonio, Texas

*HERRON, LEE ROY
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Navy Cross (Posthumously) to Lee Roy Herron (0-102874), First Lieutenant, U.S. Marine Corps (Reserve), for extraordinary heroism while serving as Executive Officer, Company A, First Battalion, Ninth Marines, THIRD Marine Division (Reinforced), Fleet Marine Force, in the Republic of Vietnam on 22 February 1969. While patrolling north of the A Shau Valley in Quang Tri Province, the lead elements of Company A came under intense fire and were pinned down by a large North Vietnamese Army force. First Lieutenant Herron maneuvered one of his platoons forward to reinforce the lead elements. When the second platoon commander was seriously wounded, he immediately assumed command and quickly organized the men into an assault force. Skillfully deploying his men, he led them in an aggressive attack until halted and pinned down by an extremely heavy volume of cross-fire from several enemy machine guns augmented by mortar, rocket-propelled grenade, small arms, and automatic weapons fire from the North Vietnamese emplacements, as well as numerous sniper positions in trees in the dense jungle canopy. Undaunted by the hostile rounds impacting around him, First Lieutenant Herron repeatedly exposed himself to enemy fire as he moved among his men to encourage them and urged them to inch forward to positions from which they could deliver more effective return fire. Aware that the fire from two mutually supporting hostile machine guns was holding his Marines in place and preventing the removal of the casualties, he completely disregarded his own safety as he exposed himself to North Vietnamese fire to direct a light antitank assault round which scored a direct hit on one of the machine gun bunkers. Boldly leaping to his feet, he fearlessly charged across the fire-swept terrain to hurl hand grenades and fire his weapon against the enemy emplacement, killing nine North Vietnamese soldiers who were in the bunker. While directing his men in the assault on the remaining bunker, First Lieutenant Herron was mortally wounded by enemy sniper fire. His heroic actions inspired his men to such aggressive action in a coordinated company attack that 105 North Vietnamese soldiers were killed and the large bunker complex destroyed. By his courage, bold initiative and unwavering devotion to duty, First Lieutenant Herron upheld the highest traditions of the United States Marine Corps and the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country.
Authority: Navy Department Board of Decorations and Medals
Home Town: Lubbock, Texas

HILGERS, JOHN JACK WILLIAM
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Navy Cross to John Jack William Hilgers (0-74432), Captain, U.S. Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism as Battalion Operations Officer of the Second Battalion, Fourth Marines, THIRD Marine Division (Reinforced), Fleet Marine Force, in connection with operations against the enemy in the Republic of Vietnam on 23 and 24 August 1966. During Operation PRAIRIE, when a company from Captain Hilgers' battalion was attacked and surrounded by a numerically superior North Vietnamese force in the Thon Son Lam area, he immediately realized the seriousness of the situation and unhesitatingly volunteered to lead a reaction force to the company's aid. The battalion's disposition and the nature of its mission prevented dispatching one company as a unit, so a composite company was quickly formed and heli-lifted into the area just after dark. After analyzing the enemy's weaknesses, he fearlessly led his unit through 400 meters of enemy infested, dense, and unfamiliar jungle, dispatching one unit to halt the enemy's attack and neutralize deadly automatic weapons fire on the left flank. After joining the besieged unit, which was located in a bowl-shaped depression, Captain Hilgers selflessly exposed himself to heavy automatic weapons fire and grenades in order to move to the forward slope of the position to direct his forces better and insure that the beleaguered unit was obtaining the maximum support available. During the early morning hours of 24 August, the North Vietnamese launched three vicious assaults on the position, threatening to annihilate the trapped company. The combined force, under Captain Hilgers' inspiring and aggressive leadership, successfully repulsed each attack, inflicting heavy casualties on the enemy. Throughout the seemingly endless fourteen-hour battle, he repeatedly exposed himself to the devastating enemy fire to direct and control fire support and encourage his gallant fighting men. As a result of his heroic actions, the combined force successfully defeated the enemy attacks and relieved the pressure on the besieged company. By his outstanding leadership, fearless determination, great professional skill, and unfaltering dedication to duty in the face of extreme danger, Captain Hilgers reflected great credit upon himself and the Marine Corps and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.
Authority: Navy Department Board of Decorations and Medals
Home Town: Virginia Beach, Virginia

*HILL, LAMONT DOUGLAS
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Navy Cross (Posthumously) to Lamont Douglas Hill (2229088), Private First Class, U.S. Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism as a Machine Gunner serving with the Weapons Platoon, Company I, Third Battalion, Fourth Marines, THIRD Marine Division (Reinforced), Fleet Marine Force, in the Republic of Vietnam on 6 March 1967. While conducting a company sweep near the village of Tan Lich in Quang Tri Province, Private First Class Lamont Douglas Hill was attached to the Third Platoon when it was subjected to heavy automatic weapons fire from a well entrenched enemy. In the initial burst of enemy fire, he was fatally wounded. However, realizing the gravity of the situation, Private First Class Hill, disregarding his own serious and painful wound, manned his machine gun and brought deadly, well aimed fire to bear on the enemy. Refusing medical treatment, except when he stopped to reload his weapon, he provided covering fire so that his wounded comrades could be moved to defiladed positions of relative safety. Then he immediately shifted his weapon and began to provide a base of fire on the entrenched enemy which enabled two squads of the platoon to make a most successful assault, killing twenty of the enemy. Private First Class Hill, succumbing to his wounds, fell unconscious upon his machine gun. His heroic actions were responsible for saving the life of at least one Marine and were instrumental in the defeat of the enemy with no further friendly casualties. Private First Class Hill's courageous actions, aggressive fighting spirit and loyal devotion to duty reflected great credit upon himself and the United States Marine Corps and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country
Authority: Navy Department Board of Decorations and Medals
Home Town: Massillon, Ohio

HOAPILI, JOHN
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Navy Cross to John Hoapili (1764433), Gunnery Sergeant [then Staff Sergeant], U.S. Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism while serving as a Platoon Commander with Company K, Third Battalion, Twenty-Sixth Marines, THIRD Marine Division (Reinforced), Fleet Marine Force, in connection with operations against the enemy in the Republic of Vietnam. On 9 May 1968, Gunnery Sergeant Hoapili led a patrol composed of two five-man teams into an ambush position in Quang Tri Province. Arriving at the designated site, he skillfully deployed his two teams into mutually supporting positions. Alertly observing numerous North Vietnamese soldiers approaching his position, he immediately delivered a heavy volume of fire against the enemy, killing two hostile soldiers and initiating the ambush. After his men killed the remaining North Vietnamese, the Marines were conducting a thorough search of the area when they suddenly came under intense hostile fire. Reacting instantly, Sergeant Hoapili led his men to a pre-designated rendezvous and established a perimeter defense. Pinpointing an enemy machine-gun emplacement, he moved about the hazardous area, shouting words of encouragement to his men and gathering numerous hand grenades. Disregarding his own safety, he fearlessly rushed across the fire-swept terrain hurling hand grenades at the hostile position. As he maneuvered forward, he was knocked to the ground and seriously wounded when an enemy grenade detonated near him. Ignoring his painful injuries, he regained his feet and aggressively continued forward, delivering automatic rifle fire which killed the North Vietnamese soldiers and silenced their machine gun. His heroic and timely actions inspired all who observed him and forced the enemy to break contact and flee. By his daring initiative, intrepid fighting spirit, and unwavering devotion to duty in the face of extreme personal danger, Sergeant Hoapili contributed significantly to the accomplishment of his unit's mission and upheld the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and the United States Naval Service.
Authority: Navy Department Board of Decorations and Medals
Home Town: Honolulu, Hawaii

*HODGKINS, GUY MERRILL
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Navy Cross (Posthumously) to Guy Merrill Hodgkins (1490687), Staff Sergeant, U.S. Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism while serving as a Platoon Sergeant with Company I, Third Battalion, Ninth Marines, THIRD Marine Division (Reinforced), Fleet Marine Force, near An Hoa, Republic of Vietnam on 3 September 1966. While moving with the First Squad of his platoon, Sergeant Hodgkins came upon fifteen Viet Cong retreating along a trail and an adjoining trench line, and received heavy enemy automatic weapons fire. Reacting immediately, his men returned fire, forcing the Viet Cong to break contact and flee. To prevent the enemy's escape, he directed the squad in an aggressive pursuit of the Viet Cong for two hundred meters. Desperately setting up a hasty ambush in and around a concrete building, the enemy took cover and awaited their pursuers. Sergeant Hodgkins was cautiously leading his men forward when they suddenly received intense enemy fire, immediately sustaining three casualties. With complete disregard for his own safety, he courageously advanced, under heavy enemy fire, returning fire with a fallen Marines' weapon. Having expended all his rifle ammunition, he boldly continued to advance and, with only a grenade in each hand, assaulted the building from which the Viet Cong were delivering their most effective fire. He fearlessly moved to within point-blank range before throwing his grenades. His brave action resulted in three enemy deaths and the neutralization of Viet Cong fire from the building. Having accomplished his mission, he became the target of intense enemy fire and grenades and was finally struck and mortally wounded. Sergeant Hodgkins' heroic leadership, courage, and dedication to duty inspired his squad to assault and rout the entire enemy force. This resolute fighting spirit and great personal valor in the face of heavy odds reflected the highest credit upon himself and were in keeping with the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life in the cause of freedom.
Authority: Navy Department Board of Decorations and Medals
Home Town: Los Alamos, New Mexico

HOFF, JOHN R., JR.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Navy Cross to John R. Hoff, Jr. (111172), Second Lieutenant, U.S. Marine Corps (Reserve), for extraordinary heroism while serving as a Platoon Commander with Company E, First Reconnaissance Battalion, FIRST Marine Division (Reinforced), Fleet Marine Force, in connection with combat operations against the enemy in the Republic of Vietnam. On 7 April 1970, while leading a seven-man patrol through a heavily jungled area southwest of DaNang, Second Lieutenant Hoff detected signs of enemy soldiers in a hut and launched an aggressive assault, resulting in the destruction of the hut and four enemy dead. Continuing his mission, he led his men deeper into the confines of the camp where the Marines came under a heavy volume of grenade launcher fire from enemy soldiers occupying well-concealed emplacements. Although outnumbered, Second Lieutenant Hoff seized the initiative and led a counterattack against the enemy, boldly moving to a dangerously exposed vantage point from which he hurled hand grenades at the hostile soldiers. As a result of his valiant efforts and the accurate fire of his men, the enemy abandoned their positions and retreated. Shortly thereafter, Second Lieutenant Hoff located a large cache of arms and ammunition and was passing the supplies to his men when the patrol was subjected to intense grenade launcher fire from enemy soldiers who had maneuvered to a nearby position. Despite the rounds impacting around him, Second Lieutenant Hoff tenaciously held his ground, hurling hand grenades and delivering rifle fire with such accuracy that he accounted for several enemy casualties and forced the remainder of the enemy to retreat. The reconnaissance efforts of the patrol having now been seriously compromised, Second Lieutenant Hoff led his men to a nearby suitable landing zone and skillfully adjusted supporting Marine artillery fire around the site until they were safely extracted the following morning. His heroic and determined actions inspired all who observed him and contributed to the success of the mission without sustaining a single Marine casualty. By his courage, aggressive leadership, and unwavering devotion to duty, he upheld the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and of the United States Naval Service.
Authority: Navy Department Board of Decorations and Medals
Home Town: Boston, Massachusetts

HOLMES, WALTER C.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Navy Cross to Walter C. Holmes (2050005), Sergeant, U.S. Marine Corps, for outstanding heroism as a 60-mm. Mortar Section Leader serving with Company B, First Battalion, Ninth Marines, THIRD Marine Division (Reinforced), Fleet Marine Force, in the Republic of Vietnam on 27 December 1965. Sergeant Holmes was providing support for a combat patrol in the vicinity of DaNang when a force of sixty to eighty well-armed Viet Cong opened fire from concealed positions about fifteen meters away. Situated thirty meters to the rear from where the intense fire immediately felled several Marines, he fearlessly advanced toward the guerrillas, who were positioned along high sand dunes. When the Viet Cong attempted to overrun the patrol, Sergeant Holmes, with relentless fighting spirit, stood his ground and fired with an accuracy that drove back the enemy and provided cover for Marines who were maneuvering forward. Taking a mortar and all the rounds he could carry from a casualty, he aggressively moved to higher ground, directing twelve rounds, in a matter of seconds, at the fleeing Viet Cong. With continued presence of mind, he organized a hasty defense and prepared for medical evacuation and relief forces. By his exceptional courage in the face of extreme peril, Sergeant Holmes saved the patrol from further casualties and upheld the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and the United States Naval Service.
Authority: Navy Department Board of Decorations and Medals
Home Town: St. Louis, Missouri

*HONEYCUTT, JAMES EARL (MIA)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Navy Cross (Posthumously) to James Earl Honeycutt (2356099), Private First Class, U.S. Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism while serving with the Third Force Reconnaissance Company, Third Reconnaissance Battalion, THIRD Marine Division (Reinforced), Fleet Marine Force, in connection with operations against the enemy in the Republic of Vietnam on 16 February 1968. While on patrol southeast of Con Thien, Private Honeycutt's team established an ambush when seven enemy soldiers were observed moving toward their position. During the initial exchange of fire, one Marine was seriously wounded. Disregarding his own safety, Private Honeycutt moved to an exposed area where he provided covering fire for the Corpsman who was treating the injured man. After annihilating the enemy force, the team moved toward a landing zone to evacuate the casualty. As the team moved forward, they were taken under devastating enemy small-arms, automatic-weapons and mortar fire from an estimated two companies of North Vietnamese soldiers. In the initial burst of enemy fire, three Marines were wounded. With complete disregard for his own safety, Private Honeycutt moved across the fire-swept terrain to the side of an injured comrade and administered first aid. He then provided covering fire and assisted in moving the casualties across forty meters of fire-swept terrain to a waiting evacuation helicopter. Displaying exceptional courage, he remained behind to deliver a heavy volume of fire that suppressed hostile fire sufficiently to allow the team to embark. Only after all were aboard did he then embark. Realizing that a wounded man remained in the zone and that the injured team leader had debarked to search the hazardous area, he unhesitatingly jumped from the helicopter to aid his fellow Marines. Upon the arrival of the second extraction aircraft, he then assisted his wounded comrades aboard. By his bold initiative, intrepid fighting spirit and loyal devotion to duty, Private Honeycutt reflected great credit upon himself and the Marine Corps and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.
Authority: Navy Department Board of Decorations and Medals
Home Town: Haynes, Arkansas

*HOPKINS, MICHAEL EDWARD
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Navy Cross (Posthumously) to Michael Edward Hopkins (2037164), Private First Class, U.S. Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism while serving as an Automatic Rifleman with Company K, Third Battalion, Ninth Marines, THIRD Marine Division (Reinforced), Fleet Marine Force, in the Republic of Vietnam on 4 July 1966. During a search and destroy operation, the company was taken under heavy small-arms, automatic-weapons, and 57-mm. recoilless rifle fire from a numerically superior Viet Cong force. When an LVT was hit by a 57-mm. recoilless rifle round, Private First Class Hopkins immediately ran through the hail of small-arms fire to aid the injured crew. After he had helped remove the injured men from the LVT, he and three other Marines were sent to a forward position in order to give covering fire. As the ammunition ran low, Private First Class Hopkins repeatedly exposed himself to heavy enemy fire as he ran across open ground to the supply point. After his sixth trip, he saw his squad leader fall from wounds. Although exhausted from the heat and carrying ammunition, he courageously exposed himself again to heavy incoming fire in order to administer immediate first aid to his squad leader. As he was treating the wounded Marine, he noticed a Corpsman attempting to maneuver to his position. Seizing his rifle once again, he began giving covering fire to enable the Corpsman to attain his objective. Seconds after the Corpsman reached the location an enemy rifle grenade exploded nearby killing the squad leader and wounding the Corpsman. Realizing that the enemy fire was too intense for anyone to come to their aid, Private First Class Hopkins, in a final valiant act of complete self-sacrifice, deliberately exposed himself in an effort to direct attention away from the wounded, absorbing with his own body the full force of the deadly enemy fire. Through his extraordinary loyalty and initiative in the face of almost certain death, he saved his comrades from further injury and possible loss of life, thereby upholding the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country.
Authority: Navy Department Board of Decorations and Medals
Born: December 23, 1944 at Norfolk, Virginia
Home Town: Norfolk, Virginia

HOUGHTON, KENNETH J.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Navy Cross to Kenneth J. Houghton (0-13965), Colonel, U.S. Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism as Commanding Officer, Fifth Marines, FIRST Marine Division (Reinforced), Fleet Marine Force, in the Republic of Vietnam from 26 May to 5 June 1967. The Fifth Marine Regiment was launched on Operation UNION II to track down the remnants of the 21st North Vietnamese Regiment, which had been thoroughly decimated by them nine days previous. Responding to intelligence reports that the enemy was attempting to withdraw to the western mountains, Colonel Houghton committed two battalions in pursuit. The First Battalion swept overland while the Third Battalion was enveloped by helicopter near Cam La. The Third Battalion met with heavy resistance, but completely overran the enemy positions, causing many casualties. He was constantly in the operational area, bravely exposing himself to all the hazards of the battlefield. Colonel Houghton revised his tactics when intelligence reports indicated a much larger enemy force in the area, which was identified as the 3d North Vietnamese Regiment and pointed to a buildup along the Suio Cau Doi River, in the vicinity of Vinh Huy (2). Instantly reacting, he launched his attack from the east, with the First and Third Battalions abreast and the Second in reserve. On 2 June, the First Battalion came under intense enemy mortar, recoilless rifle and automatic weapons fire, indicating contact with the main force of the 3d North Vietnamese Army force. While the First and Third Battalions maintained heavy pressure on the enemy, he committed the Second Battalion to assault the enemy's flank. Although wounded at this time, he continued to aggressively advance on the enemy with renewed determination. Colonel Houghton launched a bold night attack which smashed through the enemy defenses, and annihilated the large enemy force. By his outstanding leadership, gallant fighting spirit and bold initiative, he contributed materially to the success of the FIRST Marine Division, thereby upholding the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and the United States Naval Service.
Authority: Navy Department Board of Decorations and Medals
Born: October 17, 1920 at San Francisco, California
Home Town: San Francisco, California

HOUSE, CHARLES ALNE
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Navy Cross to Charles Alne House (0-26690), Lieutenant Colonel, U.S. Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism as Commanding Officer, Marine Medium Helicopter Squadron ONE HUNDRED SIXTY-THREE (HMM-163), Marine Aircraft Group SIXTEEN, First Marine Aircraft Wing, in action in the Republic of Vietnam on 9 and 10 March 1966. Colonel House's helicopter was disabled by intense enemy fire in the landing zone at A Shau, where the garrison had been under siege for several days. After ensuring that all personnel had abandoned the aircraft, Colonel House immediately rallied his crew members and joined a group of seventy exhausted survivors of the garrison. With inspiring leadership and dogged determination, he skillfully led the group into the jungle to escape capture. Chopping a trail through the dense underbrush, he moved into the hills which surrounded the outpost, cleverly maneuvering between hostile positions and successfully evading enemy search patrols. Although the group was subjected to harassing fire throughout the march, Colonel House managed to overcome the language barrier and instill in the Vietnamese a sense of confidence and encouragement which sustained them through the ordeal. With constant concern for the welfare of the survivors, many of whom were wounded, he halted the march several times to allow them to rest, stalwartly standing watch while others slept. When helicopters were sighted and signaled on the following afternoon, Colonel House's brilliant leadership motivated all who were able to help clear a position from which the rescue was subsequently effected. His valiant effort and determination throughout contributed in large measure to saving the members of his crew and many Special Forces and Vietnamese defenders from capture or death at the hands of the Viet Cong. By his intrepid fighting spirit, extraordinary ability as a leader, and unswerving dedication to duty, Colonel House upheld the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and the United States Naval Service.
Authority: Navy Department Board of Decorations and Medals
Home Town: West Plains, Missouri

*HOWARD, BILLY
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Navy Cross (Posthumously) to Billy Howard (554586), Gunnery Sergeant, U.S. Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism as Company Gunnery Sergeant, Company E, Second Battalion, Fourth Marines, THIRD Marine Division (Reinforced), Fleet Marine Force, during Operation TEXAS in Quang Ngai Province, Republic of Vietnam on 21 March 1966. Upon arrival in its assigned helicopter landing zone, Company E came under withering enemy small-arms and automatic weapons fire from three directions. The volume and effectiveness of this fire forced the battalion to modify its tactical plan and move Company E to a newly designated line of departure. Braving heavy enemy fire, Gunnery Sergeant Howard moved from heli-team to heli-team as they arrived in the landing zone providing instructions for this re-disposition of forces. Once deployed on their assigned line of departure, and upon completion of preparatory air and artillery fires, Company E commenced an assault against the hamlet of Phuong Dinh (2). After crossing an open rice paddy, and when within twenty-five meters of the objective, Company E was struck with a vicious fusillade of small arms, automatic weapons, recoilless rifle, and mortar fire. The volume and intensity of the enemy fire immediately inflicted numerous friendly casualties and had the majority of the company pinned down, unable to move in any direction. Seeing his Company Commander trapped in heavy cross fire and incapable of movement, Gunnery Sergeant Howard immediately seized the initiative and dashed forward from a relatively secure position to the point of furthest contact. With full knowledge that his life was in jeopardy, he moved among the dead and wounded and supervised their evacuation to the rear. In complete defiance of the enemy and braving certain death, he rallied his fellow Marines to leave their covered positions and continue the assault. His indomitable fighting spirit, fearless leadership, and outstanding courage inspired his men to charge aggressively forward and destroy the enemy fortifications. Mortally wounded during this assault, Gunnery Sergeant Howard, by his great personal valor and unswerving devotion to duty, reflected great credit upon himself, the Marine Corps and the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country.
Authority: Navy Department Board of Decorations and Medals
Home Town: Hialeah, Florida

*HOWELL, GATLIN JERRYL
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Navy Cross (Posthumously) to Gatlin Jerryl Howell (0-93190), First Lieutenant, U.S. Marine Corps (Reserve), for extraordinary heroism while serving as Intelligence Officer, First Battalion, Ninth Marines, THIRD Marine Division (Reinforced), Fleet Marine Force, in the Republic of Vietnam from 2 to 7 July 1967. While manning the command bunker at Con Thien on 2 July, First Lieutenant Howell was closely monitoring the progress of Company B, First Battalion, as it became heavily engaged with an estimated two battalions of North Vietnamese Army Regulars near the Demilitarized Zone. When the unit suffered heavy casualties and was in danger of being overrun, he volunteered to lead a relief force to rescue the beleaguered Marines. Displaying exceptional leadership and tactical skill during his advance, he fearlessly exposed himself to enemy mortar and small-arms fire as he kept the relief column intact, pointing out directions of fire for the tanks and providing effective flank security as he moved rapidly to Company B's position. Immediately evaluating the situation when he arrived in the battle area, he established a defensive perimeter and moved to rescue the forward elements of the besieged company. As he searched for the wounded, he observed two men in a hole fifteen meters beyond the friendly lines. With complete disregard for his own safety, First Lieutenant Howell ran through heavy small-arms fire to treat the men and carry them to the safety of the perimeter. When his right flank was threatened by a North Vietnamese squad, he directed heavy fire against the assaulting force, undoubtedly saving the lives of at least three injured Marines caught between the enemy and the friendly lines. Subject to intense enemy mortar and artillery fire and road mines that disabled two tanks, he moved the casualties to the landing zone. After ensuring that the casualty evaluation process was well under way, he refused medical treatment for himself and instead returned to the forward area to determine that all of the wounded had been moved. During a rocket attack on 7 July at Con Thien, First Lieutenant Howell was killed in action. By his intrepid fighting spirit, daring initiative, and selfless devotion to duty at great personal risk, First Lieutenant Howell was instrumental in saving many of his fellow Marines from capture, injury or possible death, and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Marine Corps and of the United States Naval Service He gallantly gave his life for his country.
Authority: Navy Department Board of Decorations and Medals
Home Town: Colma, California

*HUBBARD, ROBERT WALKER
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Navy Cross (Posthumously) to Robert Walker Hubbard (0-88752), Captain, U.S. Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism while serving as an Advisor to the Revolutionary Development Cadre, Thua Thien Province, in the City of Hue, Republic of Vietnam, from 31 January to 4 February 1968. On 31 January, while carrying out his advisory duties within the city of Hue, the quarters in which Captain Hubbard was temporarily residing, together with two military and two civilian personnel, came under intense enemy ground attack. Quickly assuming command, he organized a defense against the repeated assaults from the enemy forces and covered the front door along with two of his companions. Every attempt by the enemy to overrun their strongpoint was thwarted, until finally, after two of his group were seriously wounded, withdrawal was necessary. Quickly assessing the situation, he braved the intense enemy fire while searching for a covered route through which his group could withdraw. Despite the ever increasing enemy fire, he elected to cover the withdrawal of his unit and inflicted numerous casualties upon the enemy. During the ensuing days, the enemy maintained almost complete control of the city of Hue, and Captain Hubbard's group of men found it necessary to move from shelter to shelter to escape death or possible capture. Although acting in the capacity as a civilian advisor at the time of the Tet Offensive, Captain Hubbard's skill as a Marine infantry officer instantly surfaced during this crisis. He was constantly moving, administering to the wounded, foraging for food and water for his companions, searching for assistance from friendly forces, and returning deadly accurate fire on the enemy. On 4 February, with all food, water and ammunition depleted, he led the group, armed only with a single hand grenade, in an attempt to reach friendly forces south of the city. During this time he was hit and mortally wounded by small-arms fire. By his brilliant leadership, intrepid fighting spirit and exceptional fortitude, Captain Hubbard was largely responsible for the escape of his fellow Americans. His outstanding courage and valiant devotion to duty reflected the highest credit upon himself, the Marine Corps and the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country.
Authority: Navy Department Board of Decorations and Medals
Home Town: Auburn, Alabama

HUFFCUT, WILLIAM H., II
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Navy Cross to William H. Huffcut, II (0-76752), Major, U.S. Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism while serving as a Pilot with Marine Observation Squadron SIX (VMO-6), Marine Aircraft Group THIRTY-SIX, First Marine Aircraft Wing in connection with combat operations against the enemy in the Republic of Vietnam. On the morning of 28 September 1969, Major Huffcut launched a Tactical Air Controller (Airborne) aboard an aircraft assigned the mission of conducting an aerial reconnaissance south of the Demilitarized Zone. Receiving urgent request to support an infantry unit which was heavily engaged in combat with a hostile force, he immediately proceeded to the designated area and was informed by the commander of the ground unit that his men were pinned down by machine-gun fire. Undaunted by the extremely heavy volume of enemy fire directed at his aircraft, Major Huffcut executed repeated attacks and delivered his ordnance with such devastating effectiveness that the hostile fire was suppressed sufficiently to enable the Marines to move to a more tenable position. When a flight of F-4 Phantom aircraft arrived, Major Huffcut skillfully coordinated and directed accurate air strikes upon the enemy emplacement, and carried out a series of strafing runs at right angles to the attack aircraft, a tactic which effectively distracted the enemy from firing on the Phantoms. As a result, the hostile machine gun emplacement was destroyed. Shortly thereafter, he skillfully executed the same flight and attack patterns on repeated passes which succeeded in destroying a second enemy position. Subsequently responding to an emergency request to assist a Marine reconnaissance team which was pinned down by a large enemy force, Major Huffcut expertly maneuvered his aircraft on both simulated and live rocket and strafing runs, and skillfully directed the air strikes of A-4 Skyhawk aircraft which routed the enemy. By his dauntless courage, superb airmanship, and unwavering devotion to duty in the face of great personal danger, Major Huffcut inspired all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and the United States Naval Service.
Authority: Navy Department Board of Decorations and Medals
Home Town: Tallahassee, Florida

HUGGINS, MICHAEL A.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Navy Cross to Michael A. Huggins (2470841), Private First Class, U.S. Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving as a Rifleman with Company G, Second Battalion, Fourth Marines, THIRD Marine Division (Reinforced), Fleet Marine Force, in connection with combat operations against the enemy in the Republic of Vietnam. On the morning of 27 June 1969, Private First Class Huggins' fire team, having secured a landing zone northwest of Fire Support Base Sierra in Quang Tri Province, was maneuvering up a hill when he observed a North Vietnamese Army squad in an ambush position. Reacting instantly, he skillfully deployed his men and initiated contact with the enemy. Although painfully wounded by the initial burst of hostile fire, Private First Class Huggins led his comrades in an assault against the enemy positions. Courageously moving throughout the fire-swept terrain, he shouted instructions and encouraged his men as he directed their fire at the enemy. When a hostile hand grenade landed between him and another Marine, Private First Class Huggins immediately picked up the grenade and threw it back at the enemy where it subsequently exploded. Relentlessly pursuing his objective, he continued his assault against the hostile bunkers, forcing the enemy to break contact. His heroic and timely actions inspired all who observed him and contributed significantly to the defeat of the North Vietnamese Army force. By his courage, superb leadership and unwavering devotion to duty in the face of extreme personal danger, Private First Class Huggins upheld the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and of the United States Naval Service.
Authority: Navy Department Board of Decorations and Medals
Home Town: Indianapolis, Indiana

HUGHES, STANLEY S.
(Second Award)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting a Gold Star in lieu of a Second Award of the Navy Cross to Stanley S. Hughes (0-12654), Colonel, U.S. Marine Corps (Reserve), for extraordinary heroism while serving as Commanding Officer of the First Marines, FIRST Marine Division (Reinforced), Fleet Marine Force, in connection with operations against the enemy in the Republic of Vietnam on 3 February 1968. During Operation HUE CITY, Colonel Hughes displaced his command post from Phu Bai to Hue along National Route One through enemy controlled territory. Undaunted by the heavy volume of hostile fire around him as he entered the besieged city, he rapidly moved his men along the fire-swept streets to reach the Military Assistance Command, Vietnam Compound. Moving to a vantage point on a roof top, he directed accurate counter-mortar and sniper fire, effectively suppressing the hostile fire in the area. He then maneuvered two battalions in an aggressive assault against the enemy, repeatedly disregarding his own safety to move to the areas of heaviest fighting to advise his commanders, encourage his men and personally request and direct support arms fire. When the First Battalion, Fifth Marines was attached to his regiment during heavy fighting, he fearlessly crossed the footbridge over the Perfume River under heavy fire, joining the command group at the Citadel to brief the unit commanders of the tactical situation and remain abreast of the battalion's progress. He repeatedly traveled across dangerously exposed areas to ensure the availability and uninterrupted distribution of vital supply items and equipment to his units. By his bold initiative, intrepid fighting spirit and superior tactical skill, Colonel Hughes was instrumental in the defeat and annihilation of a numerically superior enemy force, thereby reflecting great credit upon himself and the Marine Corps and upholding the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.
Authority: Navy Department Board of Decorations and Medals
Home Town: Rome, Pennsylvania
Other Award: Navy Cross (WWII)

HUNNICUTT, HUBERT H., III
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Navy Cross to Hubert H. Hunnicutt, III (2277992), Sergeant [then Corporal], U.S. Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism on 16 to 18 April 1968 as a squad leader in Company C, First Battalion, Ninth Marines, THIRD Marine Division (Reinforced), Fleet Marine Force, in connection with operations against enemy forces in the Republic of Vietnam. Participating in the attack against an enemy bunker complex on a hilltop near the Khe Sanh Combat Base when the battalion came under heavy fire, seriously wounding his platoon commander, Sergeant Hunnicutt treated the officer's wounds and then directed squad members into a bomb crater to await a lull in the enemy activity. When Sergeant Hunnicutt attempted to emerge from the crater, he sustained serious wounds along with other members of his unit, and was unable to leave his position because of the continuing enemy fire raking the area. At dusk he left the position and crawled across the fire-swept terrain to secure medical aid for himself and the other casualties trapped in the bomb crater. En route, Sergeant Hunnicutt discovered his company commander lying in an open area, severely wounded. While attempting to render aid and assistance to the officer, Sergeant Hunnicutt was again wounded. Nonetheless, he was able to fire at the enemy positions and to hurl hand grenades, eventually silencing their fire. At the first rays of dawn, he managed to move the company commander to a covered position and then proceeded to seek medical assistance but, overcome by weakness from loss of blood, fell into a gully where he lay for several hours. Alerted by the sound of an aircraft, he gathered his last remaining strength and attracted the attention of the pilot who thereupon landed, placed Sergeant Hunnicutt aboard the observation craft, and then relayed a message to pinpoint the location of the company commander. By his indomitable courage, his selfless concern for the safety and welfare of his fellow Marines, and his inspiring devotion to duty in the face of overwhelming adversity, Sergeant Hunnicutt upheld the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and the United States Naval Service.
Authority: Navy Department Board of Decorations and Medals
Home Town: Suwanee, Georgia

J

JAEHNE, RICHARD L.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Navy Cross to Richard L. Jaehne (106958), Second Lieutenant, U.S. Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism while serving as a Platoon Leader with Company K, Third Battalion, Seventh Marines, FIRST Marine Division (Reinforced), Fleet Marine Force, in connection with combat operations against the enemy in the Republic of Vietnam. On 28 August 1969, while moving through an open rice paddy during a company-sized search and clear operation in the Que Son-Hiep Due Valley in Quang Nam Province, Second Lieutenant Jaehne's platoon came under intense mortar, automatic-weapons, and small-arms fire from a well-entrenched North Vietnamese Army force. Quickly assessing the situation, he deployed his platoon into firing positions and launched an aggressive counterattack. During the ensuing fire fight, he repeatedly disregarded his own safety to gain vantage points from which to direct the fire of his men against one hostile position after another. When one of his squads was temporarily pinned down by fire from a heavy machine gun, he inched his way through the deep rice paddy and, in full view of the enemy gunners, destroyed the machine gun with a hand grenade, using his pistol to dispose of the last of the enemy gunners in the emplacement. Although he had sustained a painful fragmentation wound in the shoulder and a bullet wound in the hand, Second Lieutenant Jaehne rallied his Marines, retrieved the radio from his fallen radio operator, restored communications, and continued the attack until the enemy broke contact and withdrew, leaving behind thirteen casualties, several crew-served weapons, and numerous rifles and items of equipment. By his courage, aggressive leadership, and unflagging devotion to duty in an extremely hazardous situation, Second Lieutenant Jaehne upheld the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and of the United States Naval Service.
Authority: Navy Department Board of Decorations and Medals
Home Town: Stafford, Virginia

*JMAEFF, GEORGE VICTOR
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Navy Cross (Posthumously) to George Victor Jmaeff (2436055), Corporal, U.S. Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism while serving as a Platoon Sergeant with Company C, First Battalion, Fourth Marines, THIRD Marine Division (Reinforced), Fleet Marine Force, in the Republic of Vietnam on 1 March 1969. While Company C was attempting to seize Hill 484 north of the Rockpile, the lead platoon was pinned down by sniper fire and grenades from North Vietnamese Army soldiers who were acting as mortar forward observers and occupying well-fortified bunkers. Corporal Jmaeff, realizing that a frontal attack would produce excessive Marine casualties, directed three men to provide covering fire and, fully aware of the possible consequences of his daring action, initiated a lone assault on the hostile emplacements. Although seriously wounded by fragments of a hand grenade, he ignored his painful injuries and, resolutely obtaining his objective, destroyed the first enemy position. With the arrival of a reaction platoon, Corporal Jmaeff steadfastly refused medical treatment and continued to direct his men until ordered to receive medical aid. While his wounds were being tended, he observed several Marines injured during a new barrage of mortar fire and, tearing the intravenous fluid tube from his arm, unhesitatingly left his relatively secure location to aid his companions. As he dauntlessly struggled forward in a splendid display of valor, he was mortally wounded by the detonation of a mortar round. His heroic efforts and selfless concern for his fellowmen inspired all who observed him and were instrumental in his unit's securing the objective. By his courage, aggressive fighting spirit and unwavering devotion to duty, Corporal Jmaeff upheld the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country.
Authority: Navy Department Board of Decorations and Medals
Born: August 14, 1945 at Canada Home Town: , Canada

JOHNSON, JAMES L, JR.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Navy Cross to James L Johnson, Jr. (2288355), Corporal, U.S. Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism while serving as a Squad Leader with Company E, Second Battalion, Ninth Marines, THIRD Marine Division (Reinforced), Fleet Marine Force, in connection with operations against the enemy in the Republic of Vietnam. On 17 February 1969, Corporal Johnson was directed to seize a hostile bunker complex which had pinned down elements of Company H in A Shau Valley. As the squad advanced through the hazardous area, the Marines came under a heavy volume of fire from an enemy machine gun 20 meters to their front. Not wishing to incur excessive casualties, Corporal Johnson called for supporting arms fire from gunships overhead and marked the hostile position with air bursts from his grenade launcher. When the pilots failed to locate the emplacements, he fearlessly stood in full view of the North Vietnamese Army force and waived air panels to indicate his position to the gunships. As the air strikes began, he brought his squad on line and directed the Marines toward the bunker complex, simultaneously adjusting the air strikes on his own position because of his proximity to the hostile soldiers. After the air strikes had ceased, the pilots informed him that his actions had driven 15 enemy soldiers into an open area behind the complex and that these North Vietnamese had been killed by the successive air strikes. Continuing his mission, Corporal Johnson led an aggressive assault against the bunkers during which he received a grenade fragment wound in his hand. Disregarding his injury, he resolutely proceeded across the fire-swept terrain, shouting words of encouragement to his men and directing their fire. Having sustained a second grenade fragment wound, this time in his leg, he steadfastly ignored his painful injuries, fearlessly made his way to the enemy bunker, and threw a hand grenade through the aperture of the bunker, razing the position and killing its three occupants. Deploying his men around the bunker, he directed a search of the area which revealed a complex of three more bunkers and two dead North Vietnamese soldiers. As he was preparing to rejoin the rest of his platoon, he heard moaning sounds from outside the squad's defensive perimeter. Suspecting an enemy trap, he alerted his men, then went alone to investigate the source of the noise and found one mortally wounded and one seriously wounded Marine from Company H, who had been injured in the previous engagement. Working rapidly and knowledgeably, Corporal Johnson rendered first aid to the casualty, thereby saving the man's life. Rejoining his platoon, he steadfastly refused medical attention until all other casualties had been treated and medically evacuated. His heroic and timely actions inspired all who observed him and were instrumental in minimizing Marine casualties. By his courage, intrepid fighting spirit, and unwavering devotion to duty in the face of grave personal danger, Corporal Johnson contributed significantly to the accomplishment of his unit's mission and upheld the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and the United States Naval Service.
Authority: Navy Department Board of Decorations and Medals

*JOHNSTON, CLEMENT B., JR.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Navy Cross (Posthumously) to Clement B. Johnston, Jr. (2116397), Lance Corporal, U.S. Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism as a member of a reconnaissance platoon, Company D, First Reconnaissance Battalion, FIRST Marine Division (Reinforced), Fleet Marine Force, in action against enemy Viet Cong forces in the vicinity of Xuan Ngoc Village in Quang Ngai Province, Republic of Vietnam, on 28 April 1966. Corporal Johnston, a fellow Marine, and a Navy Corpsman were occupying a position when an undetermined number of insurgents (Viet Cong) quietly approached their location and threw two hand grenades into their midst. Corporal Johnston saw one of the grenades and leaped at his companions, knocking them to the ground and shielding them from the blast of the grenade. In so doing he absorbed the terrific force of the explosion and saved his friends from major injuries and possible loss of life. Corporal Johnston's courageous action and selfless devotion to duty upheld the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life in the cause of freedom.
Authority: Navy Department Board of Decorations and Medals
Home Town: Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

*JONES, PHILIP BOYD
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Navy Cross (Posthumously) to Philip Boyd Jones (0-106589), Second Lieutenant, U.S. Marine Corps (Reserve), for extraordinary heroism while serving as a Platoon Commander with Company G, Second Battalion, Twenty-Sixth Marines, Ninth Marine Amphibious Brigade in the Republic of Vietnam on 28 January 1969. During Operation LINN RIVER, the Second Platoon of Company G was patrolling along a stream in Quang Nam Province when the Marines came under a heavy volume of fire from hostile soldiers occupying well-concealed emplacements and, after sustaining several casualties, deployed to the marginal shelter of a bomb crater. Observing that the platoon leader was among the casualties, Second Lieutenant Jones mustered his radio operator and a fire team and fearlessly went to the aid of the beleaguered unit. After rapidly assessing the situation and realizing the advantage held by the numerically superior enemy force, he elected to utilize supporting artillery fire upon the North Vietnamese Army positions, but was faced with the necessity to evacuate the casualties who were lying in an unprotected area near the hostile emplacements. Unhesitatingly leading his companion across the fire-swept terrain, he effected the rescue of three of the injured men. As he, with his radio operator, again boldly entered the enemy kill zone and approached to within five meters of the hostile soldiers to evacuate the remaining helpless Marine, Second Lieutenant Jones was seriously wounded, but, determined to save his comrade, ignored his painful injury and was delivering suppressive fire on the North Vietnamese positions when he was mortally wounded. By his courage, selfless concern for his fellowmen and unwavering devotion to duty, Second Lieutenant Jones upheld the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country.
Authority: Navy Department Board of Decorations and Medals
Home Town: Slater, Iowa

*JOYS, JOHN WILLIAM
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Navy Cross (Posthumously) to John William Joys (1624442), Sergeant, U.S. Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism while serving with Company A, First Battalion, Fourth Marines, THIRD Marine Division (Reinforced), Fleet Marine Force, in the defense of a forward tank and artillery position at Cam Lo in Vietnam on 26 August 1966. Employing satchel charges, hand grenades and a heavy concentration of automatic weapons, the enemy launched a fanatic assault against the Marine perimeter, penetrating the First Platoon's lines. Staff Sergeant Joys, the platoon sergeant, was wounded by mortar fire during the initial phase of the attack. In spite of his painful wound, he proceeded to organize and coordinate the defenses in his sector, spotting targets, directing fires, and constantly exposing himself while moving up and down the lines through the area where enemy fire was the heaviest. He made repeated trips carrying desperately needed ammunition to the men on the line, stopping briefly to spot and shift targets while encouraging adamant determination of his men to stop the penetration. At one time, while moving across the open area between holes, a Viet Cong satchel charge exploded beside Staff Sergeant Joys, lifting him completely off the ground and slamming him down again. Bruised and battered, but undaunted, he picked himself up, retrieved his load and continued without hesitation. Constantly alert to the action within his perimeter, he saw a Corpsman hit while in an open area. Without thought of his personal safety, Staff Sergeant Joys raced through a rain of intensive enemy fire to bring the wounded man to shelter. Noting that the momentum of the enemy's assault was endangering the safety of tanks in his area, he immediately organized part of his platoon to counterattack the enemy from the flank. While leading the assault, Staff Sergeant Joys was wounded for the second time. Although seriously injured and in intense pain, he courageously pressed the attack, and continued to move from man to man, uttering encouragement, helping the wounded, and directing fire until he himself fell mortally wounded by an enemy hand grenade. As a result of his dynamic leadership and stirring personal example, the enemy was contained, and the perimeter restored. Staff Sergeant Joys' professional ability and unfaltering courage reflected great credit upon himself and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country.
Authority: Navy Department Board of Decorations and Medals
Home Town: San Francisco, California

*JUDGE, MARK WARREN
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Navy Cross (Posthumously) to Mark Warren Judge (2235869), Private First Class, U.S. Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism as a Rifleman with Company E, Second Battalion, Fourth Marines, THIRD Marine Division (Reinforced), Fleet Marine Force, in connection with operations against enemy forces in the Republic of Vietnam on 21 September 1967. Private First Class Judge was point man of the lead fire team on a search and destroy mission when the team came under attack from a well entrenched and concealed enemy force of an undetermined number. Wounded several times in the initial burst of enemy fire, Private First Class Judge instinctively returned their fire. During the following heavy exchange of fire he was again hit and, although seriously wounded, realized that the enemy was moving toward him from the flank, attempting to cut his team members off from their platoon. Private First Class Judge directed the other members to move back while he provided covering fire. As a result of his heroic action and fearless devotion to duty he eventually succumbed to his numerous wounds even while still unleashing a deadly hail of fire on the enemy. Through his extraordinary initiative and inspiring valor in the face of almost certain death, he saved his fellow Marines from injury and possible loss of life. Private First Class Judge's outstanding courage and devotion to duty reflected great credit upon himself and the Marine Corps, and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country.
Authority: Navy Department Board of Decorations and Medals
Home Town: Torrance, California

K

 

*KALER, RICHARD DAVID
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Navy Cross (Posthumously) to Richard David Kaler (2031739), Lance Corporal, U.S. Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism as a machine gunner with Company H, Second Battalion, Fourth Marines, THIRD Marine Division (Reinforced), Fleet Marine Force, near Cam Lo, Republic of Vietnam, on 21 July 1966. The company was engaged in a search and destroy mission during Operation HASTINGS when the point man of Corporal Kaler's platoon was fired upon and killed by an enemy machine gun. Disregarding his own personal safety, he immediately moved forward through the heavy fire and carried the body back. The following day, the platoon attacked the same position. When several machine guns opened fire cutting down several of his comrades and pinning the rest of the platoon, Corporal Kaler, knowing the hazards involved, without hesitation and in complete disregard for his own safety, exposed himself to the intense fire and charged the enemy positions. Receiving a bullet in the thigh, he nevertheless closed with the North Vietnamese, silencing one position before he was struck and mortally wounded by enemy fire. By his daring initiative, valiant fighting spirit and selfless devotion to duty in the face of insurmountable odds, Corporal Kaler was responsible in a great measure for saving many of his comrades and thereby upheld the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life in the cause of freedom.
Authority: Navy Department Board of Decorations and Medals
Home Town: Patchogue, New York

*KAUFMAN, DAVID MITCHELL
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Navy Cross (Posthumously) to David Mitchell Kaufman (1016850), First Sergeant, U.S. Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism while serving as First Sergeant of Company E, Second Battalion, Third Marines, THIRD Marine Division (Reinforced), Fleet Marine Force, in the Republic of Vietnam on 15 June 1969. While Company E was participating in a search and destroy operation in Cam Lo Valley, the Marines came under a heavy volume of North Vietnamese Army mortar, small arms, and rocket-propelled grenade fire and sustained numerous casualties. Completely disregarding his own safety, First Sergeant Kaufman unhesitatingly left his position of relative security to assist the Corpsman in treating the wounded men and, on several occasions, fearlessly crossed the fire-swept terrain to aid casualties to covered places. During the ensuing fierce engagement, First Sergeant Kaufman, seemingly oblivious to the hostile rounds impacting about him, boldly moved to vantage points and, in full view of enemy soldiers, encouraged his men and ensured that every possible avenue of approach was effectively covered with fire power. Then, as he dauntlessly moved from one fighting position to another along the company's defensive perimeter, exhorting his Marines to greater combat efforts, he was mortally wounded by North Vietnamese Army fire. By his courage, selfless concern for his fellowmen and unwavering devotion to duty, First Sergeant Kaufman upheld the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country.
Authority: Navy Department Board of Decorations and Medals
Home Town: Plaquemine, Louisiana

*KECK, RUSSELL FORREST
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Navy Cross (Posthumously) to Russell Forrest Keck (2201914), Corporal, U.S. Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism while serving as a Machine Gun Squad Leader with Company A, Battalion Landing Team 1/3, Ninth Marine Amphibious Brigade, in the Republic of Vietnam on 18 May 1967. During Operation BEAU CHARGER, in Quang Tin Province, Corporal Keek's squad was landed by helicopter into a heavily defended enemy position. Due to the large volume of intense enemy ground fire, the helicopters were forced to disperse over a wide area, causing the isolation of many small units. Finding himself and his gun team separated from the main body of his company, Corporal Keck quickly placed his guns into action. Observing one machine gun within hand grenade range of the teeming enemy trench lines, he rushed to the aid of his men under vicious enemy fire, finding one lone survivor. He quickly evaluated the situation and decided to move the gun to a safer position to keep it in action. While breaking the gun down into two groups, he was wounded by an enemy grenade. Disregarding his painful wounds, he quickly killed the enemy soldier who had thrown the grenade with an accurate burst of machine gun fire. Realizing that only one man could possibly make it back across the deadly fire-swept terrain, Corporal Keck ordered his gunner to return, while he gave covering fire. During this unselfish action, he was mortally wounded. By his courageous actions, bold initiative, intrepid fighting spirit and sincere concern for others, Corporal Keck reflected great credit upon himself and the Marine Corps, and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country.
Authority: Navy Department Board of Decorations and Medals
Home Town: Okmulgee, Oklahoma

KELLEY, EDWIN C., JR.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Navy Cross to Edwin C. Kelley, Jr. (104244), First Lieutenant, U.S. Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism while serving as Commanding Officer, Company M, Third Battalion, Fourth Marines, THIRD Marine Division (Reinforced), Fleet Marine Force, in connection with combat operations against the enemy in the Republic of Vietnam. On 13 March 1969, First Lieutenant Kelley was directed to retake Landing Zone Sierra near the demilitarized zone which had been previously abandoned by friendly forces and was subsequently occupied by a North Vietnamese Army force entrenched in well-fortified bunker complexes. After personally leading a reconnaissance patrol to within 100 meters of the hostile emplacements without detection, First Lieutenant Kelley formulated his plan of attack and initiated an aggressive assault on the enemy positions. During the ensuing protracted engagement, First Lieutenant Kelley directed his company in the destruction of a series of four bunker complexes without the aid of air support and with only limited artillery fire. When monsoon weather precluded helicopter re-supply, he instructed his Marines in the employment of captured North Vietnamese Army weapons and grenades for a final assault against the remaining hostile fortification, thereby enabling his company to seize the objective and establish defensive positions. During the night, the Marines were subjected to a series of probing assaults, which increased in intensity until the early morning hours when the enemy penetrated a sector of the perimeter. First Lieutenant Kelley fearlessly led a bold counterattack resulting in the defeat of the North Vietnamese Army force. His heroic actions and aggressive leadership inspired all who observed him and were instrumental in defeating the tenacious hostile unit. By his courage, superb tactical skill, and unwavering devotion to duty in the face of grave personal danger, First Lieutenant Kelley contributed significantly to the accomplishment of his unit's mission and upheld the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and the United States Naval Service.
Authority: Navy Department Board of Decorations and Medals
Home Town: Schillington, Pennsylvania

*KELLY, JAMES RAYMOND, III
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Navy Cross (Posthumously) to James Raymond Kelly, III (2040353), Corporal, U.S. Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism while serving as a grenadier with Company I, Third Battalion, Third Marines, THIRD Marine Division (Reinforced), Fleet Marine Force, in the Republic of Vietnam on 24 March 1967. During a search and destroy mission, Corporal Kelly's platoon was engaged in a heavily contested conflict against enemy forces. As his platoon entered the village of An Hoa, it became subjected to intense enemy mortar and automatic weapons fire, which inflicted numerous casualties upon the Marines. With complete disregard for his own safety and with full knowledge of the hazards involved, Corporal Kelly assaulted an enemy bunker single-handedly and destroyed it. The enemy then attempted to flank the Marine platoon with six men armed with automatic weapons. Utilizing a well camouflaged trenchline, the enemy was close to accomplishing their objective when Corporal Kelly suddenly observed their movement. He rushed forward in the face of certain death, killed three of the enemy and caused the remainder to flee. Mortally wounded during this action, Corporal Kelly by his bold initiative and selfless concern for others undoubtedly saved the lives of many of his comrades. His daring display of courage was responsible for the eventual successful accomplishment of the platoon's mission and an inspiration to all who observed him. Corporal Kelly's indomitable fighting spirit, professional skill and loyal devotion to duty reflected great credit upon himself and the Marine Corps and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country.
Authority: Navy Department Board of Decorations and Medals
Home Town: Sacramento, California

KELLY, ROBERT A.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Navy Cross to Robert A. Kelly (0-88103), First Lieutenant, U.S. Marine Corps (Reserve), for extraordinary heroism while serving as Executive Officer of Company I, Third Battalion, Ninth Marines, THIRD Marine Division (Reinforced), Fleet Marine Force, in the Republic of Vietnam on 3 and 5 September 1966. On 3 September, while commanding two Marine reaction forces, First Lieutenant Kelly directed an assault against a Viet Cong trench position; a number of the enemy were killed and some enemy weapons and equipment were captured. When a member of his squad was wounded by hostile fire, First Lieutenant Kelly requested helicopter evacuation. While the approaching rescue aircraft was subjected to heavy automatic weapons fire, he repeatedly exposed himself to direct the fire of his men, thereby diverting the enemy's attention and enabling the evacuation to be completed safely. On 5 September, he was serving as a Platoon Commander assigned to escort an Ontos to afford security on the left flank of a company sweep. Suddenly the left flank was engulfed in a barrage of mortar explosions, machine gun fire and hand grenades from a Viet Cong force later estimated at battalion strength. A mortar round exploded about five feet behind First Lieutenant Kelly, sending shrapnel through his hand and also wounding six other Marines. After quickly bandaging his own wounds he quickly gathered medical supplies and raced across the fire-torn field to one of his reaction forces which was pinned down by fire and taking casualties. After assisting the squad he returned to his original position and learning that an air strike was to be launched, he responded to a need for a machine gunner on the Ontos. While firing the weapon, First Lieutenant Kelly was hit by a ricocheting round in the shoulder and knocked from his post into the hatch. With grim determination, he regained his position and resumed his covering fire. During this gallant effort, he was hit twice more in the neck. Firmly aware of his responsibilities despite his intense suffering, he calmly radioed to the Company Command Post and forwarded a sound appraisal of the situation in his area before lapsing into unconsciousness. First Lieutenant Kelly's inspiring leadership, aggressive determination and valiant devotion to duty in the face of overwhelming odds were contributing factors in containing the hostile attack and thereby reflected the highest credit upon himself, the Marine Corps and the United States Naval Service.
Authority: Navy Department Board of Decorations and Medals
Home Town: Woonsocket, Rhode Island

KEMP, MARWICK L.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Navy Cross to Marwick L. Kemp (2017255), Staff Sergeant, U.S. Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism as a 3.5" Rocket Squad Leader attached to Third Platoon, Company E, Second Battalion, Fourth Marines, THIRD Marine Division (Reinforced), Fleet Marine Force, in the Republic of Vietnam on 21 March 1966. As the company was engaged in search and destroy operations against the communist insurgent forces in Quang Ngai Province, it moved across an open rice paddy area and approached to within thirty-five meters of a small village and was taken under fire from a large Viet Cong force emplaced in heavy fortifications and trench lines completely surrounding the village. The Third Platoon came under particularly devastating fire as it was completely exposed to the enemy's automatic weapons fire, mortar fire, and grenade attacks. Within seconds the platoon commander, the platoon sergeant, the platoon guide, and two rifle squad leaders had been wounded and were out of action. Sergeant Kemp moved to the commander's side and offered aid, but was instructed to take over the platoon and continue the attack. Exposing himself to intense enemy fire from several fortified positions, he quickly reorganized the squads. He then directed the continuation of the attack, exposing himself to urge his men forward until word came down from the company commander to withdraw from the village. Simultaneously directing fire on the enemy, conducting the evacuation of the wounded, and personally carrying other wounded back to safety, he unselfishly risked his life time after time to insure that the withdrawal was performed in an orderly manner and that each wounded man was brought back to safety. During this entire period, Sergeant Kemp performed his duties in a fashion that would be considered extremely exceptional for men of higher grade and experience. His tireless devotion to duty, his unswerving courage in the face of great danger, and his brilliant display of professional skill were responsible for the saving of many lives and were directly responsible for over sixty Viet Cong killed by his platoon. His actions upheld the finest traditions of the Marine Corp and the United States Naval Service.
Authority: Navy Department Board of Decorations and Medals
Home Town: Pensacola, Florida

*KENISON, BENJAMIN ALBERT
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Navy Cross (Posthumously) to Benjamin Albert Kenison (2098437), Corporal, U.S. Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism in connection with operations against enemy forces while serving as a squad leader with Company D, First Battalion, Fourth Marines, THIRD Marine Division (Reinforced), Fleet Marine Force, in the Republic of Vietnam on 16 September 1966. During Operation PRAIRIE, the Second Platoon was caught in an ambush. In the initial burst of fire a member of Lance Corporal Kenison's squad was seriously wounded. Realizing that the wounded Marine could not be left unattended, Lance Corporal Kenison quickly maneuvered his squad into a position from which they could best provide covering fire. Then, with full knowledge of the hazards involved and with complete disregard for his own personal safety, he bravely advanced alone by crawling up a steep slope and going forward in the face of withering enemy fire in order to bring his wounded comrade back to safety. Upon reaching the Marine who was receiving fire in an exposed area, Lance Corporal Kenison gallantly attempted to carry him back to safety. At this time both men were hit by an enemy hand grenade and mortally wounded. Lance Corporal Kenison's fearless courage, inspiring leadership and loyal devotion to duty reflected great credit upon himself and the Marine Corps and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country.
Authority: Navy Department Board of Decorations and Medals
Home Town: Jefferson, New Hampshire

KENNEDY, JOHNNIE M.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Navy Cross to Johnnie M. Kennedy (598516), Gunnery Sergeant, U.S. Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism while serving as a Light Weapons Infantry Advisor with the 39th Ranger Battalion, Army of the Republic of Vietnam, on 19 April 1965. While conducting a search and destroy mission four kilometers west of Thang Binh in Quang Tin Province, a composite battalion-size force of armored personnel carriers, Vietnamese Infantry and Marines located on the battalion's flank was routed by two Viet Cong battalions and began to withdraw through the Ranger Battalion area. Sergeant Kennedy left his protected position and attempted to stop the retreating friendly forces and establish them in defensive positions. Although the heavy enemy fire forced the regrouping of his position on three occasions, he unceasingly rallied the men around him and by his personal example inspired several of the Vietnamese officers to try to hold the withdrawing troops. During the action he personally inflicted 25 casualties among the enemy and saved 75 friendly troops from imminent capture. His cool and skillful leadership, indomitable fighting spirit and fearless devotion to duty reflected great credit upon himself and the Marine Corps and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.
Authority: Navy Department Board of Decorations and Medals
Home Town: Miami, Florida

KEYS, WILLIAM M.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Navy Cross to William M. Keys (0-79544), Captain, U.S. Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism as Commanding Officer, Company D, First Battalion, Ninth Marines, THIRD Marine Division (Reinforced), Fleet Marine Force, while engaged in action against elements of the North Vietnamese Army and insurgent communist (Viet Cong) forces during Operation PRAIRIE II in the Cam Lo district of the Republic of Vietnam on 2 March 1967. While on a search and destroy mission, Captain Keys' company made contact with a large enemy force estimated to be two companies in strength. During this contact, the company command post group received heavy automatic-weapons and mortar fire from the rear. Realizing that his rifle platoons were heavily engaged, Captain Keys organized his command group into an assault element and led them against the enemy, who were firing into his position. Personally leading his small group against a numerically superior force, he succeeded in completely overrunning the North Vietnamese, personally killing six and destroying a machine gun position. Immediately following this fire fight he rushed to the rear of his center platoon where he could best direct the deployment of his company. During the next four hours his company repelled attack after attack by a determined enemy. This period found Captain Keys along the entire line of his company, shouting encouragement, shifting forces to meet each new attack, and successfully directing all aspects of his company's firepower and supporting arms. Following the enemy's last attack, Captain Keys immediately reorganized his company and attacked the enemy before they could withdraw to a safe area. While completely overrunning the enemy camp, his company succeeded in killing 183 North Vietnamese soldiers and capturing eight prisoners and nearly 200 weapons. Realizing that the surviving enemy would attempt to circumvent his company during the oncoming darkness and escape to the north, Captain Keys placed his company in a blocking position, thereby forcing the enemy to withdraw into a prearranged zone where they were pounded by air and artillery resulting in 44 more enemy killed. As a result of his professional skill and stirring example, the enemy forces in his area of operations were completely routed. By his daring performance and loyal devotion to duty in the face of great personal risk, Captain Keys reflected great credit upon himself and the Marine Corps and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.
Authority: Navy Department Board of Decorations and Medals
Home Town: Frederickstown, Pennsylvania

*KOELPER, DONALD EDWARD
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Navy Cross (Posthumously) to Donald Edward Koelper (0-60953), Major [then Captain], U.S. Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism in connection with the bombing of the Capital Kinh-Do Theater in Saigon, Republic of Vietnam, on the evening of 16 February 1964, while serving as an Advisor attached to the Fourth Vietnamese Marine Corps Infantry Battalion. Upon becoming aware of a bomb being placed in the lobby of the theater, Major Koelper, who was standing nearby with a companion, unhesitatingly entered the main area of the theater and shouted to the occupants, United States servicemen and their dependents, to take cover. This warning provided the time for numerous unsuspecting individuals to obtain cover by lying between the rows of the seats. Seconds later the bomb exploded, fatally wounding Major Koelper and another person, and injuring approximately fifty others. Through his prompt and courageous actions in warning the theater patrons of the imminent explosion, Major Koelper undoubtedly saved many from serious injury or possible death. His self-sacrificing efforts were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.
Authority: Navy Department Board of Decorations and Medals
Home Town: Northbrook, Illinois

KOONTZ, LEONARD
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Navy Cross to Leonard Koontz (2395551), Corporal [then Lance Corporal], U.S. Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism while serving as a radio operator with Company M, Third Battalion, Fourth Marines, THIRD Marine Division (Reinforced), Fleet Marine Force, in the Republic of Vietnam on 27 May 1968. While Company M was on a patrol near the Khe Sanh Combat Base, Corporal Koontz' platoon became pinned down by intense automatic weapons fire from a large North Vietnamese Army force occupying fortified positions on the crest of Hill 542. Alertly locating the hostile defenses, Corporal Koontz gave his radio to another Marine and crawled across the fire-swept terrain toward the closest enemy fortification. Fearlessly moving on top of the North Vietnamese emplacement, he destroyed the bunker with a hand grenade, killing one enemy soldier. Immediately entering the remains of the position, Corporal Koontz killed a second North Vietnamese defender with his pistol. Pinpointing another hostile bunker from which enemy soldiers were throwing grenades at the Marines, he unhesitatingly assaulted the emplacement and, hurling hand grenades into the structure, killed its occupants. Realizing that the intense hostile fire was disrupting casualty evacuation efforts, he delivered suppressive fire against the enemy positions, enabling the Marines to assist their wounded comrades to positions of relative safety. Although partially dazed by an impacting North Vietnamese mortar round, he resolutely moved to aid two injured Marines and assisted them to a covered area. Returning to his dangerously exposed firing position, Corporal Koontz steadfastly continued to deliver effective fire upon the enemy until the last of his wounded companions had been evacuated. By his courage, aggressive fighting spirit and unwavering devotion to duty, Corporal Koontz was instrumental in saving several Marines from possible death or serious injury and by so doing he upheld the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and the United States Naval Service.
Authority: Navy Department Board of Decorations and Medals
Born: at Johnstown, Pennsylvania
Home Town: Johnstown, Pennsylvania

KORKOW, KENNETH A.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Navy Cross to Kenneth A. Korkow (2258125), Corporal, U.S. Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism while serving as Mortar Section Leader of Company B, First Battalion, Twenty-Sixth Marines, THIRD Marine Division (Reinforced), Fleet Marine Force, in the Republic of Vietnam on 30 March 1968. During a search and destroy operation in the vicinity of the Khe Sanh Combat Base, Company B suddenly came under intense small-arms and mortar fire from a well-entrenched North Vietnamese Army battalion. Fearlessly exposing himself to the hostile fire, Corporal Korkow quickly deployed his mortar section into firing positions and, moving about the fire-swept terrain from one squad to another, directed heavy barrages of accurate fire against the enemy, destroying four fortified bunkers. Alertly detecting a hidden mortar site which was pinning down elements of his company, he advanced to a position dangerously open to enemy fire and, employing his own mortar, single-handedly destroyed the hostile emplacement. As the battle intensified, Corporal Korkow repeatedly disregarded his own safety as he moved from one position to another, encouraging his men and directing their fire. Observing a Marine fall wounded by an enemy explosive device, he selflessly rushed into the hazardous area and assisted his injured comrade to an aid station established to the rear of his company. Although seriously wounded while returning to the forward area after assisting more casualties to the aid station, Corporal Korkow resolutely continued to encourage and assist his men and comfort the wounded until he was medically evacuated. His intrepid fighting spirit inspired all who observed him and contributed immeasurably to the final defeat of the numerically superior enemy force. By his uncommon valor and selfless devotion to duty in the face of extreme personal danger, Corporal Korkow reflected great credit upon himself and upheld the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and the United States Naval Service.
Authority: Navy Department Board of Decorations and Medals
Home Town: Blunt, South Dakota

KOWALYK, WILLIAM
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Navy Cross to William Kowalyk (2122016), Lance Corporal, U.S. Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism while serving with Battery G, Third Battalion, Twelfth Marines, THIRD Marine Division (Reinforced), Fleet Marine Force, during operations against the enemy near Cam Lo, Republic of Vietnam, on 26 August 1966. During the early morning Lance Corporal Kowalyk and two other Marines were manning a foxhole on the battalion perimeter when it was breached by a company of North Vietnamese Regulars. In the initial onslaught, all three men were wounded by a hand grenade. Although painfully wounded in the chest, arms, and face, Lance Corporal Kowalyk assured the others that he was not seriously hurt and continued to fire his weapon. The others noticed that he could barely lift his rifle and attempted to evacuate him, but he refused to be moved and selflessly resumed firing. Now surrounded, the two less seriously wounded Marines again took up their positions. At this time, unknown to the two, a North Vietnamese soldier leapt into the foxhole and attempted to strangle the nearly helpless Lance Corporal Kowalyk with a rope. Summoning all his strength, he threw off the attacker and, with a heroic effort, killed him with his rifle. Again his companions rushed to him and, realizing how badly he was hurt, evacuated him still protesting to the aid station. Through his daring and resolute determination he was instrumental in thwarting the enemy attack. By his courage, selfless actions, and inspiring devotion to duty, Lance Corporal Kowalyk reflected great credit upon himself and the Marine Corps and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.
Authority: Navy Department Board of Decorations and Medals
Home Town: Detroit, Michigan

*KUZMA, MARC JOHN
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Navy Cross (Posthumously) to Marc John Kuzma (2391847), Private First Class, U.S. Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism while serving as a Rifleman with Company A, First Battalion, Fourth Marines, THIRD Marine Division (Reinforced), Fleet Marine Force, in connection with operations against the enemy in the Republic of Vietnam. On 26 April 1968, Private Kuzma's squad was assigned to reconnoiter a suspected enemy bunker complex located west of Con Thien. As the Marines approached the designated area, they suddenly came under a heavy volume of hostile fire, and during the ensuing engagement, the squad's radio was severely damaged and rendered inoperable. Realizing the seriousness of the situation, Private Kuzma unhesitatingly exposed himself to the hostile fire in order to return to the platoon patrol base and guide reinforcements to the location of his besieged squad. Quickly leading the Marines to a location near the ambush site, he accurately pointed out friendly and enemy positions to his platoon commander. Disregarding his own safety, he then commenced moving toward his squad's position and, as he ran across a dangerously exposed area, came under fire from a hostile bunker. Reacting instantly, he threw a grenade into the emplacement, killing the enemy soldier defending the position. Continuing his movement, he simultaneously delivered a heavy volume of rifle fire which killed two additional North Vietnamese soldiers. Arriving at his unit's location, he was informed that several wounded Marines were lying forward of the squad's perimeter. Unhesitatingly moving toward his wounded comrades, he came under fire from another well fortified bunker. Maneuvering close to the emplacement, he threw a grenade into the position, killing another enemy soldier. Continuing toward his fallen comrades, he was again fired upon and rapidly returned accurate fire which killed the hostile soldier. Almost immediately, he received fire from his flank, and as he turned to direct fire upon the enemy he was mortally wounded. His heroic and timely actions inspired all who observed him and were instrumental in saving the lives of numerous Marines. By his courage, intrepid fighting spirit and selfless devotion to duty, Private Kuzma upheld the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country.
Authority: Navy Department Board of Decorations and Medals
Home Town: South Hadley Falls, Massachusetts

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