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Full Text Citations For Award of
 
The Navy Cross
US Marine Corps Awards - Vietnam 

To All Who Shall See These Presents Greeting:

This is to Certify that
The President of the United States of America
Takes Pride in Presenting


THE NAVY CROSS
to

SADLER, CHARLES D.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Navy Cross to Charles D. Sadler (2130908), Corporal, U.S. Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism as a Machine Gun Team Leader with the Third Platoon, Company A, First Battalion, Ninth Marines, THIRD Marine Division (Reinforced), Fleet Marine Force, in the Republic of Vietnam on 21 May 1966. Corporal Sadler's platoon participated in a heli-lift to a position in order to block the withdrawal of a large enemy force operating in the area. When the helicopters landed in an open rice paddy, the area was immediately subjected to intense mortar and automatic weapons fire from Viet Cong positioned on all sides of the landing zone. More than twenty Marine casualties were inflicted in the first few minutes of the savage action. With exceptional composure and presence of mind in the tense situation, Corporal Sadler quickly took charge of his team and began returning fire, fearlessly exposing himself to the enemy to accomplish his task. When supplies of ammunition were depleted, he directed Marines around him to retrieve that which had been carried by the casualties, and twice he braved the withering fire to recover ammunition from wounded men who were lying in the exposed rice paddy. On one occasion he spotted a Viet Cong running from a tree line with a machine gun and reacting instantly, Corporal Sadler stood in the midst of the grazing fire and fired his machine gun from an offhand position, felling the enemy. Finding that only Five other Marines in his immediate vicinity were not dead or wounded, he organized the small group and on two separate occasions attempted to mount an assault against the nearest Viet Cong position. Realizing the futility of further attempts, he judiciously directed the men to dig in and save two magazines of ammunition, ordered all rocket misfires to be stacked in the position for last second detonation, and instructed his men to stand by for a probably physical assault by the enemy. His daring initiative and relentless fighting spirit served to inspire and encourage all who observed him, and were instrumental in preventing the enemy from overrunning the position. His resolute effort contributed in large measure to the eventual entrapment of the enemy force, resulting in fifty-three Viet Cong killed and seventeen weapons captured. By his extraordinary courage in the face of extreme danger, bold initiative, and unwavering dedication to duty throughout, Corporal Sadler upheld the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and the United States Naval Service.
Authority: Navy Department Board of Decorations and Medals
Home Town: St. Louis, Missouri

*SAMPSON, GERALD HILBERT
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Navy Cross (Posthumously) to Gerald Hilbert Sampson (245607597), Captain, U.S. Marine Corps (Reserve), for extraordinary heroism while serving as Commanding Officer of Company B, First Battalion, Third Marines, THIRD Marine Division (Reinforced), Fleet Marine Force, in connection with combat operations against the enemy in the Republic of Vietnam. In the early morning hours of 28 August 1969, Company B, occupying a night defensive position deep in hostile territory northwest of Cam Lo, was assaulted by a large North Vietnamese Army force employing automatic weapons and rocket-propelled grenades. In the initial onslaught, the second platoon commander was wounded and his sector of the perimeter was in grave danger of being breached by the enemy. With complete disregard for his own safety, Captain Sampson moved across the fire-swept terrain to the point of heaviest contact, rallied the beleaguered Marines, and began to direct their fire against the advancing North Vietnamese. During the fierce fire fight, he continually moved from one fighting position to another, instructing and encouraging his men and ensuring that the wounded received immediate treatment. While maneuvering across an exposed area on the foremost edge of the perimeter, Captain Sampson was mortally wounded by enemy fire. His unflagging determination and bold fighting spirit inspired his men to heroic efforts and were instrumental in turning a critical situation into an overwhelming Marine victory. By his leadership, extraordinary courage and selfless devotion to duty, Captain Sampson upheld the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and of the United States Naval Service.
Authority: Navy Department Board of Decorations and Medals
Home Town: Williamsport, Pennsylvania

*SANDERS, THOMAS
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Navy Cross (Posthumously) to Thomas Sanders (2169627), Corporal, U.S. Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism as a Machine Gun Squad Leader with Company C, Battalion Landing Team 1/3, in the Republic of Vietnam on 10 May 1967. While participating in Operation BEAVER CAGE, in Tinh, Quang Nam Province, Corporal Sanders enabled his platoon to move from positions exposed to heavy automatic and small arms fire, to a protected trench line, by advancing himself to an exposed position with his squad's machine gun when all other members of the squad became casualties. He then placed a heavy volume of accurate fire on Viet Cong and North Vietnamese Army troops causing them to cease fire. When the enemy troops advanced to the cover of the trench line, in which other members of his platoon were located, he placed himself between the enemy and friendly troops. As the enemy approached to within six meters in front of him, Corporal Sanders delivered machine gun fire down the long axis of the trench line killing approximately two of them and wounding three others before he was killed by enemy fire. As a result of his heroic conduct and fearless devotion to duty, his actions enabled nine Marines, some of whom were wounded, to gain cover in the trench line and to gain positions where grenades and M-79 fire could be delivered on the enemy. By his outstanding courage, exceptional fortitude and valiant fighting spirit, Corporal Sanders served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country.
Authority: Navy Department Board of Decorations and Medals
Home Town: East Elmhurst, New York

*SARGENT, GEORGE THOMAS, JR.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Navy Cross (Posthumously) to George Thomas Sargent, Jr. (0-51686), Lieutenant Colonel, U.S. Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism while serving as Commanding Officer of the First Battalion, Fourth Marines, THIRD Marine Division (Reinforced), Fleet Marine Force, in connection with operations against the enemy in the Republic of Vietnam. On 20 March 1969, Lieutenant Colonel Sargent was in command of a heliborne attack against enemy positions in Quang Nam Province during Operation PURPLE MARTIN when the lead helicopter came under a heavy volume of North Vietnamese Army fire, causing it to crash in the landing zone. Directing the debarkation of the battalion at a smaller zone on the slope of a hill below the designated area, Lieutenant Colonel Sargent took command of the lead company, and after starting up the hill, the Marines encountered a hostile force occupying a well-fortified position. As he led his men in an aggressive assault against the enemy emplacements, Lieutenant Colonel Sargent observed a machine gun which was pinning down a portion of his unit. Fearlessly moving across the fire-swept terrain toward the North Vietnamese emplacement, he boldly hurled several hand grenades, which killed two hostile soldiers and destroyed the enemy weapon. Skillfully maneuvering his men, he secured the slope of the hill, and early the following morning, despite a fragmentation wound sustained during the previous day's engagement, commenced the final assault against the enemy soldiers. During the ensuing fire fight, the Marines were subjected to intense North Vietnamese mortar and small-arms fire and rocket propelled grenades. Ignoring the hostile rounds impacting near him, Lieutenant Colonel Sargent remained with the forward units, effectively controlling the actions of his men and exploiting every enemy contact to the maximum extent until he was mortally wounded. His timely actions and aggressive leadership inspired all who observed him and were instrumental in the accomplishment of his unit's mission. By his courage, intrepid fighting spirit, and unwavering devotion to duty, Lieutenant Colonel Sargent upheld the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country.
Authority: Navy Department Board of Decorations and Medals
Home Town: Auburn, Alabama

*SCHLEY, ROBERT JAMES
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Navy Cross (Posthumously) to Robert James Schley (2162020), Corporal, U.S. Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism while serving as a Machine Gun Team Leader with Company M, Third Battalion, Third Marines, THIRD Marine Division (Reinforced), Fleet Marine Force, in the vicinity of Khe Sanh, Quang Tri Province, Republic of Vietnam, on 30 April 1967. During a search and destroy mission, Company M was assigned the mission of seizing and securing Hill 881, a strategic area commanding the approaches into the Khe Sanh complex. While advancing on the numerically stronger, well-trained and equipped enemy in fortified positions, Corporal Schley's squad was taken under a heavy volume of intense and accurate enemy fire. Realizing the necessity of immediate counter action to suppress enemy fire, he unhesitatingly advanced to position himself and his machine gun team where they could deliver the most effective fire on the enemy. Due to his accurate and well controlled fire, Corporal Schley was able to inflict numerous casualties upon the enemy. As the intensity of the conflict increased and the ammunition depleted, he exposed himself to intense enemy fire to re- supply the gun. Painfully wounded in the shoulder during this task, he refused medical attention and evacuation to return to his machine gun and continue firing. Wounded a second time and finding himself the only member of his team able to fight, he bravely continued to man his weapon until he succumbed to his wounds. By his dauntless courage, initiative and indomitable fighting spirit, he served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country.
Authority: Navy Department Board of Decorations and Medals
Home Town: Oregon, Wisconsin

SCHREIBER, KLAUS D.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Navy Cross to Klaus D. Schreiber (100653), First Lieutenant [then Second Lieutenant], U.S. Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism as a Patrol Leader with Company C, First Reconnaissance Battalion, FIRST Marine Division (Reinforced), Fleet Marine Force, in Thua Thien Province, Republic of Vietnam, on 14 October 1967. While he was leading a twelve-man reconnaissance patrol, north of DaNang, First Lieutenant Schreiber's patrol came under a devastating machine-gun and automatic weapons attack from a numerically superior enemy force. The initial burst of fire killed two men and wounded another. He repeatedly exposed himself to the heavy enemy fire to position his men on line and direct their fire. With complete disregard for his own safety, he crawled forward, through the intense enemy fire to bring back a fellow comrade who was mortally wounded. When his radio operator was wounded, First Lieutenant Schreiber took over the radio and established communications and tended the wounded man. Hearing the cries of the frenzied Viet Cong, he ordered his men to deliver full automatic fire into the oncoming enemy hordes. Observing that he was in the most advantageous position to throw hand grenades, he ordered his men to pass their grenades to him, and standing upright, in full view of the enemy, hurled grenade after grenade into the frenzied enemy charge. Again, with complete disregard for his own safety, he stood up to pinpoint his position, amidst the enemy fire, enabling aircraft to bombard the enemy positions. He called in napalm and strafing runs to within 25 meters of his position in an attempt to neutralize the enemy force, which was trying to penetrate his defensive position. For eight more hours, he directed earth-shattering air support around his position, and the explosions from their ordnance hurled his men to the ground. As the aircraft ordnance rocked the enemy positions, an attempt was made for medical evacuation of the casualties, but because of intense ground fire, he was forced to expose himself to enemy fire to warn off approaching aircraft. As a company-sized reaction force pushed forward into his position, he directed their fire and advance upon the enemy positions. By his bold initiative, gallant fighting spirit and loyal devotion to duty, First Lieutenant Schreiber was instrumental in defeating an estimated battalion of North Vietnamese regulars, reflecting great credit upon himself and the Marine Corps and upholding the finest traditions of the United States Naval Service.
Authority: Navy Department Board of Decorations and Medals
Home Town: Dortmund, Germany

SCHUNCK, HENRY M.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Navy Cross to Henry M. Schunck (2248186), Corporal, U.S. Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism while serving as a Field Artillery Batteryman with Battery D, Second Battalion, Thirteenth Marines, FIRST Marine Division (Reinforced), Fleet Marine Force, in connection with operations against the enemy in the Republic of Vietnam. On 10 May 1968, Corporal Schunck was a member of a detachment of two howitzers at the United States Army Special Forces camp at Ngok Tavak in Quang Tin Province. In the early morning hours, the camp was attacked by a reinforced North Vietnamese Army battalion which attempted to overrun the hill-top position. Corporal Schunck unhesitatingly left his covered post adjacent to the command bunker and moved under intense fire to the 4.2-inch mortar emplacement in the center of the compound. Although wounded in the leg by grenade fragments en route, he resolutely continued to the mortar position and attempted to deliver mortar fire single-handedly. Suddenly, he was attacked by a North Vietnamese soldier armed with a flamethrower. Reacting instantly, Corporal Schunck mortally wounded the enemy with accurate rifle fire and then left the mortar emplacement to assist a comrade who had been wounded while attempting to reach the mortar. After moving the casualty to a covered position, he shifted to the 81-mm. mortar, and with the aid of a companion, directed a heavy volume of fire against the attackers, inflicting several casualties as they launched a concentrated attack on his position. Although wounded a second time by grenade fragments, he selflessly disregarded his painful injuries in order to continue bringing effective fire to bear against the hostile force until his supply of ammunition was expended. Leaving the emplacement, he moved along his unit's defenses, distributing ammunition and moving casualties to the Fire Direction Center bunker for treatment. Throughout the remainder of the engagement, until the enemy had been repulsed, he continued to move along the defensive lines, encouraging and directing his companions. Then, weakened from his wounds and near exhaustion, he accepted evacuation. By his uncommon courage, unfaltering determination, and selfless devotion to duty at great personal risk, Corporal Schunck upheld the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and the United States Naval Service.
Authority: Navy Department Board of Decorations and Medals
Home Town: San Francisco, California

SCOTT, DONALD W.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Navy Cross to Donald W. Scott (1539245), Sergeant, U.S. Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism while serving with Company D, First Battalion, Twenty-Sixth Marines, THIRD Marine Division (Reinforced), Fleet Marine Force, in the Republic of Vietnam on 18 September 1966. As the company approached the village of Gia Binh, the point was taken under attack and sustained many casualties; the platoon commander was killed. After surveying the situation, Sergeant Scott reacted quickly and alertly and without regard for his own personal safety as he moved forward to aid the fallen men. Subjected to intense fire from enemy automatic small-arms directed upon the wounded men, Sergeant Scott, on six separate occasions, courageously worked his way up through the hail of enemy fire and retrieved his dead and wounded comrades. When he himself was painfully wounded, he refused medical attention and went back to retrieve the last of his dead men. On his last trip into the village he was again wounded, but continued on beyond the point required by duty and succeeded in recovering the body of a fellow Marine. Through his daring and courageous actions in the face of almost certain death, and while seriously wounded, Sergeant Scott personally saved the lives of three Marines, and recovered the bodies of three of his fallen comrades. By his daring initiative, valiant fighting spirit and selfless devotion to duty, Sergeant Scott reflected great credit upon himself and the Marine Corps and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.
Authority: Navy Department Board of Decorations and Medals
Home Town: Birmingham, Alabama

SEE, ROGER D.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Navy Cross to Roger D. See (2382260), Corporal, U.S. Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism in action as a Patrol Leader with Company A, Third Reconnaissance Battalion, THIRD Marine Division (Reinforced), Fleet Marine Force, during combat operations against the enemy in the Republic of Vietnam. On 8 June 1969, while his six-man reconnaissance team was establishing an observation post, Corporal See observed two enemy soldiers in proximity to the Marine position and took them under fire. During the exchange of fire both enemy soldiers were wounded, one of whom was captured by Corporal See. With the enemy force now in close pursuit, Corporal See picked up the wounded prisoner and began carrying him to the helicopter extraction site. During this action, he was wounded in the thigh, but managed to regain his feet and continue toward the extraction site. When another Marine coming to his assistance was seriously wounded, Corporal See remained in a dangerously exposed position to treat his companion's wounds and to administer mouth-to-mouth resuscitation in a futile effort to save the man's life. After his comrade succumbed to his wounds, Corporal See seized the grenade launcher the Marine had been carrying and delivered covering fire for his men. When he had expended all the grenades, he utilized his rifle and a weapon dropped by an enemy soldier until he had fired every round available, and then painfully maneuvered to join his team on the hill. As the unit attempted to attain the crest, the Marines were subjected to intense fire from a bunker position. Corporal See crawled across an exposed area and silenced the fire by dropping a fragmentation grenade through an aperture at the top of the position. When an extraction helicopter arrived on station and approached for a landing, intensified fire from hostile positions around the hill forced the pilot to lift off. Until the early morning hours of the following day when a successful extraction became possible, Corporal See, despite the pain of his wound, continually patrolled the defensive perimeter to encourage his men, ascertain their welfare and direct their fire. By his courage, valiant leadership, and unfaltering devotion to duty in the face of seemingly overwhelming odds, he contributed significantly to the accomplishment of his unit's intelligence mission and upheld the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and the United States Naval Service.
Authority: Navy Department Board of Decorations and Medals
Home Town: Indianapolis, Indiana

SEXTON, CHARLES T.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Navy Cross to Charles T. Sexton (2461865), Corporal, U.S. Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism while serving as a Radio Operator with the Third Force Reconnaissance Company, Third Marine Amphibious Force, in connection with combat operations against the enemy in the Republic of Vietnam. On 5 February 1970, Corporal Sexton was a member of a six-man reconnaissance team which was patrolling deep in the A Shau Valley when it came under a heavy volume of small arms and automatic weapons fire from approximately fifty enemy soldiers occupying well-concealed emplacements in the dense elephant grass. During the initial moments of the attack, three Marines were mortally wounded and two were seriously wounded. After a rapid assessment of the precarious situation, Corporal Sexton directed the fire of his two wounded companions and moved about the fire-swept area to collect hand grenades and ammunition from his fallen comrades. Utilizing his radio, he then reported the situation to his commanding officer and requested assistance. For the next several hours, while the enemy attempted to encircle and overrun his position, Corporal Sexton repeatedly adjusted helicopter and fixed-wing air strikes on the hostile unit, hurled hand grenades, shouted encouragement to his wounded companions, and simultaneously furnished a running commentary to his company commander until a reaction force arrived to lend support. His heroic and determined actions were an inspiration to all who served with him and undoubtedly saved his fellow Marines from further serious injury or even death. By his courage, superb leadership, and valiant devotion to duty in the face of grave personal danger, Corporal Sexton upheld the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and the United States Naval Service.
Authority: Navy Department Board of Decorations and Medals
Home Town: Columbia, South Carolina

SEXTON, HARRY E.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Navy Cross to Harry E. Sexton (0-64225), Lieutenant Colonel, U.S. Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism while serving as Commanding Officer of Marine Light Helicopter Squadron THREE HUNDRED SIXTY-SEVEN (HML-367), Marine Aircraft Group SIXTEEN, First Marine Aircraft Wing in connection with combat operations against the enemy in the Republic of Vietnam. On 11 September 1970, Lieutenant Colonel Sexton launched as Flight Leader of a flight of nine helicopters assigned the mission of inserting a friendly force into a mountainous area deep in enemy-controlled territory which was heavily defended by enemy antiaircraft weapons. Shortly after arriving over the designated area, the entire flight came under an extremely heavy volume of enemy fire, damaging each of the gunships and the lead transport. Lieutenant Colonel Sexton maneuvered his aircraft on repeated rocket and strafing runs and led his flight in delivering such devastatingly effective strikes upon the hostile positions that the enemy fire was suppressed sufficiently to enable the friendly force to be safely inserted. By 13 September, the ground unit had sustained approximately twenty casualties while heavily engaged with a North Vietnamese Army force and requested an emergency extraction. Returning to the beleaguered unit, Lieutenant Colonel Sexton braved the intense hostile fire as he skillfully coordinated the extraction efforts of twenty-two Marine and United States Army and Air Force aircraft which resulted in the safe medical evacuation of all of the casualties and the extraction of the crew of one of the transports which was forced to land in a nearby open area when severely damaged by enemy fire. When it became apparent the following day that the ground force required an immediate extraction, Lieutenant Colonel Sexton expertly directed the laying down of smoke screens and the rocket and strafing runs of his gunship helicopters, thereby enabling the transports to enter the dangerous area and safely extract the friendly force. Although his helicopter was seriously damaged by hostile fire, he resolutely remained in the battle area until his extraction mission was completed and then skillfully maneuvered his crippled aircraft to safety. By his dauntless courage, superb airmanship, and unwavering devotion to duty in the face of great personal danger, Lieutenant Colonel Sexton upheld the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and of the United States Naval Service.
Authority: Navy Department Board of Decorations and Medals
Home Town: Anaheim, California

SEXTON, MERLYN A.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Navy Cross to Merlyn A. Sexton (0-91890), Captain, U.S. Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism while serving as Commanding Officer, Company I, Third Battalion, Fourth Marines, THIRD Marine Division (Reinforced), Fleet Marine Force, in connection with operations against the enemy in the Republic of Vietnam from 19 June to 8 July 1968. Captain Sexton was assigned to defend a ridgeline overlooking National Route One approximately 2,000 meters southeast of the Khe Sanh Combat Base. Despite sporadic mortar and artillery attacks, he established a strong perimeter, developed a fire plan, and conducted offensive patrols throughout the surrounding area. On the night of 30 June, when his position came under attack by a numerically superior North Vietnamese Army force supported by rocket, artillery, and mortar fire, Captain Sexton quickly directed well coordinated supporting arms fire against the hostile positions and consolidated his perimeter. When the enemy penetrated a sector of the protective wire, he fearlessly moved to the point of heaviest contact, rallied his men, and directed their fire against the enemy. Disregarding his own safety, he skillfully adjusted highly accurate artillery fire around the perimeter, forcing the hostile force to break contact and withdraw. Throughout the night, Captain Sexton continued to direct supporting arms fire against the retreating enemy and, on the following morning, dispatched patrols to search out and destroy hidden hostile positions. During the day, he adjusted air strikes by helicopter gunships and fixed-wing aircraft against the enemy's withdrawal routes until assured that his vital position was secure. His sustained heroism in the face of a numerically superior, determined North Vietnamese Army force inspired all who observed him and contributed immeasurably to his unit accounting for 212 North Vietnamese soldiers confirmed killed and 77 weapons seized. By his courage, intrepid fighting spirit, and unwavering devotion to duty at great personal risk, Captain Sexton upheld the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and the United States Naval Service.
Authority: Navy Department Board of Decorations and Medals
Home Town: Chamberlain, South Dakota

*SHERMAN, ANDREW MARCO
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Navy Cross (Posthumously) to Andrew Marco Sherman (0-97870), Second Lieutenant, U.S. Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism as Platoon Commander, Second Platoon, Company E, Second Battalion, Fourth Marines, THIRD Marine Division (Reinforced), Fleet Marine Force, northwest of Cam Lo in Quang Tri Province, Republic of Vietnam, on 8 August 1966. In carrying out its assigned mission of assisting in the evacuation of a reconnaissance team which was surrounded by North Vietnamese, Second Lieutenant Sherman's platoon was attacked on two sides in great strength and rapidly encircled; heavy automatic weapons fire and grenades inflicted fifty percent casualties upon them. With the North Vietnamese force threatening to overrun the position, Second Lieutenant Sherman, with complete disregard for his own safety, moved about through extremely heavy rifle and automatic weapons fire in full view of the enemy, directing the fire fight and giving encouragement to his men. The viciousness of the assault by the North Vietnamese pushed the defenders into tenuous secondary positions. Second Lieutenant Sherman, undeterred by the five-to-one odds, rallied his remaining men and led a counterattack back across forty meters of open, fire-swept terrain, and regained the original positions. By this time, the force had suffered sixty percent casualties and the situation was deteriorating rapidly. Repeated attempts at evacuation were thwarted by the loss of four helicopters. Second Lieutenant Sherman bravely continued to move from position to position deploying his weapon, and shouting orders and words of encouragement until he was mortally wounded. By his valiant leadership, outstanding courage, and stirring example in the face of tremendous odds, he inspired his men and gave them the spirit to repulse the enemy and crush the attack. His steadfast devotion to duty was in keeping with the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country.
Authority: Navy Department Board of Decorations and Medals
Home Town: Doylestown, Ohio

*SIPPLE, CONRAD ALAN
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Navy Cross (Posthumously) to Conrad Alan Sipple (2043729), Corporal, U.S. Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism as a Squad Leader with Company C, Second Battalion, Fourth Marines, THIRD Marine Division (Reinforced), Fleet Marine Force, in the Republic of Vietnam, on 5 March 1966. The company was engaged in operations against insurgent communist forces in the vicinity of An Tuyet, Quang Ngai Province, when Corporal Sipple's platoon came under extremely heavy small-arms and automatic weapons fire from Viet Cong forces entrenched on a commanding ridgeline. Numerous casualties were inflicted on the platoon and many fell in areas exposed to annihilating fire. With full knowledge of the hazards involved and with complete disregard for his own safety, Corporal Sipple braved the fierce, hostile fire repeatedly to assist in the evacuation of wounded Marines. Oblivious to the unrelenting fusillade of automatic weapons fire, he braved the storm alone on two occasions to assist wounded comrades to safety. On two other occasions he returned into the vicious enemy fire to assist others in the evacuation of seriously wounded comrades who had to be carried bodily from the extremely hazardous area. On his fourth sally into the furious hail of enemy fire he was mortally wounded. Through his outstanding initiative and inspiring valor in the face of great personal risk he saved his comrades from further injury or possible loss of life. He gallantly gave his life in the cause of freedom.
Authority: Navy Department Board of Decorations and Medals
Home Town: Salem, Indiana

*SIROUSA, MICHAEL ANGELO
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Navy Cross (Posthumously) to Michael Angelo Sirousa (332383951), Private First Class, U.S. Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism while serving as a Squad Leader with Company C, First Battalion, Seventh Marines, FIRST Marine Division (Reinforced), Fleet Marine Force, in connection with combat operations against the enemy in the Republic of Vietnam. On 12 February 1970, Company C was moving as a reaction force to support another Marine unit which was heavily engaged in combat with a hostile force in Quang Nam Province. While moving across a stream, the point squad came under intense small arms and automatic weapons fire from an enemy unit well entrenched on the opposite bank, wounding several Marines and pinning the squad down on a sandbar in the middle of the stream. Reacting instantly, Private First Class Sirousa skillfully maneuvered his squad to firing positions along the river bank and directed the delivery of maximum fire at the enemy positions. Realizing that the amount of fire delivered by Marines along the bank was insufficient to suppress the hostile fire, he gathered as many hand grenades as he could carry and rushed across the stream in a valiant one-man assault on the enemy positions. Firing his rifle and hurling hand grenades, he continued his gallant efforts, despite the concentration of hostile fire directed at him, until he was mortally wounded. His dauntless fighting spirit inspired all who observed him and was greatly instrumental in the defeat of the enemy. By his courage, bold initiative, and unwavering devotion to duty, Private First Class Sirousa upheld the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life in the service of his country.
Authority: Navy Department Board of Decorations and Medals
Home Town: Chicago, Illinois

*SKIBBE, DAVID WILLIAM
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Navy Cross (Posthumously) to David William Skibbe (332388613), Second Lieutenant, U.S. Marine Corps (Reserve), for extraordinary heroism while serving as a Platoon Commander with Company C, First Reconnaissance Battalion, FIRST Marine Division (Reinforced), Fleet Marine Force, in connection with combat operations against the enemy in the Republic of Vietnam. On 2 March 1970, while Second Lieutenant Skibbe was leading a patrol deep in enemy-controlled territory, the team came under a heavy volume of fire from a large hostile force. During the initial moments of the engagement, Second Lieutenant Skibbe observed a wounded man fall in a forward position, and unhesitatingly placed himself between the casualty and enemy soldiers to deliver intense covering fire which forced the enemy momentarily to break contact and enabled the Marines to move the wounded man to a more secure location. While the radio operator was requesting fixed-wing air support, the enemy launched a ground assault in an attempt to overrun the Marine position. Despite the hostile rounds impacting around him, Second Lieutenant Skibbe exposed himself to the enemy fire to direct the defensive activities of his men and, while thus engaged, was severely wounded in the ankle. Although suffering intense pain and unable to walk, he nevertheless skillfully directed the bombing and strafing runs of supporting aircraft with such accuracy that the hostile soldiers broke contact and retreated, thereby enabling a medical evacuation helicopter to come to a safe hover overhead. As Second Lieutenant Skibbe was being hoisted toward the aircraft, the hoist apparatus sustained a malfunction, and he was mortally injured when he fell to the ground. His heroic and determined actions throughout this mission contributed significantly to the defeat of the numerically superior enemy force. By his courage, valiant leadership, and unwavering devotion to duty in the face of grave personal danger, Second Lieutenant Skibbe upheld the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life in the service of his country.
Authority: Navy Department Board of Decorations and Medals
Home Town: Des Plaines, Illinois

SKWERES, JEFF C.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Navy Cross to Jeff C. Skweres, Corporal, U.S. Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism while serving with Marine Medium Helicopter Squadron THREE HUNDRED SIXTY-FOUR (HMM-364), Marine Aircraft Group SIXTEEN, First Marine Aircraft Wing, in connection with combat operations against the enemy in the Republic of Vietnam. On the evening of 1 June 1970, Corporal Skweres launched as an Aerial Gunner aboard a transport helicopter assigned the medical evacuation of several Marine casualties who had been extensively wounded by enemy mines. Arriving over the designated location, he observed that, when the tall elephant grass was parted by the downdraft from the rotor blades, the entire field was literally seeded with mines. Despite this extreme hazard, Corporal Skweres unhesitatingly volunteered to execute a bold and imaginative plan whereby he would be lowered on the hoist, wait on the spot while a wounded man was lifted to the aircraft and then board the hoist to be moved to where the next casualty lay. For approximately an hour, Corporal Skweres valiantly moved from one stricken man to another in performing his rescue mission. With the fall of darkness, it was necessary to utilize the exterior lights to aid in his examination of the casualties and he thus became a vulnerable target for automatic weapons and rocket propelled grenade fire which enemy soldiers delivered from several different directions. Undaunted by this additional adversity, he steadfastly continued his determined efforts with calm deliberation until all casualties had been embarked and the transport helicopter was directed toward the nearest medical facilities at DaNang. By his courage, inspiring initiative, and unfaltering devotion to duty in the face of grave personal danger, Corporal Skweres was instrumental in accomplishing an extremely dangerous lifesaving mission and upheld the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and of the United States Naval Service.
Authority: Navy Department Board of Decorations and Medals
Home Town: Madera, California

SLATER, ALBERT C., JR.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Navy Cross to Albert C. Slater, Jr. (0-84435), Captain, U.S. Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism as Commanding Officer, Company A, First Battalion, Ninth Marines, THIRD Marine Division (Reinforced), Fleet Marine Force, during Operation BUFFALO in the Republic of Vietnam on 6 - 7 July 1967. In command of both Companies A and C, Captain Slater moved his forces into a strategic position north of Con Thien. Shortly before dark, the companies came under extremely heavy barrages of enemy artillery and mortars. During the barrages, Captain Slater fearlessly maneuvered his command into a perimeter where it could counter the attack he was certain would come. With full knowledge of the hazards involved, he ignored the heavy barrages of enemy artillery and personally checked each position to insure that they were secure. When the attack came, by an estimated two battalions of the North Vietnamese Army, Captain Slater unhesitatingly moved to an exposed position where he could properly control the situation. He repeatedly exposed himself to the withering enemy fire in order to better observe the air and artillery support he coordinated for his now surrounded command. For six hours, Captain Slater, with complete disregard for his own personal safety and with full composure and presence of mind, moved from one exposed position to another, giving encouragement and directing the men of his command. He aggressively employed all available fire and personally led his men in hand-to-hand combat through extremely dense underbrush which reduced the action to a man-to-man struggle. Throughout the entire night, Captain Slater, although constantly exposed to enemy artillery, mortars, grenades, and small-arms fire, was always at a strategic point of contact directing his unit and encouraging his men. By his courage, tenacity, and outstanding leadership, Captain Slater brought stability to an otherwise untenable situation, which resulted in at least two hundred North Vietnamese regulars killed with small losses to his command. Captain Slater's daring actions and loyal devotion to duty in the face of great personal risk reflected great credit upon himself and the Marine Corps and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.
Authority: Navy Department Board of Decorations and Medals
Home Town: Venice, California

SLATER, ROBERT M. S.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Navy Cross to Robert M. S. Slater (0-99864), First Lieutenant, U.S. Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism as a Staff Advisor, U.S. Marine Corps, in the Republic of Vietnam from 5 to 11 January 1968. Lieutenant Slater, at the risk of his life, above and beyond the call of duty, volunteered to undertake a hazardous mission into enemy territory to gather vital intelligence. On 6 January he was inserted for the first time and successfully brought back essential intelligence. Due to the success of his first mission, he volunteered to go back a second time for additional information. With full knowledge of the continuing possibility of imminent capture or death, he returned again into enemy territory and brought back a great amount of invaluable intelligence. With great courage, he returned for a third and final mission. Although his chances for survival were slim he again successfully brought back the vitally needed intelligence. Lieutenant Slater's extraordinary heroism resulted in extremely heavy materiel damage and personnel casualties to the enemy and led to the saving of many American and South Vietnamese lives, both military and civilian. His courageous actions and loyal devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and the United States Naval Service.
Authority: Navy Department Board of Decorations and Medals
Home Town: Buffalo, New York

*SLEIGH, DUNCAN BALFOUR
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Navy Cross (Posthumously) to Duncan Balfour Sleigh (0-105657), Second Lieutenant, U.S. Marine Corps (Reserve), for extraordinary heroism as a platoon commander in Company M, Third Battalion, Seventh Marines, FIRST Marine Division (Reinforced), Fleet Marine Force, in Quang Nam Province, Republic of Vietnam, on 6 November 1968. The company advanced in a sweep operation south of Hill 55 where it encountered a large North Vietnamese Army force and sustained heavy casualties at the first bitter engagement. The well entrenched enemy kept the company pinned down with rocket propelled grenades and heavy small-arms and automatic-weapons fire, making evacuation of casualties a hazardous chore. As the company pressed the attack, the wounded and dead were moved toward the rear where Second Lieutenant Sleigh was directing the establishment of a landing zone. Taking charge of the critical situation, Second Lieutenant Sleigh strategically deployed his men to return suppressive fire and at the same time maintained control of the evacuation. Two helicopter landings were attempted, and on the second effort a rocket propelled grenade landed near the wounded who were being treated. Observing the danger to the wounded, Second Lieutenant Sleigh crawled to one casualty and lay huddled over him as a shield when another rocket propelled grenade landed less than a meter away, instantly killing Second Lieutenant Sleigh. He thus absorbed most of the shock with his body, not only saving the life of one Marine, but also preventing injury to others near him. His valiant leadership and courageous fighting spirit inspired all the men of the company who observed his last brave act. Second Lieutenant Sleigh's heroism reflected great credit upon himself and the Marine Corps and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country.
Authority: Navy Department Board of Decorations and Medals
Home Town: Marblehead, Massachusetts

SLIBY, DENNIS M.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Navy Cross to Dennis M. Sliby (2209054), Lance Corporal, U.S. Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism while serving as a Fire Team Leader with Company A, First Battalion, Fifth Marines, FIRST Marine Division (Reinforced), Fleet Marine Force, in connection with operations against the enemy in the Republic of Vietnam. On 30 March 1968, during Operation HOUSTON, Corporal Sliby's company deployed into defensive positions around several vital bridges in the Phu Bai area. Early the following morning, the company command post, located at the Troui River Bridge in Phu Loc District, came under a heavy mortar and rocket attack followed by a ground assault by two North Vietnamese army companies. Without hesitation, Corporal Sliby rallied his fire team and directed a heavy volume of accurate fire against the enemy. In the ensuing attack, he aggressively maneuvered his men from one position to another in an effort to seize a bunker which had been overrun by the enemy. As he was moving his team into a position to deliver fire into the emplacement, the enemy threw a grenade which landed among his men. With complete disregard for his own life, Corporal Sliby covered the grenade with his body, shielding his companions from the blast. Even though critically wounded, he shouted words of encouragement to his men and directed them into a secure position before crawling, unassisted, to the platoon command post for aid. His timely and selfless actions inspired all who observed him and undoubtedly saved the lives of his men. By his extraordinary courage, bold initiative, and unwavering devotion to duty at great personal risk, Corporal Sliby upheld the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and the United States Naval Service.
Authority: Navy Department Board of Decorations and Medals
Home Town: Boston, Massachusetts

SMITH, RAY L.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Navy Cross to Ray L. Smith (102290), Captain, U.S. Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism during the period 30 March to 1 April 1972 while serving as advisor to a Vietnamese Command group numbering approximately 250 Vietnamese Marines located on a small hilltop outpost in the Republic of Vietnam. With the Command Group repulsing several savage enemy assaults, and subjected to a continuing hail of fire from an attacking force estimated to be of two-battalion strength, Captain Smith repeatedly exposed himself to the heavy fire while directing friendly air support. When adverse weather conditions precluded further close air support, he attempted to lead the group, now reduced to only 28 Vietnamese Marines, to the safety of friendly lines. An enemy soldier opened fire upon the Marines at the precise moment that they had balked when encountering an outer defensive ring of barbed wire. Captain Smith returned accurate fire, disposing of the attacker, and then threw himself backwards on top of the booby-trap-infested wire barrier. Swiftly, the remaining Marines moved over the crushed wire, stepping on Captain Smith's prostrate body, until all had passed safely through the barrier. Although suffering severe cuts and bruises, Captain Smith succeeded in leading the Marines to the safety of friendly lines. His great personal valor and unrelenting devotion to duty reflected the highest credit upon himself, the Marine Corps and the United States Naval Service.
Authority: Navy Department Board of Decorations and Medals
Home Town: Shidler, Oklahoma

*SNYDER, STEPHEN FRANCIS
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Navy Cross (Posthumously) to Stephen Francis Snyder (0-93446), Second Lieutenant, U.S. Marine Corps (Reserve), for extraordinary heroism as Platoon Commander, Third Platoon, Company F, Second Battalion, Fourth Marines, THIRD Marine Division (Reinforced), Fleet Marine Force, in the Thon Son Lam area, Quang Tri Province, Republic of Vietnam, on 23 and 24 August 1966. Volunteering to attempt to relieve a trapped platoon, Second Lieutenant Snyder unhesitatingly led his platoon in a daring night march through unfamiliar, dense, enemy-infested jungle terrain. Upon arrival at the besieged platoon's position, he fearlessly took a small group into the trap to assist in evacuating wounded from the enemy-dominated location. Though met with a deadly hail of enemy grenades and small-arms fire, he managed to direct the evacuation of two wounded under the cover of darkness. For the next two hours, with complete disregard for his own safety, he selflessly exposed himself to intense fire while he directed suppressive fires which delayed the enemy assault. When the North Vietnamese finally attacked at dawn, Second Lieutenant Snyder heroically led his platoon in a determined counterattack in an effort to protect the trapped men. Undeterred by the murderous enemy grenade barrages and automatic weapons and sniper fire, he courageously led his men forward until he was mortally wounded. Second Lieutenant Snyder's stirring example, exceptional leadership, and marked courage were the determining factor in breaking the enemy assault and saved the lives of the trapped Marines. His great personal valor reflected great credit upon himself and was in keeping with the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and the United States Naval Service.
Authority: Navy Department Board of Decorations and Medals
Home Town: Sunbury, Pennsylvania

*SOLIZ, THOMAS
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Navy Cross (Posthumously) to Thomas Soliz (2180067), Corporal, U.S. Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism while serving as a Radio Operator with Company A, First Amphibian Tractor Battalion, THIRD Marine Division (Reinforced), Fleet Marine Force, in Quang Tri Province in the Republic of Vietnam on 6 September 1967. While on patrol, the Third Platoon of Company A was suddenly attacked by a numerically superior North Vietnamese Army force. Observing his Platoon Commander wounded and the platoon sustaining heavy casualties from a withering enemy fire of automatic, small-arms and antitank weapons, Corporal Soliz, with complete disregard for his own safety, ran about twenty-five meters through extremely heavy fire to climb aboard an amphibian tractor to man a machine gun. Knowing the safety of the platoon and outcome of the battle depended on his platoon gaining fire superiority, he unhesitatingly proceeded to place a heavy volume of well-aimed fire on the enemy which enabled the platoon to gain fire superiority, deploy to better defensive positions and evacuate several seriously wounded Marines to amphibian tractors where they could be treated. As he was delivering his devastating fire into the enemy, he was severely wounded by enemy fire which rendered him unconscious. Before assistance could arrive, Corporal Soliz was hit again and mortally wounded. Corporal Soliz's concern for the other members of his platoon coupled with his keen professional skill and unfaltering dedication to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country.
Authority: Navy Department Board of Decorations and Medals
Home Town: Bakersfield, California

*SPARK, MICHAEL MELVIN
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Navy Cross (Posthumously) to Michael Melvin Spark (0-49041), Colonel, U.S. Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism while serving as Commanding Officer, Third Marines, THIRD Marine Division (Reinforced), Fleet Marine Force, in connection with operations against enemy forces in the Republic of Vietnam on 15 January 1969. During a multi-battalion search and clear operation in the vicinity of An Hoa, Colonel Spark exhibited outstanding courage and presence of mind in the midst of violent combat action. While commanding a bold, highly imaginative, mobile operation in the mountainous terrain, Colonel Spark directed an assault against heavily fortified enemy positions. After ensuring that his men were properly positioned, Colonel Spark went airborne, by the use of a helicopter, to observe and direct the operation. During the process of the operation, it was necessary for the helicopter to descend, and as the helicopter hovered over the landing zone, which had been hastily cut out of the jungle, the enemy took the aircraft under automatic-weapons fire. Despite the enemy fire, he defiantly continued the personal direction of his men until finally the helicopter was hit and caused to crash. As the helicopter impacted, the enemy continued firing upon it, killing all the occupants. Throughout the entire operation, Colonel Spark placed requirements for full and direct support of his combat elements above any concern for his own personal safety. He spent the majority of his time with his forward-most units in order to effectively control the action. This enabled him to maximize exploitation of many situations, and served as an inspiration to the officers and enlisted Marines of his command. By his intrepid fighting spirit, daring initiative, and unswerving dedication to duty, Colonel Spark upheld the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country.
Authority: Navy Department Board of Decorations and Medals
Home Town: New York, New York

*SPICER, JONATHAN NATHANIEL
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Navy Cross (Posthumously) to Jonathan Nathaniel Spicer (2390916), Private First Class, U.S. Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism while serving with Company C, Third Medical Battalion, THIRD Marine Division (Reinforced), Fleet Marine Force, in the Republic of Vietnam on 8 March 1968. During an intense enemy rocket, mortar and artillery attack against the Khe Sanh Combat Base, Private Spicer unhesitatingly volunteered to serve as a stretcher bearer and assisted in embarking the numerous casualties aboard transport helicopters for evacuation. Completely disregarding his own safety, he continued to expedite the loading of the wounded aboard the aircraft, despite the increasing intensity of the attack, and was the last man to seek shelter in a bunker at the edge of the air strip. Observing a mortar round exploding near an evacuation helicopter loaded with casualties, he unhesitatingly left his position of relative safety to assist the wounded who were unable to move from their exposed position. Moments later, another round exploded within a few feet of Private Spicer, seriously wounding him, as he shielded a Marine from the blast with his own body. Unable to walk, he warned his comrades to remain in their protective positions while he attempted to crawl from the hazardous area to safety by himself. His selfless actions undoubtedly prevented serious injury or possible death to his fellow Marines and were an inspiration to all who observed him. By his dauntless courage, unfaltering determination and selfless devotion to duty at great risk, Private Spicer upheld the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and the United States Naval Service.
Authority: Navy Department Board of Decorations and Medals
Home Town: Miami, Florida

*SRSEN, STEVE ALBERT
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Navy Cross (Posthumously) to Steve Albert Srsen (2196925), Private First Class, U.S. Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism as a Rifleman while serving with Company A, First Battalion, Third Marines, THIRD Marine Division (Reinforced), Fleet Marine Force, in the Republic of Vietnam on 27 January 1967. Private First Class Srsen was with the First Platoon, Company A, when it was engaged in action as a reaction force assigned to link up with a reconnaissance patrol. Early the next morning following the linkup, Private First Class Srsen's squad came under heavy small-arms fire and grenade attack. When an enemy grenade landed in his squad's position, Private First Class Srsen warned three other members of the squad, allowing them to take cover and escape injury. Wounded in his right side and leg from the grenade, Private First Class Srsen, after being treated by a Corpsman requested permission to return to his position in the perimeter. Approximately thirty minutes later another enemy grenade landed close to another Marine and Private First Class Srsen gallantly pushed him to the ground, thereby saving his life. Mortally wounded by the exploding grenade, Private First Class Srsen, by his dauntless courage and grave concern for another had risked his life to save that of a fellow Marine, thereby upholding the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country.
Authority: Navy Department Board of Decorations and Medals
Home Town: San Lorenzo, California

*ST. CLAIR, CLARENCE H., JR.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Navy Cross (Posthumously) to Clarence H. St. Clair, Jr. (261867954), Corporal, U.S. Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism while serving as a Squad Leader with Company K, Third Battalion, Seventh Marines, FIRST Marine Division (Reinforced), Fleet Marine Force, in connection with combat operations against the enemy in the Republic of Vietnam. On 28 August 1969, while Company K was conducting a search and destroy operation in Quang Nam Province, the lead platoon was pinned down by small arms, automatic weapons, and antiaircraft fire from enemy soldiers concealed in well-camouflaged emplacements. Directed to assist the pinned-down element, Corporal St. Clair deployed his men to the point of heaviest contact and instantly came under intense fire. Observing two principal sources of hostile fire, he directed two of his fire teams to provide covering fire while he maneuvered his third team toward the enemy emplacements. While crawling toward their objective, the men were seriously wounded by enemy grenades. Quick to act, Corporal St. Clair began crawling through the enemy cross fire toward the first objective and had advanced only five meters when he was severely injured by the detonation of another grenade. Recovering quickly, he pressed his advance until he was close enough to the enemy bunker to hurl a grenade through its aperture, destroying the position and its occupants. Although suffering intense pain, he valiantly continued in the direction of the second objective and, while thus engaged, was mortally wounded. By his courage, aggressive fighting spirit and unwavering devotion to duty in the face of grave personal danger, Corporal St. Clair contributed significantly to the accomplishment of his unit's mission and upheld the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and of the United States Naval Service.
Authority: Navy Department Board of Decorations and Medals
Home Town: Pensacola, Florida

STAHL, MYKLE E.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Navy Cross to Mykle E. Stahl (109534), Captain [then Sergeant], U.S. Marine Corps (Reserve), for extraordinary heroism as Platoon Sergeant with a 4.2 Mortar Platoon attached to Company K, Third Battalion, Twenty-Sixth Marines, THIRD Marine Division (Reinforced), Fleet Marine Force, Pacific, in connection with combat operations against the enemy in the Republic of Vietnam on 21 January 1968. While maintaining a combat outpost on Hill 861, the Company came under enemy mortar, rocket, and ground attack. After the defensive positions on the southwest side of the hill were penetrated by enemy sappers, Captain Stahl, although having received shrapnel wounds, led eight Marines from the 4.2 Mortar Section and advanced up the trenchline to make contact with the Third Platoon. Realizing that by now the enemy forces were manning the bunkers in the trenchline, he launched a one man assault while other Marines provided a base of fire, thus enabling several wounded Marines to be evacuated. As he advanced further up the trenchline, Captain Stahl encountered three enemy soldiers who tried to capture him. Although receiving bayonet wounds and having his M-16 rifle malfunction during the struggle, he killed two of the enemy soldiers while another Marine fatally wounded the third. Captain Stahl then picked up an AK A-47 assault rifle and continued up the trenchline and assaulted the third bunker, killing three and capturing three enemy soldiers. Linking up with the Third Platoon, the trenchline was consolidated and evacuation of wounded Marines was completed. Captain Stahl then moved to a .50 caliber machine gun and, although wounded for the third time, continued directing suppressive fire into the attacking enemy forces. By his bold courage and steadfast dedication, Captain Stahl reflected great credit upon himself, the Marine Corps, and the United States Naval Service.
Authority: Navy Department Board of Decorations and Medals
Home Town: Abilene, Texas

STARRETT, EDWARD F.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Navy Cross to Edward F. Starrett (2573512), Lance Corporal, U.S. Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism while serving as a Mortar Gunner with Company G, Second Battalion, Fifth Marines, FIRST Marine Division (Reinforced), Fleet Marine Force, in connection with combat operations against the enemy in the Republic of Vietnam. During the early morning hours of 9 December 1970, while occupying a position in defense of a hamlet in Que Son District of Quang Nam Province, a unit of Marines and Regional Forces soldiers came under ground attack by a large North Vietnamese Army force supported by intense mortar and rocket-propelled grenade fire. During the initial moments of the assault, Lance Corporal Starrett was wounded when an enemy mortar damaged the bunker in which he was located. Although momentarily stunned, he recovered quickly and ran across the fire-swept terrain to his mortar position. As he commenced firing illumination rounds, a grenade landed in the pit he occupied, but he escaped further injury by quickly diving out of the emplacement. Returning to his gun, he found it inoperable and also observed that some of the hostile soldiers had penetrated the defensive perimeter. Observing one of the enemy preparing to hurl a hand grenade at the communications center, he prevented this action with an accurate burst of fire. Lance Corporal Starrett then commenced firing at the advancing enemy soldiers and immediately became a target for enemy grenades. Although wounded again, he continued his vigorous defense of the position, accounting for two more hostile soldiers and preventing further penetration at that point. Later, he stood in full view of the enemy, and seemingly oblivious to the grenades detonating around him, fired round after round into the attacking unit. Sustaining numerous casualties, the enemy was forced to retreat. By his courage, aggressive fighting spirit, and unfaltering devotion to duty in the face of grave personal danger, Lance Corporal Starrett was greatly instrumental in repelling a determined enemy force and upheld the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and of the United States Naval Service.
Authority: Navy Department Board of Decorations and Medals
Home Town: Baltimore, Maryland

*STEWART, MICHAEL EDWARD
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Navy Cross (Posthumously) to Michael Edward Stewart (2135524), Lance Corporal, U.S. Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism in action while serving as an Anti-tank Assaultman with the Second Platoon, Company A, First Battalion, Ninth Marines, THIRD Marine Division (Reinforced), Fleet Marine Force, on 13 May 1967 in Quang Tri Province, Republic of Vietnam. During a search and clear operation in the village of Phu An, Lance Corporal Stewart's company came under heavy small arms, machine gun and mortar fire from a well entrenched North Vietnamese Regular force, estimated at company strength. At the outset, several Marines were killed and others wounded in an area affording them little or no cover from the deadly accurate fire which felled them. Realizing that these Marines could not return unassisted to safety, Lance Corporal Stewart unhesitatingly, with full knowledge of the hazards involved and of the great risk of his own life, left his relatively safe position and crawled alone over fifty meters through open area to were the wounded lay helpless. One man was shot in the face and could not see. With uncommon calmness and bravery and while constantly exposing himself to the withering fire which continued to deplete his company's ranks, he calmed the man and guided him through the hail of bullets to safety. Again, ignoring the deadly accurate fire which had halted his company's advance, he returned to the field where others lay wounded. While dragging a second casualty to the rear, the man was again wounded. Lance Corporal Stewart steadfastly refused to leave the twice wounded Marine. As he daringly continued through the enemy fire toward safety, he was mortally wounded. Through his valiant spirit of self-sacrifice in the face of great personal risk, Lance Corporal Stewart saved one Marine from almost certain death and gave his own life helping another. His bold initiative, unswerving devotion to duty and courageous efforts inspired all who observed him and were in keeping with the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country.
Authority: Navy Department Board of Decorations and Medals
Home Town: Culpepper, Virginia

STOCKMAN, ROBERT D.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Navy Cross to Robert D. Stockman, Sergeant, U.S. Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism while serving as a Scout Dog Handler with the Third Military Police Battalion, Force Logistic Command, in connection with combat operations against the enemy in the Republic of Vietnam. On 14 January 1970, Sergeant Stockman accompanied a platoon on a mission to search a designated village for North Vietnamese Army soldiers and equipment. As the platoon neared its objective, the lead element was pinned down by a heavy volume of automatic weapons and rocket-propelled grenade fire from an enemy company occupying a well-fortified bunker complex. After rapidly assessing the situation, Sergeant Stockman tied his dog in a covered location, rushed across fifty meters of open area, and charged the nearest hostile emplacement, silencing the fire from that sector. Directing a companion to provide covering fire, Sergeant Stockman and another Marine maneuvered across the fire-swept terrain and attacked and destroyed the remaining bunker. At this time, the platoon came under intense fire from two other directions. Observing a wounded man fall in an open area, Sergeant Stockman unhesitatingly ran to his side, picked him up, and carried him to a covered location. When a medical transportation helicopter approached a pick-up site, the hostile fire immediately increased in intensity, delaying the landing. Seizing the initiative, Sergeant Stockman rallied the other members of the platoon and led an aggressive assault on the enemy force which forced it into a disorganized retreat, leaving behind two mortally wounded soldiers. By his courage, aggressive fighting spirit, and inspiring devotion to duty in the face of grave personal danger, Sergeant Stockman contributed significantly to the defeat of a numerically superior enemy force and upheld the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and of the United States Naval Service.
Authority: Navy Department Board of Decorations and Medals

STUCKEY, JAMES L.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Navy Cross to James L. Stuckey (2114059), Corporal [then Lance Corporal], U.S. Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism as a Fire Team Leader with Company C, First Battalion, Ninth Marines, THIRD Marine Division (Reinforced), Fleet Marine Force, in Quang Tri Province, Republic of Vietnam on 6 July 1967. While in a defensive position and surrounded by a large North Vietnamese Army force, Corporal Stuckey's fire team occupied a strategic point on the company's right flank. During one heavy attack, three enemy grenades landed in the fire team's position. Completely disregarding his own safety, Corporal Stuckey unhesitatingly picked up the grenades and hurled them back toward the enemy. As he was throwing the third grenade, it exploded severing his right hand. Despite the painful wound, he steadfastly refused to abandon his position, and courageously continued to fight and encourage his men. Although he evacuated one of his wounded men, Corporal Stuckey refused to seek aid for himself and staunchly repulsed the furious onslaught throughout the night, accepting treatment only when the enemy had withdrawn the following morning. His valiant leadership and courageous fighting spirit served to inspire the men in his platoon to heroic endeavor in repelling the enemy, and reflected the highest credit upon himself and the Marine Corps. By his heroic conduct and fearless devotion to duty, Corporal Stuckey upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.
Authority: Navy Department Board of Decorations and Medals
Home Town: Seminole, Florida

SULLIVAN, DANIEL F., JR.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Navy Cross to Daniel F. Sullivan, Jr. (2067034), Corporal, U.S. Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism while serving as a Machine Gun Team Leader with Company L, Third Battalion, Fourth Marines, THIRD Marine Division (Reinforced), Fleet Marine Force, in the Republic of Vietnam. On the night of 11 April 1966, Corporal Sullivan and his team were assigned to set up an ambush outside the hamlet of Nam Pho Ha in Phu Loc District in conjunction with Operation GOLDEN FLEECE II. Several Viet Cong were allowed to proceed within five feet of the Marines' machine gun before they were brought under fire. As two of the enemy fell in front of the machine gun, a grenade was thrown into Corporal Sullivan's position. With complete disregard for his own life, he leaped on the grenade and covered it with his body. Rolling onto his back and still clutching the sputtering grenade to his body, he hurled it upward and away from the Marines. Before it touched the ground, the grenade exploded harmlessly about six feet in front of the position. His valiant effort doubtlessly saved his three comrades from death or severe injury. By his gallant concern for his fellow Marines in the face of almost certain death, Corporal Sullivan upheld the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and the United States Naval Service.
Authority: Navy Department Board of Decorations and Medals
Home Town: South Boston, Massachusetts

SULLIVAN, GEORGE R.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Navy Cross to George R. Sullivan (0-94356), First Lieutenant, U.S. Marine Corps (Reserve), for extraordinary heroism while serving as a Platoon Commander with Company L, Third Battalion, Fourth Marines, THIRD Marine Division (Reinforced), Fleet Marine Force, in the Republic of Vietnam on 17 March 1967 during Operation PRAIRIE II. While on a search and clear mission in the vicinity of Dong Ha in the Quang Tri Province, Second Lieutenant Sullivan's platoon was approaching a suspected Viet Cong controlled village when it came under intense small arms and automatic weapons fire from a well concealed enemy force of estimated battalion size. After skillfully employing his men in order to bring a heavy volume of fire on the enemy positions, Second Lieutenant Sullivan observed an enemy automatic weapon to his front and realizing the necessity of neutralizing the well-fortified position, he courageously moved across open fire-swept terrain to within ten meters of the Viet Cong emplacement and silenced the enemy weapon with a grenade. After he had directed a machine gun team into a forward position to deliver suppressive fire at the enemy, he observed that the team's weapon had malfunctioned. Unhesitatingly he moved through concentrated enemy fire to the team's location and cleared the weapon. Meanwhile, another machine gun team had begun moving their weapon forward, but both Marines were wounded and fell in an area exposed to enemy fire. Courageously, Second Lieutenant Sullivan again disregarded the heavy enemy fire and unmindful of his own personal safety, moved to their position and carried them to a defiladed area, undoubtedly saving their lives. Later, while moving among his men, encouraging them and directing their fire, he was painfully wounded in his shoulder, arm and both legs. Although unable to move, he continued to direct the actions of his platoon while requesting air support, medical evacuation for the wounded and a re-supply of ammunition, and only after reinforcements had arrived, under the cover of darkness, did he allow himself to be evacuated. By his intrepid fighting spirit, selfless courage, bold initiative and unswerving devotion to duty at great personal risk, Second Lieutenant Sullivan reflected great credit upon himself, and upheld the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and the United States Naval Service.
Authority: Navy Department Board of Decorations and Medals
Home Town: Lynnbrook, New York

T

THATCHER, CHARLES D.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Navy Cross to Charles D. Thatcher (2178769), Lance Corporal, U.S. Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism as a Tank Commander with Company A, Third Tank Battalion, THIRD Marine Division (Reinforced), Fleet Marine Force, in connection with operations against the enemy in the Republic of Vietnam on 8 May 1967. While operating in support of the First Battalion, Fourth Marines, Lance Corporal Thatcher's tank was hit and heavily damaged by enemy fire during a savage mortar and infantry attack on the battalion's positions at Gio Linh by a 400-man North Vietnamese Army force. During the initial enemy antitank rocket assault, two of his crewmen were killed and one wounded. Although painfully wounded in the back and neck, he courageously reentered the burning tank to remove the dead and wounded and administered first aid to the surviving crewman. For one hour, while awaiting reinforcements, he cared for his wounded companion while fighting off repeated enemy assaults. When he was assured that his comrade had been moved to a secure area, he resolutely returned to his tank and boldly engaged the North Vietnamese alone with his .30-caliber machine gun, inflicting heavy casualties on the enemy. Having expended his machine gun ammunition, he left his disabled tank, retrieved a rifle from a dead infantryman, and continued to deliver a heavy volume of accurate fire on the enemy. Realizing that the infantrymen were dangerously low on small-arms ammunition, he completely disregarded his own safety to carry re-supplies to their fighting holes while under intense hostile fire. With three tanks disabled by the enemy fire, Lance Corporal Thatcher reacted instantly when he observed a North Vietnamese soldier about to fire a rocket at one of the operative tanks. Displaying bold initiative, he killed the enemy as he rushed the tank with his rocket launcher. Throughout the vicious fire fight, he repeatedly risked his own life to assist his wounded companions and provide continuous covering fire. His daring and heroic actions were instrumental in repulsing the North Vietnamese attack. Lance Corporal Thatcher's uncommon courage, inspiring leadership, and unwavering devotion to duty in the face of enemy fire reflected great credit upon himself and were in keeping with the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and of the United States Naval Service.
Authority: Navy Department Board of Decorations and Medals
Home Town: Chicago, Illinois

*THOMAS, MICHAEL HOWARD
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Navy Cross (Posthumously) to Michael Howard Thomas (0-102330), Second Lieutenant, U.S. Marine Corps (Reserve), for extraordinary heroism while serving as a Platoon Commander with Company I, Third Battalion, Twenty-Sixth Marines, THIRD Marine Division (Reinforced), Fleet Marine Force, in connection with operations against the enemy in the Republic of Vietnam on 20 January 1968. While leading his men in a coordinated attack with an adjacent platoon along a parallel ridge line in the vicinity of Hill 881 South, Lieutenant Thomas' platoon was taken under intense enemy automatic weapons fire from an estimated battalion-sized enemy force. The hostile fire wounded several Marines. As a medical evacuation helicopter endeavored to land to extract the wounded, it was taken under intense enemy machine-gun fire and crashed. Quickly assessing the situation, Lieutenant Thomas organized a rescue team and accompanied his men to the crash site to supervise rescue operations. Learning that the adjacent platoon was pinned down by enemy fire and that the platoon commander and others were wounded, he maneuvered his unit through the intense enemy fire across 500 meters of open terrain to reinforce the beleaguered platoon. Consolidating his force, he repeatedly exposed himself to enemy fire as he moved from one position to another encouraging and directing his men's fire. Discovering that eight men were missing, he organized and personally led a search party into the fire swept area, successfully locating five of the wounded and moved them to positions of relative safety. Although wounded as he was carrying a sixth Marine to safety, he refused medical assistance and elected to continue his rescue efforts. Despite his painful wound and near exhaustion, he again moved into the hazardous area in an attempt to rescue the two remaining casualties who were lying in a dangerously exposed area, when he was mortally wounded. By his bold initiative, gallant fighting spirit and loyal devotion to duty, Lieutenant Thomas was instrumental in saving several Marines from further injury or possible death, thereby reflecting great credit upon himself and the Marine Corps and upholding the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country.
Authority: Navy Department Board of Decorations and Medals
Home Town: Pawnee, Oklahoma

THOMPSON, BROCK I.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Navy Cross to Brock I. Thompson (2304778), Corporal, U.S. Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism while serving as Fire Team Leader, Second Squad, Third Platoon, Company E, Second Battalion, Seventh Marines, FIRST Marine Division (Reinforced), Fleet Marine Force, in the Republic of Vietnam on 19 October 1967. The Second Squad was acting as security for Bridge 11 on Highway 1, in Quang Nam Province, when it came under an extremely heavy barrage of grenades and withering small-arms and automatic weapons fire from a numerically superior Viet Cong force of estimated platoon size. Instantly maneuvering himself to a position from where he could observe the enemy entering the perimeter, Corporal Thompson opened fire, mortally wounding one of the enemy. Learning that his Squad Leader was seriously wounded, he immediately took command of the situation and moved to consolidate the surviving members of the squad and to direct fire upon the enemy. As the enemy advanced, a grenade landed between Corporal Thompson and a member of his fire team. With complete disregard for his own safety, Corporal Thompson unhesitatingly picked up the grenade, turned to place his body between the certain devastating blast and his fellow Marines, and attempted to throw the grenade. The grenade exploded critically wounding him. Despite his severe injury, he displayed magnificent determination and courage, and, refusing medical attention, he continued to direct and control the remaining members of the squad in organizing the successful defense of the position until additional friendly forces arrived. Only after all other wounded members of the squad had been treated, did he allow himself to be cared for and evacuated. Corporal Thompson's courageous actions and inspiring leadership upheld the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and the United States Naval Service.
Authority: Navy Department Board of Decorations and Medals
Home Town: Denver, Colorado

THOMPSON, CLINTON W.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Navy Cross to Clinton W. Thompson (2434938), Corporal, U.S. Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism on 13 and 14 March 1969 as a squad leader/platoon sergeant in Company M, Third Battalion, Fourth Marines, THIRD Marine Division (Reinforced), Fleet Marine Force, during operations against an armed enemy eleven miles north of Khe Sanh, Quang Tri Province, Republic of Vietnam. When his platoon was pinned down by extremely intense hostile fire during an assault on a well-entrenched enemy position consisting of reinforced bunkers, Corporal Thompson maneuvered through the barrage of hostile fire, located the exact positions of the enemy emplacements, and launched a single-handed assault on the enemy bunkers, using fragmentation grenades to destroy the positions and utilizing the rest of the squad in providing an effective base of fire. During a period of over one-half hour, he made repeated trips down an exposed slope to replenish his supply of grenades. During his daring assault, he destroyed three enemy bunkers, along with their occupants, following which the remainder of his platoon was able to maneuver around the enemy and secure the objective. On the following day, when the enemy counterattacked the company's position, concentrating on Corporal Thompson's platoon and forcing his men to withdraw, Corporal Thompson assumed the billet of platoon sergeant when that leader was wounded, rallied his men and led the assault to recapture the position, following the removal of the wounded to a safe area. It was during this period that an enemy bunker began to deliver fire on Corporal Thompson and his men. Once again, he personally assaulted the position with grenades, destroying the bunker and three occupants. He then organized his platoon and instilled in his men the courage and aggressiveness needed to seize the objective and subsequently hold it under a heavy enemy counterattack. Corporal Thompson's outstanding personal valor, leadership, and dedication were in keeping with the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and of the United States Naval Service.
Authority: Navy Department Board of Decorations and Medals
Home Town: St. Louis, Missouri

*THOMPSON, JERRALD RICH
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Navy Cross (Posthumously) to Jerrald Rich Thompson (1892012), Corporal, U.S. Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism as a Squad Leader serving with the First Platoon, Company C, First Reconnaissance Battalion, FIRST Marine Division (Reinforced), Fleet Marine Force, in the Republic of Vietnam on 16 June 1966. While occupying an observation post at 0100 on Hill 488, Quang Tin Province, deep in enemy controlled territory, the platoon of 18 men was subjected to an intense assault by a North Vietnamese unit estimated at battalion size. Corporal Thompson immediately ordered his squad to withdraw to a predetermined defensive perimeter. Braving a hail of small arms fire, automatic weapons, and mortar fire, the small bank of courageous Marines fought their way to the relative safety of the defensive position. In the course of this action, Corporal Thompson was painfully wounded by an enemy hand grenade and was unable to proceed. Armed with only a knife, he engaged the enemy in hand-to-hand combat and killed two before he fell, mortally wounded. By his indomitable fighting spirit in the face of seemingly insurmountable odds he was instrumental in the defense of his platoon's position. Corporal Thompson's courageous action under hostile fire reflected great credit upon himself and the Marine Corps and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life in the cause of freedom.
Authority: Navy Department Board of Decorations and Medals
Home Town: Columbus, Ohio

THOMPSON, JOHN C.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Navy Cross to John C. Thompson (1425383), Staff Sergeant, U.S. Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism with Marine Medium Helicopter Squadron THREE HUNDRED SIXTY- FOUR (HMM-364), Marine Aircraft Group SIXTEEN, First Marine Aircraft Wing, in support of the Republic of Vietnam against the insurgent communist guerrilla forces (Viet Cong) on 30 April 1964. During this action, Sergeant Thompson was assigned as loadmaster to service a flight of eighteen helicopters ordered to effect the evacuation of an outpost which was totally surrounded by the insurgent communist guerrillas. He arrived in the zone on the first aircraft and remained at his post until all the trapped personnel had been safely evacuated. As each aircraft approached for landing, he willingly stood up, exposing himself to heavy fire being placed on the landing zone and guided the aircraft to a safe landing by use of hand and arm signals. During intervals between landing helicopters, he armed himself with hand grenades and employed them in the defense of the landing zone. When the final aircraft arrived there were six persons, including Sergeant Thompson, left to be evacuated. As the pre-established number of five passengers was loaded, he gallantly offered to remain alone in the face of certain death in order to keep the load of the helicopter at a safe weight for take-off and to cover it with fire during its withdrawal. The pilot ordered him aboard and as the helicopter was taking off and he was pulled in, the passengers and crew fired over his body at the attacking enemy. His great personal valor and fearless devotion to duty reflected great credit upon himself and the Marine Corps and were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.
Authority: Navy Department Board of Decorations and Medals
Home Town: Corinth, Texas

THOMPSON, ROBERT H.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Navy Cross to Robert H. Thompson (0-62346), Lieutenant Colonel [then Major], U.S. Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism while serving as the Commanding Officer, First Battalion, Fifth Marines, FIRST Marine Division (Reinforced), Fleet Marine Force, in the Republic of Vietnam, from 12 February to 3 March 1968, while participating in Operation HUE CITY, Lieutenant Colonel Thompson aggressively led his battalion in intense fighting against well entrenched North Vietnamese forces within the Citadel. On 13 February, he deployed elements of his unit across the Perfume River to reduce enemy resistance in the southeast corner of the walled city. Almost immediately, small-arms, automatic weapons, and rocket fire from a large North Vietnamese force slowed his advance. Ignoring the intense enemy fire, he moved to an exposed vantage point where he rapidly assessed the situation and unhesitatingly moved across the fire-swept front of his battalion, directing the efforts of the company commanders and shouting words of encouragement to individual Marines, inspiring them to resume the momentum of the attack. Ordered to commence an attack northwest of the city on 28 February, Colonel Thompson fearlessly moved his command group with the attacking companies, repeatedly moving to the areas of heaviest contact in order to personally assist his unit commanders and influence the course of the engagement. When an attached company engaged a well entrenched North Vietnamese force on 1 March, Colonel Thompson accompanied a reinforcing unit dispatched to establish a blocking position to prevent the enemy's escape. Located with the lead elements, he personally coordinated supporting arms fire with the movement of the advancing Marines as they overwhelmed the enemy and accomplished the mission. By his intrepid fighting spirit, inspiring leadership, and selfless devotion to duty at great personal risk, Colonel Thompson upheld the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and the United States Naval Service.
Authority: Navy Department Board of Decorations and Medals
Home Town: Corinth, Mississippi

THORYK, BARRY L.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Navy Cross to Barry L. Thoryk (2316814), Corporal, U.S. Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism while serving as a Machine Gun Section Leader with Company A, First Battalion, Ninth Marines, THIRD Marine Division (Reinforced), Fleet Marine Force, in connection with operations against the enemy in the Republic of Vietnam. On 4 April 1968, Corporal Thoryk was participating in a company assault on Hill 471 near Khe Sanh, when his platoon came under an enemy grenade attack and intense automatic-weapons fire. Although he sustained multiple fragmentation wounds in the initial moments of the attack, Corporal Thoryk refused medical aid and single-handedly launched an aggressive assault against an enemy machine gun position, killing three of its defenders. Having expended his ammunition, he quickly obtained an enemy weapon and delivered fire at two enemy soldiers, killing them as they ran from their position. With complete disregard for his safety, Corporal Thoryk continued to maneuver forward, retrieving enemy hand grenades and throwing them at several hostile positions as he advanced. His courageous actions and steadfast determination were instrumental in seizing the enemy-occupied hill and inspired all who observed him. By his intrepid fighting spirit, bold initiative, and selfless devotion to duty, Corporal Thoryk upheld the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and the United States Naval Service.
Authority: Navy Department Board of Decorations and Medals
Home Town: Mantua, Ohio

*THOUVENELL, ARMAND RENE
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Navy Cross (Posthumously) to Armand Rene Thouvenell (2272239), Private First Class, U.S. Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism while serving as a Machine Gun Team Leader with Company M, Third Battalion, Fourth Marines, THIRD Marine Division (Reinforced), Fleet Marine Force, in the Republic of Vietnam on 29 May 1967. While engaged in Operation PRAIRIE IV, one fire team and one machine gun team were sent to reconnoiter two enemy bunkers. Almost immediately they became pinned down in a deadly machine gun crossfire from the two enemy positions. As casualties mounted, the machine gun ran low on ammunition, and the enemy was close enough to throw hand grenades into their position. Private First Class Thouvenell, a machine gun team leader from a different squad, unhesitatingly collected nine hundred rounds of ammunition and ran to the beleaguered unit. In order to accomplish this task, he had to run directly in front of the two bunkers, in the open and fully exposed to the enemy's devastating fire. When the team was ordered to pull back, he stayed behind to give covering fire, enabling the other members of the team to return to safety. As he exposed himself to the heavy enemy fire to effectively cover their withdrawal, he was mortally wounded. By his daring initiative, valiant fighting spirit and selfless devotion to duty in the face of insurmountable odds, Private First Class Thouvenell was responsible in great measure for saving many of his comrades and thereby upheld the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country.
Authority: Navy Department Board of Decorations and Medals
Home Town: Wheatridge, Colorado

*TIMMONS, JAMES MICHAEL
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Navy Cross (Posthumously) to James Michael Timmons (2389485), Private First Class, U.S. Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism while serving as a Messenger with Company M, Third Battalion, Seventh Marines, FIRST Marine Division (Reinforced), Fleet Marine Force, in connection with operations against the enemy in the Republic of Vietnam. On 6 November 1968, Company M was conducting a reconnaissance in force near Hill 55 in Quang Nam Province when the Marines came under intense small arms, automatic weapons, and rocket-propelled grenade fire from a North Vietnamese Army regiment occupying fortified positions. Sighting several Marines lying wounded in an area exposed to a heavy volume of fire, Private Timmons boldly traversed the fire-swept terrain and assisted a wounded comrade to a position of relative safety. Ignoring the hostile rounds impacting near him, he fearlessly returned to the hazardous area on two more occasions and assisted injured companions to the designated landing zone. As the evacuation helicopter attempted to land, the aircraft was forced from the zone by intense hostile machine-gun fire. On the second attempt, the aircraft again drew a heavy volume of small arms and rocket-propelled grenade fire which impacted near the casualties. Reacting instantly, Private Timmons courageously placed his body across that of a wounded Marine, shielding him from the North Vietnamese fire. While engaged in this selfless task, Private Timmons was mortally wounded. His daring initiative and sincere concern for the welfare of his comrade saved the life of a fellow Marine and contributed significantly to the accomplishment of his unit's mission. By his courage, resolute determination, and unwavering devotion to duty, Private Timmons upheld the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country.
Authority: Navy Department Board of Decorations and Medals
Home Town: Groveport, Ohio

TONKYN, MICHAEL S.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Navy Cross to Michael S. Tonkyn (2255465), Lance Corporal, U.S. Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism while serving as a Squad Leader with Company C, First Battalion, Fifth Marines, FIRST Marine Division (Reinforced), Fleet Marine Force, in connection with combat operations against the enemy in the Republic of Vietnam. During the early morning hours of 11 June 1969, while Company C was providing battalion security northwest of An Hoa in Quang Nam Province, the Marines came under a heavy volume of mortar, rocket, and small-arms fire from an estimated three North Vietnamese Army companies. In the initial moments of the ensuing fierce engagement, ten well- armed hostile soldiers infiltrated the company perimeter and took cover in a trenchline approximately twenty meters behind Lance Corporal Tonkyn's platoon. Reacting instantly, Lance Corporal Tonkyn and a companion crawled across the unprotected area to throw grenades and deliver rifle fire upon the invaders. When his comrade was seriously wounded and fell into the hostile trenchline, Lance Corporal Tonkyn leaped into the emplacement and dragged the injured Marine to a safe location. Then, determined to dislodge or kill the North Vietnamese soldiers, he returned to the enemy emplacement to continue his efforts. On four occasions, Lance Corporal Tonkyn maneuvered across the fire-swept terrain to procure additional hand grenades, and boldly raced along the position firing his rifle and throwing grenades, personally accounting for six hostile soldiers killed. His exceptional display of valor instilled confidence and aggressiveness in other Marines, who subsequently came to his assistance and eliminated the remainder of the enemy unit, thereby preventing the destruction of friendly mortar positions. By his courage, aggressive fighting spirit, and unwavering devotion to duty in the face of grave personal danger, Lance Corporal Tonkyn contributed significantly to the accomplishment of his unit's mission and upheld the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and the United States Naval Service.
Authority: Navy Department Board of Decorations and Medals
Home Town: Mendham, New Jersey

*TRENT, WILLIAM DERRILL
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Navy Cross (Posthumously) to William Derrill Trent (2381048), Lance Corporal, U.S. Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism while serving as a Machine Gun Squad Leader with Company M, Third Battalion, Fifth Marines, FIRST Marine Division (Reinforced), Fleet Marine Force, in connection with operations against the enemy in the Republic of Vietnam. On 8 May 1968, when Company M encountered a large North Vietnamese Army force in Quang Nam Province, Corporal Trent's platoon, serving as the forward element, came under heavy enemy automatic weapons and small-arms fire. Reacting instantly, he skillfully maneuvered his machine gun teams toward the enemy positions, despite the continuing hostile fire. When both the gunner and assistant gunner of one of the teams became casualties, Corporal Trent, undaunted by the enemy fire erupting around him, manned the machine gun and continued to advance against the enemy. Disregarding his own safety, he delivered effective fire into a fortified position, silencing the automatic weapon. Shifting his fire to another target of opportunity, he quickly annihilated a second enemy position. He then observed two North Vietnamese soldiers moving to occupy the first gun position. Instantly, he seized his machine gun and a belt of ammunition and courageously advanced against the enemy occupied position, firing his weapon as he maneuvered forward. Moving to within a few feet of the pinned down enemy, he killed both hostile soldiers. Quickly emplacing his machine gun in the fortified position, he began firing into the enemy's flank. Although mortally wounded by an enemy hand grenade, he remained at his exposed position until elements of his platoon were able to maneuver forward. By his bold initiative, intrepid fighting spirit and selfless devotion to duty, Corporal Trent inspired all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country.
Authority: Navy Department Board of Decorations and Medals
Home Town: East Peoria, Illinois

*TYCZ, JAMES NEIL (MIA)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Navy Cross (Posthumously) to James Neil Tycz (2082767), Sergeant, U.S. Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism while serving with the First Platoon, Company A, Third Reconnaissance Battalion, THIRD Marine Division (Reinforced), Fleet Marine Force, near Khe Sanh in the Republic of Vietnam on 9 May 1967. Sergeant Tycz was the patrol leader of a seven-man reconnaissance patrol deep in enemy-controlled territory. Shortly after midnight a North Vietnamese Army unit, estimated to be about 30-50 men, was heard moving toward the patrol's position. Sergeant Tycz cautioned his men to remain silent so as not to be detected; however, several of the enemy troops walked into the patrol's position and started to unsling their weapons after sighting the patrol. One of the Marines quickly took two of the enemy under fire, killing them instantly. Alerted to their location, the enemy immediately began delivering a heavy volume of small-arms fire into the patrol's perimeter. One patrol member was killed instantly and another was wounded. Sergeant Tycz quickly deployed the remainder of his patrol and fearlessly moved among his men directing their fire and shouting words of encouragement despite the heavy volume of enemy fire being poured into his perimeter. Within a few minutes the assistant patrol leader was seriously wounded, as was the Corpsman attached to the patrol and the second radio operator. Sergeant Tycz moved to a radio and began calling in artillery fire on the enemy positions. When an armed enemy hand grenade landed near one of the seriously wounded Marines, Sergeant Tycz courageously and with complete disregard for his own personal safety moved forward, picked up the grenade and attempted to throw it back at the enemy. The grenade exploded after traveling only a short distance, and he fell, critically wounded. Throughout the encounter, Sergeant Tycz set an example of calmness and coolness under fire that was an inspiration to the remainder of his patrol. By his unselfish act of courage, he risked his life to save his comrades from injury and possible loss of life and thereby upheld the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and the United States Naval Service.
Authority: Navy Department Board of Decorations and Medals
Home Town: Milwaukee, Wisconsin

*TYRONE, WILLIE DONALD
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Navy Cross (Posthumously) to Willie Donald Tyrone (1221421), Staff Sergeant, U.S. Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism as Assistant Advisor to the Vietnamese 39th Ranger Battalion while serving with Advisory Team SEVEN of the U.S. Military Assistance Command, Vietnam, on the night of 30 - 31 May 1965. When the battalion was subjected to heavy small-arms, mortar and 57-mm. recoilless rifle fire, Staff Sergeant Tyrone, with complete disregard for his own safety, moved about to point out targets and improve the position. Although painfully wounded in the shoulder, he refused evacuation, and when the Battalion Commander and Battalion S-3 were also wounded, and the Battalion Advisor killed, creating a critical command situation, Staff Sergeant Tyrone, in spite of his wound, assumed the advisory responsibility alone. He maintained radio contact throughout the night and continually encouraged his comrades by his words and valiant example. When the Viet Cong launched a strong counterattack early in the morning, he was mortally wounded, but continued to inspire his comrades by firing his weapon, killing at least an additional ten of the enemy before he died. Staff Sergeant Tyrone's conspicuous gallantry, willing self-sacrifice and extraordinary bravery, reflected great credit upon himself and the Marine Corps and were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life in the cause of freedom.
Authority: Navy Department Board of Decorations and Medals
Home Town: Carbon, Texas

U

UNDERWOOD, DAVID F., III
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Navy Cross to David F. Underwood, III (0-88999), Captain, U.S. Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism while serving as a Pilot with Marine Medium Helicopter Squadron ONE HUNDRED SIXTY-THREE (HMM-163), Marine Aircraft Group SIXTEEN, First Marine Aircraft Wing, in connection with operations against the enemy in the Republic of Vietnam. On the afternoon of 16 February 1968, Captain Underwood launched as Section Leader of a flight of two UH-34 helicopters in support of the emergency extraction of an eight-man reconnaissance team which was heavily engaged with a numerically superior North Vietnamese Army force six miles northwest of Dong Ha. When the initial extraction attempt by another helicopter was prevented due to intense enemy ground fire, Captain Underwood immediately commenced a low-altitude approach to the besieged unit, which had sustained three serious casualties. Nearing the landing zone, his aircraft suddenly came under a heavy volume of enemy automatic-weapons fire from all sides. With complete disregard for his own safety, he fearlessly continued his approach and landed in the hazardous area. Realizing that a second landing in the area would be extremely hazardous due to hostile fire and reduced visibility, he unhesitatingly elected to embark the entire team. Ignoring the intense enemy fire striking his aircraft, he courageously remained in the fire-swept area and calmly directed the fire of his gunners, enabling five of the Marines to embark. Forced to lift from the zone due to the increasing intensity of the hostile fire, which impacted in the helicopter's cockpit and resulted in extensive damage to vital aircraft components, he skillfully maneuvered his damaged aircraft back to Dong Ha. His superior aeronautical ability, resolute determination, and sincere concern for the welfare of his comrades saved the lives of several Marines and inspired all who served with him. By his courage, intrepid fighting spirit, and selfless devotion to duty in the face of extreme personal danger, Captain Underwood upheld the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and the United States Naval Service.
Authority: Navy Department Board of Decorations and Medals
Home Town: Waynesville, North Carolina

V

VANCOR, NORMAN W.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Navy Cross to Norman W. Vancor (2418325), Lance Corporal, U.S. Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism while serving as a Radio Operator with Company C, Third Reconnaissance Battalion, THIRD Marine Division (Reinforced), Fleet Marine Force, in connection with combat operations against the enemy in the Republic of Vietnam. On the morning of 7 May 1969, while Lance Corporal Vancor's five-man reconnaissance team was observing hostile movement in an area northwest of the Dong Ha Combat Base, the Marines came under a heavy volume of enemy small-arms fire and sustained two casualties. The team leader directed a withdrawal toward a pre-selected helicopter landing zone three hundred meters distant and as the men proceeded toward the designated location they again came under intense small-arms fire from North Vietnamese Army soldiers, mortally wounding two Marines and seriously injuring two others. Apparently believing that they had annihilated the friendly team, the enemy soldiers left their concealed positions and advanced toward the casualties. Lance Corporal Vancor, the only uninjured member of the reconnaissance patrol, boldly engaged the North Vietnamese, killing one and forcing the others to withdraw into the underbrush. He then administered first aid to his companions and contacted nearby aircraft to brief them on the current situation. Realizing that the critical conditions of the two men would not permit awaiting arrival of a reaction force, he made two hazardous trips along an unprotected ridgeline through two hundred meters of extremely hostile territory, successfully carrying his injured comrades to the landing site. Undaunted by intense enemy fire, he guided the aircraft into the position and directed the safe extraction of his patrol. His heroic actions and calm presence of mind during a critical situation inspired all who observed him and saved the lives of two Marines. By his courage, selfless concern for his fellowmen, and unwavering devotion to duty in the face of grave personal danger, Lance Corporal Vancor upheld the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and the United States Naval Service.
Authority: Navy Department Board of Decorations and Medals
Home Town: Ashfield, Massachusetts

*VASQUEZ, JESUS ROBERTO
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Navy Cross (Posthumously) to Jesus Roberto Vasquez (2126694), Sergeant, U.S. Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism while serving as an Explosive Ordnance Disposal Technician with the Ammunition Company, Supply Battalion, First Force Service Regiment/Force Logistic Command in connection with operations against the enemy in the Republic of Vietnam on 30 January 1968. During a mortar and rocket attack at the Khe Sanh Combat Base, several rounds landed in the ammunition supply point, igniting a stack of ammunition. Sergeant Vasquez, unhesitatingly rushed to the burning munitions and assisted in fighting the fire. Observing an 81-mm. mortar round burning and aware of the proximity of his comrades and the possibility of detonation, he lifted the round in an attempt to throw it into a deep crater where its lethal effects would be absorbed should it detonate. In his attempt to throw the round, it exploded, mortally wounding him. By his bold initiative, gallant fighting spirit and loyal devotion to duty, he was instrumental in saving his comrades from further injury or possible death by absorbing most of the impact with his own body. His great personal valor reflected great credit upon himself and enhanced the finest traditions of the Marine Corps and the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country.
Authority: Navy Department Board of Decorations and Medals
Home Town: El Paso, Texas

VERHEYN, DAVID A.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Navy Cross to David A. Verheyn (2117334), Lance Corporal, U.S. Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism while serving as a Team Leader with the Second Platoon, Company A, First Reconnaissance Battalion, FIRST Marine Division (Reinforced), Fleet Marine Force, in connection with operations in the Republic of Vietnam. On the night of 3 February 1967, while on an eleven-man reconnaissance patrol deep in enemy controlled territory, Lance Corporal Verheyn's unit was attacked by an estimated sixty Viet Cong. In the initial moments of the fire fight, the Patrol Leader and Assistant Patrol Leader were killed. Displaying outstanding initiative and presence of mind, he assumed command of the patrol, organized defensive positions and directed the fire of his men. Despite the intense fire, Lance Corporal Verheyn disregarded his personal safety to move from position to position, administering medical aid to his wounded companions. Subsequently, he was wounded by fragments from a Viet Cong grenade while he was directing fire at the enemy and shouting words of encouragement to his men. Ignoring his painful wounds, Lance Corporal Verheyn attempted to repair two radios which had been damaged by enemy fire in order to establish communications with higher headquarters. As the volume of fire momentarily decreased, he moved the wounded to a position of safety and prevented the Viet Cong from capturing their weapons. After distributing ammunition and improving the patrol's defensive positions, Lance Corporal Verheyn remained alert throughout the night for the possibility of another Viet Cong attack. At daylight, he used smoke grenades to signal relief helicopters and skillfully directed the aircraft into the landing zone. Assured that all of his patrol members were safely loaded aboard the helicopter, he searched the vacated positions, making sure that there were no weapons left behind. Lance Corporal Verheyn's inspiring leadership, steadfast courage, bold initiative, and unswerving devotion to duty under extremely hazardous conditions undoubtedly saved numerous Marine lives, reflected great credit upon himself, and upheld the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and of the United States Naval Service.
Authority: Navy Department Board of Decorations and Medals
Home Town: Lenoxdale, Massachusetts

W

 

WALLACE, ERNIE W.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Navy Cross to Ernie W. Wallace (2034491), Lance Corporal, U.S. Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism while serving as a machine gunner with Company H, Second Battalion, Fourth Marines, THIRD Marine Division (Reinforced), Fleet Marine Force, during Operation STARLITE against insurgent communist (Viet Cong) forces in the Republic of Vietnam on 18 August 1965. While the platoon to which he was attached was temporarily pinned down by intense mortar, automatic weapons, and small arms fire, Corporal Wallace and one rifle squad took cover in a trench. Realizing that the enemy was closing in on the squad in the trench line, he fearlessly moved into an exposed position and, firing his machine gun from the offhand and assault positions at close range, delivered such devastating fire into the stunned adversary that he personally accounted for twenty-five dead enemy, allowing the squad he was with to maneuver to a more advantageous area. Throughout the rest of the day he was seemingly inexhaustible in his efforts. Time and again he fearlessly exposed himself, as he dashed out into the open to provide cover by fire for the evacuation of wounded Marines in exposed areas. On one such occasion the bipod was shot from his weapon; however, he was not deterred as he continued to fire, accounting for the killing of fifteen more of the enemy. His outstanding performance of duty undoubtedly saved many Marine lives and materially aided the company in turning the tide of battle into a virtual annihilation of a numerically superior foe. Corporal Wallace's extraordinary heroism and inspiring dedication to duty reflected great credit upon himself and the Marine Corps and were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.
Authority: Navy Department Board of Decorations and Medals
Home Town: Wayne, West Virginia

*WARD, JAMES CLINTON
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Navy Cross (Posthumously) to James Clinton Ward (2439597), Corporal, U.S. Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism while serving as a Weapons Squad Leader with Company D, First Battalion, Fifth Marines, FIRST Marine Division (Reinforced), Fleet Marine Force, in connection with combat operations against the enemy in the Republic of Vietnam. On 9 May 1969, Corporal Ward's platoon was returning from a combat patrol when the lead element came under a heavy volume of hostile fire from a numerically superior force occupying well-concealed emplacements. Reacting instantly, Corporal Ward skillfully deployed his squad into effective fighting positions and directed counterfire on the enemy unit. Alertly observing that one of his fire teams had been pinned down in a dangerously exposed position and had sustained two serious casualties, he unhesitatingly mustered four companions and was boldly leading them across the fire- swept terrain when a grenade launcher round carried in the belt of a Marine maneuvering close beside him was detonated by enemy fire. Although partially blinded by the concussion of the grenade, Corporal Ward, concerned only for the safety of his injured comrades, resolutely continued his determined efforts to reach the fire team. With his light antitank assault weapon he quickly destroyed an enemy emplacement, which was the principal source of hostile fire, and reaching the side of one of his wounded men, he quickly administered first aid. After speaking words of encouragement to his comrade to restore his confidence, he moved through the hazardous area to the side of the second injured Marine. Unable to drag the casualty to a place of relative safety and undaunted by the closeness of enemy gun emplacements, Corporal Ward was boldly attempting to lift the wounded Marine onto his shoulders when he was mortally injured by enemy fire. By his courage, selfless concern for his comrades, and unwavering devotion to duty, Corporal Ward upheld the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country.
Authority: Navy Department Board of Decorations and Medals
Home Town: Alexandria, Virginia

WARREN, ROGER O.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Navy Cross to Roger O. Warren (2274526), Lance Corporal, U.S. Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism while serving as a Machine Gunner with Company F, Second Battalion, Fifth Marines, FIRST Marine Division (Reinforced), Fleet Marine Force, in action against the enemy in the Republic of Vietnam. On 3 February 1968, during Operation HUE CITY, Corporal Warren's platoon was taken under intense enemy automatic weapons and rocket fire as they attempted to assault the city's Treasury Building. As the unit entered a large courtyard, one Marine was seriously wounded by a sudden burst of hostile fire and was unable to move from his exposed position. Corporal Warren, who had been wounded earlier, ignored his own painful injuries and courageously ran into the open courtyard under intense enemy fire and placed his body between the casualty and the hostile fire. Disregarding his own personal safety, he commenced firing his machine gun from the hip at suspected enemy positions until he depleted his supply of ammunition. Quickly reloading his weapon, he once again placed fire on the enemy allowing the casualty to be evacuated. On 5 February, as he was delivering a heavy volume of suppressive fire on the enemy from the second story window of a building, he was suddenly hurled through the wall into the adjoining room by two enemy rocket rounds. Wounded in both legs and temporarily stunned by the force of the explosion, he was carried downstairs and placed with six other casualties awaiting treatment. Realizing the heavy enemy fire was preventing expeditious evacuation of the casualties, he exposed himself to the intense enemy fire and brought accurate M-16 fire to bear on the enemy. Assured that the more severe casualties had been evacuated, he allowed himself to be evacuated and helped carry a wounded comrade to the aid station. Despite his several wounds, he refused medical evacuation and elected to return to his unit due to the shortage of qualified machine gunners. Upon returning to his unit Corporal Warren directed intense fire on the enemy positions. He gallantly continued to perform his duties until the seriousness of his wounds caused him to be evacuated on 10 February 1968. By his intrepid fighting spirit, exceptional fortitude, bold initiative and devotion to his fellow Marines, Corporal Warren reflected great credit upon himself and the Marine Corps and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.
Authority: Navy Department Board of Decorations and Medals
Home Town: Klamath Falls, Oregon

*WEBB, BRUCE DOUGLAS
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Navy Cross (Posthumously) to Bruce Douglas Webb (0-68857), Captain, U.S. Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism as Commanding Officer of Company I, Third Battalion, Third Marines, THIRD Marine Division (Reinforced), Fleet Marine Force, in the Republic of Vietnam on 18 August 1965. Captain Webb's company was engaged in search and destroy operations against the communist insurgent forces in Quang Ngai Province when two of his platoons came under heavy small arms, automatic weapons and mortar fire from a Viet Cong force of battalion size. Without hesitation he moved immediately to the point of crisis in order to maintain his company's momentum in attacking the enemy and to supervise the maneuver of his command. With full knowledge of the hazards involved and with complete disregard for his own safety, he repeatedly exposed himself to enemy fire while directing the operation of his forces. Observing that the aggressive actions of the enemy threatened an adjacent unit, he requested permission to move his company into the adjoining zone of action and to attack the Viet Cong forces in the flank. In the face of heavy enemy fire he led his company across an open field to assault the enemy. As the attack progressed, the enemy fire increased in volume and accuracy, but he continued to set an example of calmness and courage. Moving from position to position, he inspired his men with his dynamic leadership and courageous fighting spirit until he fell, mortally wounded by an enemy hand grenade. As a result of his professional ability and stirring example the enemy positions were destroyed and over forty enemy killed. Captain Webb's inspiring professional ability and courageous devotion to duty reflected great credit upon himself and the Marine Corps and were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life in the cause of freedom.
Authority: Navy Department Board of Decorations and Medals
Home Town: Wheaton, Illinois

WEBB, JAMES H., JR.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Navy Cross to James H. Webb, Jr. (106180), First Lieutenant, U.S. Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism while serving as a Platoon Commander with Company D, First Battalion, Fifth Marines, FIRST Marine Division (Reinforced), Fleet Marine Force, in connection with combat operations against the enemy in the Republic of Vietnam. On 10 July 1969, while participating in a company-sized search and destroy operation deep in hostile territory, First Lieutenant Webb's platoon discovered a well-camouflaged bunker complex which appeared to be unoccupied. Deploying his men into defensive positions, First Lieutenant Webb was advancing to the first bunker when three enemy soldiers armed with hand grenades jumped out. Reacting instantly, he grabbed the closest man and, brandishing his .45 caliber pistol at the others, apprehended all three of the soldiers. Accompanied by one of his men, he then approached the second bunker and called for the enemy to surrender. When the hostile soldiers failed to answer him and threw a grenade which detonated dangerously close to him, First Lieutenant Webb detonated a claymore mine in the bunker aperture, accounting for two enemy casualties and disclosing the entrance to a tunnel. Despite the smoke and debris from the explosion and the possibility of enemy soldiers hiding in the tunnel, he then conducted a thorough search which yielded several items of equipment and numerous documents containing valuable intelligence data. Continuing the assault, he approached a third bunker and was preparing to fire into it when the enemy threw another grenade. Observing the grenade land dangerously close to his companion, First Lieutenant Webb simultaneously fired his weapon at the enemy, pushed the Marine away from the grenade, and shielded him from the explosion with his own body. Although sustaining painful fragmentation wounds from the explosion, he managed to throw a grenade into the aperture and completely destroy the remaining bunker. By his courage, aggressive leadership, and selfless devotion to duty, First Lieutenant Webb upheld the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and of the United States Naval Service.
Authority: Navy Department Board of Decorations and Medals
Born: February 9, 1946 at St. Joseph, Missouri
Home Town: St. Joseph, Missouri

WEISE, WILLIAM
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Navy Cross to William Weise (0-57704), Lieutenant Colonel, U.S. Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism while serving as Commanding Officer, Second Battalion, Fourth Marines, Ninth Marine Amphibious Brigade, in the Republic of Vietnam from 30 April to 2 May 1968. Colonel Weise exhibited exceptional valor and courage while leading his battalion against an estimated 2,000 North Vietnamese Army regulars entrenched in a well fortified bunker complex and supported by artillery fire. Initially having only a small portion of the battalion's combat elements available to engage the enemy, he skillfully utilized and coordinated effective air strikes and artillery fire upon the hostile force, maintaining constant pressure on the enemy and thus denying him freedom of maneuverability. As additional elements arrived, Colonel Weise integrated his forces and initiated assaults which eliminated successive enemy strong points. His masterful tactical employment of forces, combined with his personal direction of the ground forces, provided the inspiration required to mount repeated attacks in the face of seemingly overwhelming odds, despite the unit's depletion due to previous heavy combat commitments. When the enemy launched several counterattacks against his units, he continually moved among his men, rallying them and inspiring confidence in his unit leaders and among individual Marines while reorganizing and maintaining maximum combat effectiveness within each element. On the third day of battle, while personally leading in a fierce assault on the enemy's furthermost portion of the heavily defended objective, Colonel Weise was seriously wounded, but actively directed the orderly withdrawal of his forces to supporting positions. Steadfastly maintaining control of his battalion, he tenaciously continued to direct the evacuation of casualties to the secondary positions until he collapsed from his critical wound. During this period, the battalion accounted for hundreds of North Vietnamese casualties and four enemy prisoners. By his dynamic leadership, unfaltering courage and selfless devotion to duty throughout, Colonel Weise inspired all who served with him and upheld the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and the United States Naval Service.
Authority: Navy Department Board of Decorations and Medals
Born: March 10, 1929 at Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
Home Town: Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

WIDGER, ROBERT I.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Navy Cross to Robert I. Widger (2380489), Corporal, U.S. Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism on 7 June 1969 as a Machine Gun Squad Leader in Company K, Third Battalion, First Marines, FIRST Marine Division (Reinforced), Fleet Marine Force, in connection with combat operations against an armed enemy in the Republic of Vietnam. When his platoon commander and platoon sergeant were seriously wounded, along with several other Marines, during a ground attack by a numerically superior hostile force which penetrated the defensive perimeter, Corporal Widger immediately assumed command of the platoon and repeatedly exposed himself to the enemy fire while directing the fire of his men and coordinating the defensive actions. On one occasion, he manned a machine gun and accounted for several enemy casualties. On still another occasion, when his weapon malfunctioned, he succeeded in eliminating an attacking enemy soldier in hand-to-hand combat. With several wounded Marines lying in dangerously exposed positions, Corporal Widger moved across the fire-swept terrain to his fallen comrades, administered first aid, and moved them to covered positions. Under his decisive leadership, the enemy attack was repelled and the hostile troops were driven from within the perimeter. He then provided cover while the medical evacuation helicopters extracted the wounded. By his heroic and inspiring actions, Corporal Widger contributed greatly to the success of his platoon in accounting for numerous enemy casualties and in capturing large quantities of weapons and ammunition. His outstanding courage, initiative, and devotion to duty in the face of great personal danger were in keeping with the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and of the United States Naval Service.
Authority: Navy Department Board of Decorations and Medals
Home Town: Syracuse, New York

WILLIAMS, ROBERT S.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Navy Cross to Robert S. Williams (0-92019), First Lieutenant [then Second Lieutenant], U.S. Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism as Platoon Commander, First Platoon, Company I, Third Battalion, Fifth Marines, FIRST Marine Division (Reinforced), Fleet Marine Force, in the Cam Lo District, Republic of Vietnam on 24 and 25 July 1966. As Company I moved onto Hill 362, First Lieutenant Williams' platoon overran the forward security elements of an estimated battalion of the North Vietnamese Army. While in conflict with the security elements the Second Platoon bypassed the First Platoon and came under devastating preplanned fire by the enemy's main force, suffering many casualties. Realizing the graveness of the situation and being constantly exposed to intense enemy fire, First Lieutenant Williams led his platoon in the same frontal assault. Inspired by his courageous leadership and apparent calm in the face of overwhelming odds, the First Platoon gained the time and terrain to cover the rescue of the Second Platoon's wounded. When the numerically stronger force counterattacked, First Lieutenant Williams took command of the two platoons and formed them into a right perimeter for a better defense. Fearing that wounded had been left behind, he went out of the perimeter alone to search for them. There were bursts of automatic weapons fire, and the covering force began receiving withering assault fire from the advancing enemy. Artillery fire was called in to within seventy-five yards of the forward positions to avoid being completely overrun. Returning to the perimeter, First Lieutenant Williams emerged from the tall grass and reported he could not find any more wounded. Throughout the remainder of that day and the next, First Lieutenant Williams, constantly exposed to enemy fire, moved from position to position encouraging his men and directing their fire. Then early in the evening of 24 July, being too engrossed in his duties to seek cover, he was painfully wounded in the leg by a mortar attack; but he refused treatment until his troops had been cared for and continued moving from position to position bolstering morale and the fighting efficiency of his unit. First Lieutenant Williams' extreme valor, undying devotion to duty, and initiative at the risk of his own life, saved the lives of many Marines and upheld the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and the United States Naval Service.
Authority: Navy Department Board of Decorations and Medals
Home Town: St. Genevieve, Maryland

WILSON, WILLIS C.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Navy Cross to Willis C. Wilson (0-87454), First Lieutenant, U.S. Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism as a Platoon Commander with Company B, First Battalion, Third Marines, THIRD Marine Division (Reinforced), Fleet Marine Force, in connection with operations against communist forces in the Republic of Vietnam on 2 April 1966. During Operation ORANGE, Lieutenant Wilson's platoon became heavily engaged with the enemy near the hamlet of Lap Thuan. Intense enemy mortar fire, close-range small-arms fire, and barbed wire obstacles covered by automatic weapons prevented the forward movement of the platoon. Although painfully wounded during the initial mortar barrage, Lieutenant Wilson courageously moved up and down his platoon's positions, directing his men and judiciously ordering the deployed squads to bypass the barbed wire in an attempt to eliminate the Viet Cong threat. When his platoon sergeant was wounded and became entangled in the barbed wire, Lieutenant Wilson, with complete disregard for his own safety, started across seventy-five meters of open terrain in an attempt to retrieve the mortally wounded man, who was still being hit by small- arms fire. Before he could reach the sergeant's position, Lieutenant Wilson was caught in the hail of small-arms fire and seriously wounded in the shoulder. Although thwarted in the rescue effort, he competently resumed direction of the platoon and established a strong base of fire to provide cover for a deployed squad. When a radio operator was wounded in a sudden flurry of Viet Cong fire, Lieutenant Wilson again braved the withering fire to assist the man. For the third time, he was hit, sustaining a serious wound in the chest from small-arms fire. With extraordinary determination and presence of mind, he continued to maintain direction of his platoon. Increasing the rate of fire from his base squads, he launched an attack by the enveloping squad which finally silenced the Viet Cong fire. By his exceptional valor despite his suffering from multiple wounds, daring initiative and unswerving dedication to duty throughout, Lieutenant Wilson upheld the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and the United States Naval Service.
Authority: Navy Department Board of Decorations and Medals
Home Town: Sharpsville, Pennsylvania

*WIRICK, WILLIAM CHARLES
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Navy Cross (Posthumously) to William Charles Wirick (2386310), Corporal, U.S. Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism while serving as a Mortar Section Leader with Company I, Third Battalion, Twenty-Sixth Marines, Ninth Marine Amphibious Brigade, in connection with combat operations against the enemy in the Republic of Vietnam. On the night of 8 December 1968, while Corporal Wirick's platoon was maneuvering across a large open rice paddy, the Marines were pinned down by a heavy volume of automatic weapons fire from a hostile force occupying well-fortified emplacements, and were then subjected to intense sniper fire from enemy soldiers located in elevated positions. Although seriously wounded during the initial moments of the fierce fire fight, Corporal Wirick ignored his painful injury and maneuvered boldly across the fire-swept terrain, supervising the evacuation of other casualties. Observing that another wounded and helpless companion had become a vulnerable target for sniper fire, Corporal Wirick unhesitatingly threw himself across his companion and, with his own body, absorbed the primary effects of several sniper rounds. His heroic action and selfless concern for his fellowman inspired all who observed him and saved the life of another Marine. By his courage, bold initiative and unwavering devotion to duty in the face of grave personal danger, Corporal Wirick upheld the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life in the service of his country.
Authority: Navy Department Board of Decorations and Medals
Home Town: Toledo, Ohio

WOODS, LLOYD
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Navy Cross to Lloyd Woods, Corporal, U.S. Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism while serving as a Radio Operator with Company F, Second Battalion, Fifth Marines, FIRST Marine Division (Reinforced), Fleet Marine Force, in Quang Tin Province, Republic of Vietnam, on 2 June 1967. During Operation UNION II, Corporal Woods' company came under intense enemy automatic weapons, small arms and mortar fire which temporarily pinned down the first platoon in an exposed rice paddy. In the initial burst of fire, the platoon sustained numerous casualties, including the platoon commander. Upon observing his wounded commander lying exposed to the intense enemy fire, he unhesitatingly ran through the heavy volume of fire to his side, placed him on his shoulder and carried him to a position of relative safety. Then, rallying four companions, he again moved across the open rice paddy to evacuate another wounded Marine who was lying in close proximity to an enemy machine gun position. Upon reaching the wounded man and realizing it was impossible to move him because of the enemy machine gun fire, he boldly maneuvered into the tree line towards the enemy position, and single-handedly assaulted the gun, killing the gunner and capturing his weapon. He then boldly leaped into the adjacent emplacement and, in fierce hand-to-hand combat, killed that gunner and commenced to fire the enemy machine gun against other hostile positions, providing cover while his companions evacuated the wounded man. As a result of Corporal Woods' courageous actions, his unit was able to regroup and succeeded in evacuating its casualties to positions of safety. By his intrepid fighting spirit, exceptional fortitude and gallant initiative, Corporal Woods inspired all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and the United States Naval Service.
Authority: Navy Department Board of Decorations and Medals
Home Town: Grand Rapids, Michigan

WYNN, EDWARD H.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Navy Cross to Edward H. Wynn (2424476), Private First Class, U.S. Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism while serving as a Platoon Radio Operator with Company E, Second Battalion, Fourth Marines, Ninth Marine Amphibious Brigade, in connection with operations against the enemy in the Republic of Vietnam. On the morning of 25 May 1968, Company E was assaulting two North Vietnamese Army companies occupying well-fortified positions near the village of Nhi Ha (2) in Quang Tri Province when the point platoon became pinned down by intense small arms, automatic weapons, and mortar fire. Realizing that the heavy volume of fire was preventing his platoon from reinforcing the lead elements, Private First Class Wynn fearlessly exposed himself to the furious hostile fire and commenced delivering suppressive fire upon the enemy emplacements. Observing a Corpsman attempting to assist a wounded Marine to a covered location, he unhesitatingly maneuvered across the fire-swept terrain to a more advantageous firing position and directed devastating covering fire which enabled the injured man to be moved to an area of relative safety. Although seriously wounded by intense grenade fire, Private First Class Wynn steadfastly refused medical treatment and continued his determined efforts against the enemy. Alertly observing three hostile soldiers approaching a tank from the rear, he courageously assaulted the enemy attackers, wounding two and capturing the third soldier. Ignoring the hostile rounds impacting near him, Private First Class Wynn rapidly returned to his platoon with the prisoner and, fearlessly traversing the dangerously exposed area on two additional occasions, recovered the two remaining injured North Vietnamese and delivered them to his unit. Although weak from his wounds, he resolutely resumed his fighting position and assisted his comrades until all of the other casualties were medically evacuated. By his intrepid fighting spirit, exceptional fortitude and gallant initiative, Private First Class Wynn served to inspire all who observed him and contributed in large measure to the success of his unit in assaulting the enemy. His great personal valor reflected the highest credit upon himself and enhanced the finest traditions of the Marine Corps and the United States Naval Service.
Authority: Navy Department Board of Decorations and Medals
Home Town: Napa, California

Y

*YARBER, VERNON LEE
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Navy Cross (Posthumously) to Vernon Lee Yarber (2366678), Lance Corporal, U.S. Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism while serving as a Squad Leader with Company L, Third Battalion, Third Marines, THIRD Marine Division (Reinforced), Fleet Marine Force, in connection with combat operations against the enemy in the Republic of Vietnam. On the night of 26 August 1968, Corporal Yarber was occupying a listening post in front of his company's defensive position near the Rockpile in Quang Tri Province when the Marines came under a heavy volume of enemy mortar fire. Realizing the seriousness of the situation, he rapidly maneuvered his men to a relatively safe position from which to more effectively observe the surrounding area. Following the mortar attack, Corporal Yarber alertly detected a reinforced North Vietnamese Army platoon moving toward the Marine perimeter and, immediately directing his radio operator to inform his Commanding Officer of the impending attack, boldly led his small force in delivering a heavy volume of fire upon the hostile soldiers. When ordered to return to the perimeter, he unhesitatingly ordered his men to depart the listening post and, disregarding his own safety, fearlessly remained behind as he provided effective covering fire for his comrades. As the last man departed, Corporal Yarber attempted to withdraw from his isolated position and was mortally wounded. His daring initiative and heroic efforts inspired all who observed him and were instrumental in preventing a surprise attack on his company. By his courage, sincere concern for the welfare of his comrades, and steadfast devotion to duty, Corporal Yarber contributed significantly to the accomplishment of his unit's mission and upheld the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country.
Authority: Navy Department Board of Decorations and Medals
Home Town: Jacksonville, Florida

*YATES, JOHN CHARLES
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Navy Cross (Posthumously) to John Charles Yates (0-108133), Second Lieutenant, U.S. Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism while serving as the Communications Chief of Company B, First Amphibian Tractor Battalion, THIRD Marine Division (Reinforced), Fleet Marine Force, in connection with operations against the enemy in the Republic of Vietnam. On the morning of 17 October 1968, Second Lieutenant Yates, then a Staff Sergeant, was participating in the transportation of Marines by amphibian tractor during operations north of the Cua Viet River in Quang Tri Province. When informed that one of the vehicles had detonated a hostile antitank mine, immobilizing the tractor and trapping the driver inside, he unhesitatingly ran to the disabled and flaming vehicle. Undaunted by the danger of potential explosions from fire he observed within the tractor, he completely disregarded his own safety as he fearlessly climbed on top of the vehicle. While he was preparing to enter the tractor through the crew chiefs hatch to rescue the driver, the fuel cells within the vehicle exploded and fatally injured Second Lieutenant Yates. By his courage, bold initiative and unwavering devotion to duty, Second Lieutenant Yates inspired all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life in the service of his country.
Authority: Navy Department Board of Decorations and Medals
Home Town: Fergus Falls, Minnesota

YORDY, CHARLES R.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Navy Cross to Charles R. Yordy (2420003), Private First Class, U.S. Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism while serving with Company K, Third Battalion, Twenty-Seventh Marines, FIRST Marine Division (Reinforced), Fleet Marine Force, in connection with operations against the enemy in the Republic of Vietnam. On 24 May 1968 during Operation ALLEN BROOK in Quang Nam Province, Private Yordy's platoon was assigned the mission of enveloping an enemy village in order to relieve the pressure on an adjacent platoon which was pinned down by the heavy volume of fire from well fortified hostile positions. As the Marines moved up on the flank of the enemy, the unit came under intense automatic weapons fire from several North Vietnamese bunkers and spider holes, pinning down the platoon and inflicting numerous casualties, including the platoon commander who fell directly in front of an enemy machine-gun emplacement. Unhesitatingly and with complete disregard for his personal safety, Private Yordy rushed across the hazardous area firing his M-16 rifle from the hip and succeeded in reaching the side of the injured officer. Picking up the wounded man's M- 79 grenade launcher and ignoring the enemy rounds striking around him, he fired directly into the aperture of the bunker silencing the hostile fire. Observing another enemy bunker nearby which had pinned down his companions, he crawled to the emplacement and destroyed it with several hand grenades. As the platoon began to withdraw, Private Yordy selflessly remained behind and covered the withdrawal of his unit by throwing hand grenades and firing his grenade launcher at the hostile position, abandoning his precarious position only when he was assured that his fellow Marines had reached relative safety. Throughout the battle, his heroic actions and presence of mind were an inspiration to all who observed him and were responsible for the successful extraction of his unit, undoubtedly saving the lives of many of his comrades. By his courage, aggressive fighting spirit, and selfless devotion to duty in the face of great personal danger, Private Yordy upheld the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and the United States Naval Service.
Authority: Navy Department Board of Decorations and Medals
Home Town: Fruitport, Michigan

YOUNG, WILLIAM H.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Navy Cross to William H. Young, Lance Corporal, U.S. Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism while serving as a Radio Operator with Company A, First Battalion, Third Marines, THIRD Marine Division (Reinforced), Fleet Marine Force, in connection with combat operations against the enemy in the Republic of Vietnam. On the afternoon of 7 March 1968, while advancing toward the village of Phu Tai in Quang Tri Province, Company A came under intense automatic weapons and mortar fire from a numerically superior North Vietnamese Army force concealed in fortified bunkers. Although the Marines were pinned down in an open rice paddy, where any movement away from the protection afforded by the small dikes might mean almost certain death or serious injury, Corporal Young ignored the rounds impacting near him and fearlessly moved to positions from which he could effectively control air strikes on the enemy emplacements. When friendly casualties increased, he again disregarded his own safety as he unhesitatingly maneuvered forward and directed the evacuation of the wounded to a helicopter landing zone which he had established. During a subsequent assault on the village, he repeatedly exposed himself to intense hostile fire in order to coordinate and control the fire of supporting helicopter gunships. As the Marines moved through the hazardous area, an enemy soldier suddenly ran out of a nearby bunker and prepared to fire directly at the advancing command group. Shouting a warning to his comrades, Corporal Young boldly assaulted the North Vietnamese, killing him with accurate pistol fire. Although he was later wounded in the chest and leg by sniper fire and moved to a covered position, he ignored his painful injuries and continued to coordinate vital air support for approximately three hours. His heroic and selfless actions inspired all who observed him. By his courage, intrepid fighting spirit, and unwavering devotion to duty in the face of great personal danger, Corporal Young contributed immeasurably to the defeat of the enemy and upheld the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and the United States Naval Service.
Authority: Navy Department Board of Decorations and Medals

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