Medal of Honor Recipients - 1926-Present

Nicaragua
Admiral Byrd's Expedition
Charles Lindbergh, Trans-Atlantic Flight
Peace Time
USS Liberty
Operation Restore Hope, Somalia

KIA-MIA-POWFull NameRankBranchHometownWar / ConflictPhotoBioCitationAuthorityPresentationAction DateCompanyBattalionRegimentDivisionBattle-IncidentRemarksDate of BirthWhere BornDate of DeathCemeteryWhere Buried
261929 Somalia (1993)1993KIA (Somalia)Shughart, Randall DavidSergeant First ClassUnited States ArmyNewville, Pennsylvania Operation Restore HopeRandall Shughart was raised in a U.S. Air Force family that settled on a dairy farm in Pennsylvania after his father retired from active duty service. Both he and fellow "Delta" Operator Gary Gordon, a close friend as well as team member, were Killed in Action during the Somalia mission that became known as the "Blackhawk Down" mission. Both Shughart and Gordon were awarded Posthumous Medals of Honor, the only Medal of Honor Awards in the interim between the Vietnam War and the Global War on Terrorism.The President of the United States of America, in the name of Congress, takes pride in presenting the Medal of Honor (Posthumously) to Sergeant First Class Randall David Shughart, United States Army, for gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of life above and beyond the call of duty, on 3 October 1993, while serving as a Sniper Team Member, United States Army Special Operations Command with Task Force Ranger in Mogadishu, Somalia, in support of Operation RESTORE HOPE. On that date, Sergeant First Class Shughart provided precision sniper fires from the lead helicopter during an assault on a building and at two helicopter crash sites, while subjected to intense automatic weapons and rocket propelled grenade fires. While providing critical suppressive fires at the second crash site, Sergeant First Class Shughart and his team leader learned that ground forces were not immediately available to secure the site. Sergeant First Class Shughart and his team leader unhesitatingly volunteered to be inserted to protect the four critically wounded personnel, despite being well aware of the growing number of enemy personnel closing in on the site. After their third request to be inserted, Sergeant First Class Shughart and his team leader received permission to perform this volunteer mission. When debris and enemy ground fires at the site caused them to abort the first attempt, Sergeant First Class Shughart and his team leader were inserted one hundred meters south of the crash site. Equipped with only his sniper rifle and a pistol, Sergeant First Class Shughart and his team leader, while under intense small arms fire from the enemy, fought their way through a dense maze of shanties and shacks to reach the critically injured crew members. Sergeant First Class Shughart pulled the pilot and the other crew members from the aircraft, establishing a perimeter which placed him and his fellow sniper in the most vulnerable position. Sergeant First Class Shughart used his long range rifle and side arm to kill an undetermined number of attackers while traveling the perimeter, protecting the downed crew. Sergeant First Class Shughart continued his protective fire until he depleted his ammunition and was fatally wounded. His actions saved the pilot's life. Sergeant First Class Shughart's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest standards of military service and reflect great credit upon him, his unit and the United States Army.Department of the Army, General Orders No. 14 (May 23, 1994)Presented to his Widow at the White House By President William J. Clinton on May 23, 1994October 3, 19931st Special Forces Operational Detachment - Delta(Task Force Ranger)Special Operations CommandMogadishu, SomaliaAugust 13, 1958Lincoln, Nebraska KIA: October 4, 1993Westminster (Garden of Benediction)Carlisle, Pennsylvania
100129 Somalia (1993)1993KIA (Somalia)Gordon, Gary IvanMaster SergeantUnited States ArmyLincoln, Maine Operation Restore HopeGary Gordon graduated from Mattanawcook Academy in 1978 and then joined the U.S. Army at age 18. He initially trained as an Army Combat Engineer before transferring to the U.S. Army Special Forces. Both he and fellow "Delta" Operator Randall Shughart, a close friend as well as team member, were Killed in Action during the Somalia mission that became known as the "Blackhawk Down" mission. Both Shughart and Gordon were awarded Posthumous Medals of Honor, the only Medal of Honor Awards in the interim between the Vietnam War and the Global War on Terrorism.The President of the United States of America, in the name of Congress, takes pride in presenting the Medal of Honor (Posthumously) to Master Sergeant Gary Ivan Gordon, United States Army, for gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of life above and beyond the call of duty, on 3 October 1993, while serving as Sniper Team Leader, United States Army Special Operations Command with Task Force Ranger in Mogadishu, Somalia, in support of Operation RESTORE HOPE. On that date, Master Sergeant Gordon's sniper team provided precision fires from the lead helicopter during an assault and at two helicopter crash sites, while subjected to intense automatic weapons and rocket propelled grenade fires. When Master Sergeant Gordon learned that ground forces were not immediately available to secure the second crash site, he and another sniper unhesitatingly volunteered to be inserted to protect the four critically wounded personnel, despite being well aware of the growing number of enemy personnel closing in on the site. After his third request to be inserted, Master Sergeant Gordon received permission to perform his volunteer mission. When debris and enemy ground fires at the site caused them to abort the first attempt, Master Sergeant Gordon was inserted one hundred meters south of the crash site. Equipped with only his sniper rifle and a pistol, Master Sergeant Gordon and his fellow sniper, while under intense small arms fire from the enemy, fought their way through a dense maze of shanties and shacks to reach the critically injured crew members. Master Sergeant Gordon immediately pulled the pilot and the other crew members from the aircraft, establishing a perimeter which placed him and his fellow sniper in the most vulnerable position. Master Sergeant Gordon used his long range rifle and side arm to kill an undetermined number of attackers until he depleted his ammunition. Master Sergeant Gordon then went back to the wreckage, recovering some of the crew's weapons and ammunition. Despite the fact that he was critically low on ammunition, he provided some of it to the dazed pilot and then radioed for help. Master Sergeant Gordon continued to travel the perimeter, protecting the downed crew. After his team member was fatally wounded and his own rifle ammunition exhausted, Master Sergeant Gordon returned to the wreckage, recovering a rifle with the last five rounds of ammunition and gave it to the pilot with the words, "good luck." Then, armed only with his pistol, Master Sergeant Gordon continued to fight until he was fatally wounded. His actions saved the pilot's life. Master Sergeant Gordon's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest standards of military service and reflect great credit upon, his unit and the United States Army.Department of the Army, General Orders No. 13 (May 23, 1994)Presented to his Widow at the White House By President William J. Clinton on May 23, 1994October 3, 19931st Special Forces Operational Detachment - Delta(Task Force Ranger)Special Operations CommandMogadishu, SomaliaAugust 30, 1960Lincoln, Maine KIA: October 3, 1993Lincoln Center CemeteryLincoln, Maine
333926 U.S.S. Liberty (1967)1967McGonagle, William LorenCaptainUnited States NavyThermal, California U.S.S. Liberty IncidentThe U.S.S. Liberty was attacked by Israeli forces two days after the Six-Day War between Israel and several Arab nations commenced. The Israeli government apologized for the incident that killed 34 members of the crew and wounded 171, claiming their fighters had mistaken it for an Egyptian vessel. Purportedly, in order to avoid further embarrassing the government of Israel, William McGonagle's Medal of Honor was quietly presented in a simple ceremony at the Washington Navy Yard, as was a posthumous award of the Navy Cross to the ship's Executive Officer and a member of the crew. This may be the only Medal of Honor ever awarded to an American serviceman for heroism in action against a nation that was not at war with the United States.The President of the United States of America, in the name of Congress, takes pleasure in presenting the Medal of Honor to Captain William Loren McGonagle (NSN: 494467), United States Navy, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty as Commanding Officer of the U.S.S. LIBERTY in the Mediterranean Sea on 8 and 9 June 1967. Sailing in international waters, the LIBERTY was attacked without warning by jet fighter aircraft and motor torpedo boats which inflicted many casualties among the crew and caused extreme damage to the ship. Although severely wounded during the first air attack, Captain McGonagle remained at his battle station on the badly damaged bridge and, with full knowledge of the seriousness of his wounds, subordinated his own welfare to the safety and survival of his command. Steadfastly refusing any treatment which would take him away from his post, he calmly continued to exercise firm command of his ship. Despite continuous exposure to fire, he maneuvered his ship, directed its defense, supervised the control of flooding and fire, and saw to the care of the casualties. Captain McGonagle's extraordinary valor under these conditions inspired the surviving members of the LIBERTY's crew, many of them seriously wounded, to heroic efforts to overcome the battle damage and keep the ship afloat. Subsequent to the attack, although in great pain and weak from the loss of blood, Captain McGonagle remained at his battle station and continued to command his ship for more than 17 hours. It was only after rendezvous with a U.S. destroyer that he relinquished personal control of the LIBERTY and permitted himself to be removed from the bridge. Even then, he refused much needed medical attention until convinced that the seriously wounded among his crew had been treated. Captain McGonagle's superb professionalism, courageous fighting spirit, and valiant leadership saved his ship and many lives. His actions sustain and enhance the finest traditions of the U.S. Naval Service.Presented at Admiral Leutze Park, Washington Navy Yard by Secretary of the Navy Paul R. Ignatius on June 06, 1968June 08 & 9, 1967Commanding OfficerU.S.S. Liberty (ATGR-5)Eastern MediterraneanNovember 19, 1925Wichita, Kansas March 03, 1999Arlington National CemeteryArlington, Virginia
312618 Interim (1918-1942)1939Badders, WilliamChief Machinist's MateUnited States NavyIndianapolis, Indiana Peace Time AwardsThe President of the United States of America, in the name of Congress, takes pleasure in presenting the Medal of Honor to Chief Machinist's Mate William Badders, United States Navy, for extraordinary heroism in the line of his profession as a Diver with the Submarine and Rescue Salvage Unit, U.S.S. Falcon, during the rescue and salvage operations following the sinking of the U.S.S. Squalus on 13 May 1939. During the rescue operations, Chief Machinist's Mate Badders, as senior member of the rescue chamber crew, made the last extremely hazardous trip of the rescue chamber to attempt to rescue any possible survivors in the flooded after portion of the Squalus. He was fully aware of the great danger involved in that if he and his assistant became incapacitated, there was no way in which either could be rescued. During the salvage operations, Chief Machinist's Mate Badders made important and difficult dives under the most hazardous conditions. His outstanding performance of duty contributed much to the success of the operations and characterizes conduct far above and beyond the ordinary call of duty.Presented at Washington, D.C., by Secretary of the Navy Charles Edison on January 19, 1940May 23, 1939Submarine & Rescue Salvage UnitU.S.S. Falcon (ASR-2)Portsmouth, NHSeptember 15, 1900Harrisburg, Illinois November 23, 1986San Francisco National CemeterySan Francisco, California
248418 Interim (1918-1942)1939Crandall, Orson LeonChief Boatswain's MateUnited States NavyConnecticut Peace Time AwardsThe President of the United States of America, in the name of Congress, takes pleasure in presenting the Medal of Honor to Chief Boatswain's Mate Orson Leon Crandall, United States Navy, for extraordinary heroism in the line of his profession as a Master Diver with the Submarine and Rescue Salvage Unit, U.S.S. Falcon, throughout the rescue and salvage operations following the sinking of the U.S.S. Squalus on 23 May 1939. Chief Boatswain's Mate Crandall's leadership and devotion to duty in directing diving operations and in making important and difficult dives under the most hazardous conditions characterize conduct far above and beyond the ordinary call of duty.Presented at Washington, D.C., by Secretary of the Navy Charles Edison on January 19, 1940May 23, 1939Submarine & Rescue Salvage UnitU.S.S. Falcon (ASR-2)Portsmouth, NHFebruary 2, 1903St. Joseph, Missouri May 10, 1960Arlington National CemeteryArlington, Virginia
177918 Interim (1918-1942)1939Mihalowski, JohnTorpedoman First ClassUnited States NavyWorcester, Massachusetts Peace Time AwardsThe President of the United States of America, in the name of Congress, takes pleasure in presenting the Medal of Honor to Torpedoman First Class John Mihalowski, United States Navy, for extraordinary heroism in the line of his profession as a Diver with the Submarine and Rescue Salvage Unit, U.S.S. Falcon, during the rescue and salvage operations following the sinking of the U.S.S. Squalus on 23 May 1939. Torpedoman First Class Mihalowski, as a member of the rescue chamber crew, made the last extremely hazardous trip of the rescue chamber to attempt the rescue of any possible survivors in the flooded after portion of the Squalus. He was fully aware of the great danger involved, in that, if he and the other member of the crew became incapacitated, there was no way in which either could be rescued. During the salvage operations Torpedoman First Class Mihalowski made important and difficult dives under the most hazardous conditions. His outstanding performance of duty contributed much to the success of the operations and characterizes conduct far above and beyond the ordinary call of duty.Presented at Washington, D.C., by Secretary of the Navy Charles Edison on January 19, 1940May 23, 1939Submarine & Rescue Salvage UnitU.S.S. Falcon (ASR-2)Portsmouth, NHAugust 12, 1910Worcester, Massachusetts October 29, 1993Serenity Gardens Memorial ParkLargo, Florida
157618 Interim (1918-1942)1939McDonald, James HarperChief MetalsmithUnited States NavyWashington, D. C. Peace Time AwardsThe President of the United States of America, in the name of Congress, takes pleasure in presenting the Medal of Honor to Chief Metalsmith James Harper McDonald, United States Navy, for extraordinary heroism in the line of his profession as a Master Diver with the Submarine and Rescue Salvage Unit, U.S.S. Falcon, throughout the rescue and salvage operations following the sinking of the U.S.S. Squalus on 23 May 1939. Chief Metalsmith McDonald's leadership, masterly skill, general efficiency, and untiring devotion to duty in directing diving operations, and in making important and difficult dives under the most hazardous conditions, characterize conduct far above and beyond the ordinary call of duty.Presented at Washington, D.C., by Secretary of the Navy Charles Edison on January 19, 1940May 23, 1939Submarine & Rescue Salvage UnitU.S.S. Falcon (ASR-2)Portsmouth, NHJuly 15, 1900Newmand, Scotland December 29, 1973Fishing Creek CemeteryRoulette, Pennsylvania
31218 Interim (1918-1942)1938DNB-1938Hutchins, Carlton BarmoreLieutenantUnited States NavyNew York, New York Peace Time AwardsCarlton Hutchins graduated from the U.S. Naval Academy at Annapolis, Class of 1926.The President of the United States of America, in the name of Congress, takes pride in presenting the Medal of Honor (Posthumously) to Lieutenant Carlton Barmore Hutchins, United States Navy, for extraordinary heroism as the Pilot of the U.S. Navy Seaplane PBY-2 No. 0463 (11-P-3) while engaged in tactical exercises with the U.S. Fleet on 2 February 1938 of the California coast. Although his plane was badly damaged, Lieutenant Hutchins remained at the controls endeavoring to bring the damaged plane to a safe landing and to afford an opportunity for his crew to escape by parachutes. His cool, calculated conduct contributed principally to the saving of the lives of all who survived. His conduct on this occasion was above and beyond the call of duty.February 2, 1938Seaplane PBY-2 (11-P-3)Air Mission (California Coast)September 12, 1904Albany, New York DNB: February 02, 1938
337218 Interim (1918-1942)1928Huber, William RussellMachinist's MateUnited States NavyHarrisburg, Pennsylvania 1928 - U.S.S. Bruce Incident (Virginia)The President of the United States of America, in the name of Congress, takes pleasure in presenting the Medal of Honor to Machinist's Mate William Russell Huber, United States Navy, for extraordinary heroism in the line of his profession on 11 June 1928, after a boiler accident on the U.S.S. Bruce, then at the Naval Shipyard, Norfolk, Virginia. Immediately on becoming aware of the accident, Machinist's Mate Huber without hesitation and in complete disregard of his own safety, entered the steam-filled fireroom and at grave risk to his life succeeded by almost superhuman efforts in carrying Charles H. Byran to safety. Although having received severe and dangerous burns about the arms and neck, he descended with a view toward rendering further assistance. The great courage, grit, and determination displayed by Machinist's Mate Huber on this occasion characterized conduct far above and beyond the call of duty.Presented at the White House By President Calvin Coolidge on December 15, 1928June 11, 1928U.S.S. BruceNavy Yard, Norfolk, VAJuly 16, 1902Harrisburg, Pennsylvania November 1982Golden Gate National CemeterySan Bruno, California
37118 Interim (1918-1942)1927Lindbergh, Charles Augustus, Jr.Captain (Air Corps)United States Army Air CorpsLittle Falls, Minnesota 1927 - Trans-Atlantic FlightCharles Lindbergh served in the Missouri National Guard and Reserves. During World War II he flew combat missions in the Pacific with Marine Ace Joe Foss and Army Ace Thomas McGuire. While on a mission with McGuire he shot down one Japanese plane, but because as a civilian advisor such combat missions were not authorized, it was not officially credited to him. Charles Lindbergh held the record in the Caterpillar Club (airmen forced to bail out of an airplane) with FOUR emergency jumps.The President of the United States of America, in the name of Congress, takes pleasure in presenting the Medal of Honor to Captain Charles Augustus Lindbergh, Jr., United States Army Air Corps (Reserve), for displaying heroic courage and skill as a navigator, at the risk of his life, by his nonstop flight in his airplane, the "Spirit of St. Louis," from New York City to Paris, France, 20 - 21 May 1927, by which Captain Lindbergh not only achieved the greatest individual triumph of any American citizen but demonstrated that travel across the ocean by aircraft was possible.War Department, General Orders 5 (1928) Act of CongressPresented By Special Act of Congress, 1928May 20 & 21, 1927Air Corps (Reserve)Air Mission (Atlantic Ocean)February 4, 1902Detroit, Michigan August 26, 1974Kipahulu Church CemeteryKipahulu, Maui, Hawaii
294718 Interim (1918-1942)1927Eadie, ThomasChief Gunner's MateUnited States NavyNewport, Rhode Island 1927 - U.S.S. S-4 Rescue and SalvageThe President of the United States of America, in the name of Congress, takes pleasure in presenting the Medal of Honor to Chief Gunner's Mate Thomas Eadie, United States Navy, for extraordinary heroism in the line of his profession above and beyond the call of duty on 18 December 1927, as a member of the Submarine and Rescue Salvage Unit, U.S.S. Falcon, during the diving operations in connection with the sinking of the U.S.S. S-4 with all on board, as a result of a collision off Provincetown, Massachusetts On this occasion when Michels, Chief Torpedoman, U.S. Navy, while attempting to connect an airline to the submarine at a depth of 102 feet became seriously fouled, Chief Gunner's Mate Eadie, under the most adverse diving conditions, deliberately, knowingly, and willingly took his own life in his hands by promptly descending to the rescue in response to the desperate need of his companion diver. After two hours of extremely dangerous and heartbreaking work, by his cool, calculating, and skillful labors, he succeeded in his mission and brought Michels safely to the surface.Presented at the White House by President Calvin Coolidge in January 1928December 18, 1927Submarine & Rescue Salvage UnitU.S.S. Falcon (ASR-2)Aboard Ship, At Sea near Vineyard Haven, MassachusettsApril 7, 1887Scotland November 14, 1974Island Cemetery AnnexNewport, Rhode Island
85018 Interim (1918-1942)1926Bennett, FloydMachinistUnited States NavyNew York, New York 1926 - Byrd North Pole FlightThe President of the United States of America, in the name of Congress, takes pleasure in presenting the Medal of Honor to Machinist Floyd Bennett, United States Navy, for distinguishing himself conspicuously by courage and intrepidity at the risk of his life 9 May 1926, as a member of the Byrd Arctic Expedition. Machinist Floyd Bennett contributed largely to the success of the first heavier-than-air flight to the North Pole and return.Presented at the White House by President Calvin Coolidge on February 25, 1927May 9, 1926Byrd ExpeditionAir Mission (North Pole)Tiffany CrossOctober 25, 1890Warrensburg, New York April 25, 1928Arlington National CemeteryArlington, Virginia
267318 Interim (1918-1942)1926Byrd, Richard Evelyn, Jr.CommanderUnited States NavyCharlottesville, Virginia 1926 - Byrd North Pole FlightRichard Byrd graduated from the U.S. Naval Academy at Annapolis, Class of 1912. He retired as a Rear Admiral in the U.S. Navy.The President of the United States of America, in the name of Congress, takes pleasure in presenting the Medal of Honor to Commander Richard Evenly Byrd, Jr. (NSN: 0-7918), United States Navy, for distinguishing himself conspicuously by courage and intrepidity at the risk of his life on 9 May 1926, in demonstrating that it is possible for aircraft to travel in continuous flight from a now inhabited portion of the earth over the North Pole and return.Presented at the White House by President Calvin Coolidge on February 25, 1927May 9, 1926Byrd ExpeditionAir Mission (North Pole)October 25, 1888Winchester, Virginia March 11, 1957Arlington National CemeteryArlington, Virginia
66617 Nicaragua (Second)1932Truesdell, Donald LeroyCorporalUnited States Marine CorpsLugoff, South Carolina 2d Nicaraguan CampaignThe President of the United States of America, in the name of Congress, takes pleasure in presenting the Medal of Honor to Corporal Donald Leroy Truesdell, United States Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism in action in Nicaragua. Corporal Truesdell was second in command of a Guardia Nacional Patrol in active operations against armed bandit forces in the vicinity of Constancia, near Coco River, northern Nicaragua, on 24 April 1932. While the patrol was in formation on the trail searching for a bandit group with which contact had just previously been made, a rifle grenade fell from its carrier and struck a rock, igniting the detonator. Several men close to the grenade at the time were in danger. Corporal Truesdell, who was several yards away, could easily have sought cover and safety for himself. Knowing full well the grenade would explode within two or three seconds, he rushed for the grenade, grasped it in his right hand, and attempted to throw it away from the patrol. The grenade exploded in his hand, blowing it off and inflicting serious multiple wounds about his body. Corporal Truesdell, in taking the full shock of the explosion himself, saved the members of the patrol from loss of life or serious injury.Presented By Brigadier Randolph C. Berkeley (Date Unknown)April 24, 1932Guardia NacionalConstancia, Coco River, NicaraguaAugust 8, 1906Lugoff, South Carolina September 21, 1993Truesdale Family Cemetery (Cremated)Lugoff, South Carolina
49217 Nicaragua (Second)1928Schilt, Christian FranklinFirst LieutenantUnited States Marine CorpsRichland County, Illinois 2d Nicaraguan CampaignChristian Schilt enlisted in the Marine Corps in 1917 after attending Rose Polytechnic Institute in Terre Haute, Indiana. He served as an enlisted Marine in the 1st Marine Aeronautical Company in World War I and reached the rank of corporal before he was commissioned in 1917. He retired as a United States Marine Corps General in 1957, after serving as Director of Aviation and Assistant Commandant of the Marine Corps for Air.The President of the United States of America, in the name of Congress, takes pleasure in presenting the Medal of Honor to First Lieutenant Christian Franklin Schilt (MCSN: 0-863), United States Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism while serving with Marine Observation Squadron 7/M (VO-7M), in action during the progress of an insurrection at Quilali, Nicaragua, 6, 7, and 8 January 1928. First Lieutenant Schilt, then a member of a Marine expedition which had suffered severe losses in killed and wounded, volunteered under almost impossible conditions to evacuate the wounded by air and transport a relief commanding officer to assume charge of a very serious situation. First Lieutenant Schilt bravely undertook this dangerous and important task and, by taking off a total of ten times in the rough, rolling street of a partially burning village, under hostile infantry fire on each occasion, succeeded in accomplishing his mission, thereby actually saving three lives and bringing supplies and aid to others in desperate need.January 6 - 8, 1928Marine Observation Squadron 7 (VMO-7)Air Mission (Quilali, Nicaragua)Tiffany CrossMarch 18, 1895Richland County, Illinois January 8, 1987Arlington National CemeteryArlington, Virginia