Korean War

After World War II divided Korea into a Communist Northern half and an American occupied Southern Half, turmoil was constant and a war was inevitable.

The Korean War began when the North Korean Communist Army invaded the Southern half of Korea in 1950. The North Korean side was heavily backed by the Soviet Union, allowing them to quickly take control of South Korea. That is when U.S. forces stepped in. General Douglas MacArthur commanded forces in an effort to hold off the North Koreans at the southernmost point of the Korean Peninsula. If won by the North Koreans, they would have seized control of the entire Korean Peninsula.

Korean War Veterans Memorial
More than 36,000 Americans were killed in action during the Korean War.

As General MacArthur continued to successfully advance, he was able to recapture the South Korean capital city of Seoul. General MacArthur could not be stopped. He continued up the peninsula, reclaiming all of South Korea and crossing the border into North Korea to continue his conquest. Eventually, his forces were met by Chinese resistance. After a long battle fought against the Communist Chinese, morale eventually began to swing back in the direction of the American’s.

Due to the daring and risky decisions that General MacArthur was making against President Truman’s orders, MacArthur was relieved of command. General Matthew Ridgway took over and was able to hold off the Communist’s just north of the original border between divided Korea.

After years of tried negotiations, a peace treaty was finally signed in 1953 declaring Korea a divided state, yet again. For a relatively short war, the American’s suffered heavy losses including the lives of almost 40,000 soldiers.

A+E Networks (2009). Korean War. Retrieved July 24, 2018 from www.history.com/topics/korean-war

Korean War Medal of Honor Recipients